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View Poll Results: Quiet or Mouthez of Babez
Quiet, please. 17 45.95%
Nah, man. It's TEH MOUTHEZ OF BABEZ. 20 54.05%
Voters: 37. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:06 PM   #1
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Default Quiet or Mouthz of Babez

yeah man dis poll iz about whether or not u dig quiet or da mouthez of babez better.

 
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:25 PM   #2
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Billy Corgan buys a piece of the Gold Coast

Ten months after selling his Victorian painted lady mansion in Lake View for $1 million, former Smashing Pumpkins lead singer and chief songwriter Billy Corgan has paid $2.95 million for a recently renovated, historic six-room condominium on the Gold Coast.

After disbanding the Smashing Pumpkins, Corgan formed a new group, Zwan, which is playing three sold-out shows at the Double Door this weekend.

Through his tour manager, Corgan declined to comment on the purchase of the two-bedroom condo. His tour manager confirmed that the singer-songwriter recently has been staying at the condo while rehearsing for Zwan's current tour, but said the Chicago-area native ultimately intends to lease the condo in a 110-year-old building to someone else. The unit has an oak-paneled living room, reception room, balcony framed by granite columns, four fireplaces, walnut parquet floors and a large terrace.

Corgan has shown an affinity for vintage properties. After moving out of the more than 100-year-old Lake View home at 3448 N. Greenview Ave., which he owned from 1993 to 2001, Corgan temporarily stayed in a penthouse in the Haberdasher Square loft development, 728 W. Jackson Blvd., a former manufacturing building that dates to 1926. And in 2000, the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois awarded Corgan its President's Award for his commitment to historic preservation.

Since Corgan sold his Lake View home, one Smashing Pumpkins Web site reported that he has been living in Italy, but in interviews he has declined any comment on his permanent residence.

Singer Courtney Love, whom Corgan dated many years ago, just sold her loft in downtown Manhattan for $3 million after buying it for $2.6 million in January 2001, according to the New York Post. The loft is in the same building where rocker Lenny Kravitz just listed his own, five-bedroom, 7,000-square-foot, multilevel loft for $16 million, after buying the space unfinished in October 2000 for $8 million, the Post reported.

Love also recently listed her almost 3,700-square-foot Spanish-style house on Los Angeles' Westside -- which she bought last June for $3 million -- for about the same price, according to the Los Angeles Times. Love reportedly is looking for another house in the area because her five-bedroom house, which was built in the 1920s, is too small.

Ironically, Love told the Times last year that she sold a four-bedroom, 4,700-square-foot French country-style house on almost 2 acres in the Hollywood Hills -- which she had purchased from Ellen DeGeneres in 1997 for about $3 million -- because she was planning to spend more time in New York and actually wanted something smaller in L.A. She sold the Hollywood Hills home for $3.995 million in March 2001 to British businessman Mike Walley. Love's former Hollywood Hills house made the news in November 2001, after Paul McCartney's fellow Beatle George Harrison died. After Harrison's representatives gave a bogus L.A. address on his death certificate, the county's district attorney revealed in February that Harrison actually had died at Walley's house.

Rocker Tom Petty has paid close to $2.5 million for a three-bedroom oceanfront home in Malibu, Calif., according to the Los Angeles Times. Built in 1974, the house has three fireplaces, Malibu tiles and a courtyard with a fountain, the paper reported ... Fred Durst, frontman for the rock group Limp Bizkit, has sold a house he never moved into in Bel Air, Calif., for $3.7 million because it had "vibes that were not quite correct for him," according to the Los Angeles Times. Last fall, Durst bought the four-bedroom, 6,600-square-foot house, which was once owned by the Doors' Robbie Krieger and has a carving of the Doors playing on one wall, for just under $4 million, the paper reported. Durst recently bought a house with a sound studio in L.A.'s Hollywood Hills, and has listed that home for $1.4 million, the Times reported.

Corgan pays $6.8 million for mansion on the lake

Former Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan founder and solo rock star Billy Corgan has paid $6.8 million for an 18-room lakefront mansion in the northern suburbs that was designed by celebrated architect David Adler.

Built in 1926, the seven-bedroom Normandy chateau-style mansion sits on more than 6 acres and first was listed in 2000 for $11.9 million. It later was reduced to $9.5 million, then to $8.5 million and finally to $7.5 million before its sale.

The house has a music room, garden room, gallery, great hall, seven fireplaces and 6½ baths, French parquet flooring and Chinese wallpaper, according to listing information. The property has 354 feet of private beach.

The sellers had owned the mansion since 1946 and Corgan is only the home's third owner, according to listing agent Honore Frumentino of Koenig & Strey.

Corgan is no stranger to Adler's work, having paid $2.95 million in 2002 for a renovated, 3,500- square-foot, six-room, full-floor condo in an Adler-designed building on the North Side that once was a mansion. At that time, Corgan's tour manager and spokesman, Tim "Gooch" Lougee, confirmed that the singer-songwriter was staying at the condo but had intended to lease out the unit. It's not clear whether Corgan plans to reside in both homes.

The rocker previously lived in a Victorian painted lady on the North Side that he bought in 1993 for $455,000 and sold in 2000 for $1 million.

Corgan could not be reached for comment, and Lougee did not return a telephone call.

Frumentino, who would not confirm the buyer's identity, said, "The sellers are very, very thankful that they sold it to a passionate preservationist. They're pleased that the house will remain in all its glory and will remain intact."

Corgan's purchase price is the 10th highest for a home here, surpassed by:

• The $12 million sale of a lakefront house on the North Shore in 2000
• The $11.45 million sale of that same property in 2001
• Two $10 million-plus condo sales on the Gold Coast in 2002
• The $9.9 million purchase last year by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. CEO Bill Wrigley of a north suburban lakefront mansion
• The $9.5 million sale of former MarchFirst CEO Robert Bernard's North Side mansion in 2002
• An investment banker's $9.5 million purchase of a mansion in Winnetka in 2002
• The $8.5 million sale of a lakefront house in Wilmette in 2002
• The $7.95 million sale last summer of White Sox slugger Frank Thomas' west suburban mansion.

In addition, Corgan's purchase is the highest price on record that a celebrity has paid for a Chicago-area house, surpassing the $4.79 million author Scott Turow paid in 2001for a north suburban lakefront house.

However, the original sale prices for some of the area's highest-priced celebrity homes aren't available. Basketball great Michael Jordan, for instance, built his massive North Shore mansion from scratch, so no purchase price is available. Talk-show queen Oprah Winfrey gradually bought and combined multiple condominiums in her Near North Side building to create a unit that would surpass the value of Corgan's mansion, according to agents who sell in the area. And Thomas also built his recently sold mansion from scratch.

Corgan's former bandmates also have shown an affinity for the north suburbs. Former Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan drummer Jimmy Chamberlin paid $832,500 in late 2001 for a house on 4.28 acres in the far north suburbs, and former Smashing Pumpkins guitarist James Iha paid $1.05 million in 1998 for a house in the near north suburbs that he sold for $1.16 million in 2001. Iha, who now lives in New York City, still owns a house on the Far North Side of Chicago that he bought in 1994 for $260,000.

Billy Corgan buys a piece of the Gold Coast

Ten months after selling his Victorian painted lady mansion in Lake View for $1 million, former Smashing Pumpkins lead singer and chief songwriter Billy Corgan has paid $2.95 million for a recently renovated, historic six-room condominium on the Gold Coast.

After disbanding the Smashing Pumpkins, Corgan formed a new group, Zwan, which is playing three sold-out shows at the Double Door this weekend.

Through his tour manager, Corgan declined to comment on the purchase of the two-bedroom condo. His tour manager confirmed that the singer-songwriter recently has been staying at the condo while rehearsing for Zwan's current tour, but said the Chicago-area native ultimately intends to lease the condo in a 110-year-old building to someone else. The unit has an oak-paneled living room, reception room, balcony framed by granite columns, four fireplaces, walnut parquet floors and a large terrace.

Corgan has shown an affinity for vintage properties. After moving out of the more than 100-year-old Lake View home at 3448 N. Greenview Ave., which he owned from 1993 to 2001, Corgan temporarily stayed in a penthouse in the Haberdasher Square loft development, 728 W. Jackson Blvd., a former manufacturing building that dates to 1926. And in 2000, the Landmarks Preservation Council of Illinois awarded Corgan its President's Award for his commitment to historic preservation.

Since Corgan sold his Lake View home, one Smashing Pumpkins Web site reported that he has been living in Italy, but in interviews he has declined any comment on his permanent residence.

Singer Courtney Love, whom Corgan dated many years ago, just sold her loft in downtown Manhattan for $3 million after buying it for $2.6 million in January 2001, according to the New York Post. The loft is in the same building where rocker Lenny Kravitz just listed his own, five-bedroom, 7,000-square-foot, multilevel loft for $16 million, after buying the space unfinished in October 2000 for $8 million, the Post reported.

Love also recently listed her almost 3,700-square-foot Spanish-style house on Los Angeles' Westside -- which she bought last June for $3 million -- for about the same price, according to the Los Angeles Times. Love reportedly is looking for another house in the area because her five-bedroom house, which was built in the 1920s, is too small.

Ironically, Love told the Times last year that she sold a four-bedroom, 4,700-square-foot French country-style house on almost 2 acres in the Hollywood Hills -- which she had purchased from Ellen DeGeneres in 1997 for about $3 million -- because she was planning to spend more time in New York and actually wanted something smaller in L.A. She sold the Hollywood Hills home for $3.995 million in March 2001 to British businessman Mike Walley. Love's former Hollywood Hills house made the news in November 2001, after Paul McCartney's fellow Beatle George Harrison died. After Harrison's representatives gave a bogus L.A. address on his death certificate, the county's district attorney revealed in February that Harrison actually had died at Walley's house.

Rocker Tom Petty has paid close to $2.5 million for a three-bedroom oceanfront home in Malibu, Calif., according to the Los Angeles Times. Built in 1974, the house has three fireplaces, Malibu tiles and a courtyard with a fountain, the paper reported ... Fred Durst, frontman for the rock group Limp Bizkit, has sold a house he never moved into in Bel Air, Calif., for $3.7 million because it had "vibes that were not quite correct for him," according to the Los Angeles Times. Last fall, Durst bought the four-bedroom, 6,600-square-foot house, which was once owned by the Doors' Robbie Krieger and has a carving of the Doors playing on one wall, for just under $4 million, the paper reported. Durst recently bought a house with a sound studio in L.A.'s Hollywood Hills, and has listed that home for $1.4 million, the Times reported.

Corgan pays $6.8 million for mansion on the lake

Former Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan founder and solo rock star Billy Corgan has paid $6.8 million for an 18-room lakefront mansion in the northern suburbs that was designed by celebrated architect David Adler.

Built in 1926, the seven-bedroom Normandy chateau-style mansion sits on more than 6 acres and first was listed in 2000 for $11.9 million. It later was reduced to $9.5 million, then to $8.5 million and finally to $7.5 million before its sale.

The house has a music room, garden room, gallery, great hall, seven fireplaces and 6½ baths, French parquet flooring and Chinese wallpaper, according to listing information. The property has 354 feet of private beach.

The sellers had owned the mansion since 1946 and Corgan is only the home's third owner, according to listing agent Honore Frumentino of Koenig & Strey.

Corgan is no stranger to Adler's work, having paid $2.95 million in 2002 for a renovated, 3,500- square-foot, six-room, full-floor condo in an Adler-designed building on the North Side that once was a mansion. At that time, Corgan's tour manager and spokesman, Tim "Gooch" Lougee, confirmed that the singer-songwriter was staying at the condo but had intended to lease out the unit. It's not clear whether Corgan plans to reside in both homes.

The rocker previously lived in a Victorian painted lady on the North Side that he bought in 1993 for $455,000 and sold in 2000 for $1 million.

Corgan could not be reached for comment, and Lougee did not return a telephone call.

Frumentino, who would not confirm the buyer's identity, said, "The sellers are very, very thankful that they sold it to a passionate preservationist. They're pleased that the house will remain in all its glory and will remain intact."

Corgan's purchase price is the 10th highest for a home here, surpassed by:

• The $12 million sale of a lakefront house on the North Shore in 2000
• The $11.45 million sale of that same property in 2001
• Two $10 million-plus condo sales on the Gold Coast in 2002
• The $9.9 million purchase last year by Wm. Wrigley Jr. Co. CEO Bill Wrigley of a north suburban lakefront mansion
• The $9.5 million sale of former MarchFirst CEO Robert Bernard's North Side mansion in 2002
• An investment banker's $9.5 million purchase of a mansion in Winnetka in 2002
• The $8.5 million sale of a lakefront house in Wilmette in 2002
• The $7.95 million sale last summer of White Sox slugger Frank Thomas' west suburban mansion.

In addition, Corgan's purchase is the highest price on record that a celebrity has paid for a Chicago-area house, surpassing the $4.79 million author Scott Turow paid in 2001for a north suburban lakefront house.

However, the original sale prices for some of the area's highest-priced celebrity homes aren't available. Basketball great Michael Jordan, for instance, built his massive North Shore mansion from scratch, so no purchase price is available. Talk-show queen Oprah Winfrey gradually bought and combined multiple condominiums in her Near North Side building to create a unit that would surpass the value of Corgan's mansion, according to agents who sell in the area. And Thomas also built his recently sold mansion from scratch.

Corgan's former bandmates also have shown an affinity for the north suburbs. Former Smashing Pumpkins and Zwan drummer Jimmy Chamberlin paid $832,500 in late 2001 for a house on 4.28 acres in the far north suburbs, and former Smashing Pumpkins guitarist James Iha paid $1.05 million in 1998 for a house in the near north suburbs that he sold for $1.16 million in 2001. Iha, who now lives in New York City, still owns a house on the Far North Side of Chicago that he bought in 1994 for $260,000.

 
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:27 PM   #3
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White Stripes will play four nights on Conan. The Detroit duo will enjoy the longest stand in late-night history



By Gary Susman



The new house band on ''Late Night with Conan O'Brien'' will be the White Stripes. For a week, at least. NBC announced that Jack and Meg White will perform every night, from April 22 through 25, to promote their new album ''Elephant,'' which hits stores this Tuesday. According to NBC, that marks the longest stint for any guest band in late-night TV history.

Since O'Brien took over the franchise a decade ago, ''Late Night'' has been the most alt-rock-friendly of the after-hours talk shows. (The gig should make up for being postponed nine times on CBS' ''Late Show with David Letterman,'' as Jack White alleged in an interview last week.) ''It’s exciting to have a band as creative and relevant as The White Stripes at 'Late Night' for a whole week,'' O'Brien said in a statement. ''In fact, they’re staying at my apartment.''

 
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:27 PM   #4
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Vaccine
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For other uses, see Vaccine (disambiguation).

A vaccine is a biological preparation which is used to establish or improve immunity to a particular disease.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (e.g. to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g. vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

The term "vaccine" derives from Edward Jenner's 1796 use of cowpox (Latin variolζ vaccinζ, adapted from the Latin vaccīn-us, from vacca cow), which, when administered to humans, provided them protection against smallpox.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Types
* 3 Developing immunity
* 4 Schedule
* 5 Efficacy
* 6 Types of vaccine developments
* 7 Controversy
* 8 Economics of development
* 9 Intellectual property
* 10 Preservatives
* 11 Delivery systems
o 11.1 Plasmids
* 12 Use in nonhumans
* 13 Trends
* 14 See also
* 15 References
* 16 External links

[edit] History

The earliest vaccines were based on the concept of variolation originating in China, in which a person is deliberately infected with a weak form of smallpox as a form of inoculation. Jenner realized that milkmaids who had contact with cowpox did not get smallpox. The process of distributing and administrating vaccines is thus referred to as "vaccination". Jenner's work was continued by Louis Pasteur and others in the 19th century. Since vaccination against smallpox was much safer than smallpox inoculation, the latter fell into disuse and was eventually banned in England in 1849.

The 19th and 20th centuries saw the introduction of several successful vaccines against a number of infectious diseases. These included bacterial and viral diseases, but not (to date) any parasitic diseases.
Please help improve this section by expanding it. Further information might be found on the talk page or at requests for expansion. (August 2008)


[edit] Types
Avian Flu vaccine development by reverse genetics techniques.

Vaccines may be dead or inactivated organisms or purified products derived from them.

There are four types of traditional vaccines:[1]

* Vaccines containing killed microorganisms - these are previously virulent micro-organisms which have been killed with chemicals or heat. Examples are vaccines against flu, cholera, bubonic plague, and hepatitis A.
* Vaccines containing live, attenuated virus microorganisms - these are live micro-organisms that have been cultivated under conditions that disable their virulent properties or which use closely-related but less dangerous organisms to produce a broad immune response. They typically provoke more durable immunological responses and are the preferred type for healthy adults. Examples ******* yellow fever, measles, rubella, and mumps. The live tuberculosis vaccine is not the contagious strain, but a related strain called "BCG"; it is used in the United States very infrequently.
* Toxoids - these are inactivated toxic compounds in cases where these (rather than the micro-organism itself) cause illness. Examples of toxoid-based vaccines ******* tetanus and diphtheria. Not all toxoids are for micro-organisms; for example, Crotalis atrox toxoid is used to vaccinate dogs against rattlesnake bites.
* Subunit - rather than introducing an inactivated or attenuated micro-organism to an immune system (which would constitute a "whole-agent" vaccine), a fragment of it can create an immune response. Characteristic examples ******* the subunit vaccine against HBV that is composed of only the surface proteins of the virus (produced in yeast) and the virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) that is composed of the viral major capsid protein.

A number of innovative vaccines are also in development and in use:

* Conjugate - certain bacteria have polysaccharide outer coats that are poorly immunogenic. By linking these outer coats to proteins (e.g. toxins), the immune system can be led to recognize the polysaccharide as if it were a protein antigen. This approach is used in the Haemophilus influenzae type B vaccine.
* Recombinant Vector - by combining the physiology of one micro-organism and the DNA of the other, immunity can be created against diseases that have complex infection processes
* DNA vaccination - in recent years a new type of vaccine, created from an infectious agent's DNA called DNA vaccination, has been developed. It works by insertion (and expression, triggering immune system recognition) into human or animal cells, of viral or bacterial DNA. Some cells of the immune system that recognize the proteins expressed will mount an attack against these proteins and cells expressing them. Because these cells live for a very long time, if the pathogen that normally expresses these proteins is encountered at a later time, they will be attacked instantly by the immune system. One advantage of DNA vaccines is that they are very easy to produce and store. As of 2006, DNA vaccination is still experimental.

While most vaccines are created using inactivated or attenuated compounds from micro-organisms, synthetic vaccines are composed mainly or wholly of synthetic peptides, carbohydrates or antigens.

Vaccines may be monovalent (also called univalent) or multivalent (also called polyvalent). A monovalent vaccine is designed to immunize against a single antigen or single microorganism.[2] A multivalent or polyvalent vaccine is designed to immunize against two or more strains of the same microorganism, or against two or more microorganisms.[3]

[edit] Developing immunity

The immune system recognizes vaccine agents as foreign, destroys them, and 'remembers' them. When the virulent version of an agent comes along the body recognises the protein coat on the virus, and thus is prepared to respond, by (1) neutralizing the target agent before it can enter cells, and (2) by recognizing and destroying infected cells before that agent can multiply to vast numbers.

Vaccines have contributed to the eradication of smallpox, one of the most contagious and deadly diseases known to man. Other diseases such as rubella, polio, measles, mumps, chickenpox, and typhoid are nowhere near as common as they were a hundred years ago. As long as the vast majority of people are vaccinated, it is much more difficult for an outbreak of disease to occur, let alone spread. This effect is called herd immunity. Polio, which is transmitted only between humans, is targeted by an extensive eradication campaign that has seen endemic polio restricted to only parts of four countries.[2] The difficulty of reaching all children as well as cultural misunderstandings, however, have caused the anticipated eradication date to be missed several times.

[edit] Schedule

Main article: Vaccination schedule
See also: Vaccination policy

In order to provide best protection, children are recommended to receive vaccinations as soon as their immune systems are sufficiently developed to respond to particular vaccines, with additional 'booster' shots often required to achieve 'full immunity'. This has led to the development of complex vaccination schedules. In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which recommends schedule additions for the Center for Disease Control, recommends routine vaccination of children against: hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio, mumps, measles, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, HiB, chicken pox, rotavirus, influenza, meningococcal disease and pneumonia. The large number of vaccines and boosters recommended (up to 24 injections by age two) has led to problems with achieving full compliance. In order to combat declining compliance rates, various notification systems have been instituted and a number of combination injections are now marketed (e.g., Prevnar and ProQuad vaccines), which provide protection against multiple diseases.

Besides recommendations for infant vaccinations and boosters, many specific vaccines are recommended at other ages or for repeated injections throughout life -- most commonly for measles, tetanus, influenza, and pneumonia. Pregnant women are often screened for continued resistance to rubella. The human papillomavirus vaccine is currently recommended in the U.S. and UK for ages 11–25. Vaccine recommendations for the elderly concentrate on pneumonia and influenza, which are more deadly to that group. In 2006, a vaccine was introduced against shingles, a disease caused by the chicken pox virus, which usually affects the elderly.

In Australia, a massive increase in vaccination rates was observed when the federal government made certain benefits (such as the universal 'Family Allowance' welfare payments for parents of children) dependent upon vaccination compliance. As well, children were not allowed into school unless they were either vaccinated or their parents completed a statutory declaration refusing to immunize them, after discussion with a doctor, and other bureaucracy. (Similar school-entry vaccination regulations have been in place in some parts of Canada for several years.) It became easier and cheaper to vaccinate one's children than not to. When faced with the annoyance, many more casual objectors simply gave in.[citation needed]

[edit] Efficacy

Vaccines do not guarantee complete protection from a disease. Sometimes this is because the host's immune system simply doesn't respond adequately or at all. This may be due to a lowered immunity in general (diabetes, steroid use, HIV infection) or because the host's immune system does not have a B cell capable of generating antibodies to that antigen.

Even if the host develops antibodies, the human immune system is not perfect and in any case the immune system might still not be able to defeat the infection.

Adjuvants are typically used to boost immune response. Adjuvants are sometimes called the dirty little secret of vaccines [3] in the scientific community, as not much is known about how adjuvants work. Most often aluminium adjuvants are used, but adjuvants like squalene are also used in some vaccines and more vaccines with squalene and phosphate adjuvants are being tested. The efficacy or performance of the vaccine is dependent on a number of factors:

* the disease itself (for some diseases vaccination performs better than for other diseases)
* the strain of vaccine (some vaccinations are for different strains of the disease) [4]
* whether one kept to the timetable for the vaccinations (see Vaccination schedule)
* some individuals are 'non-responders' to certain vaccines, meaning that they do not generate antibodies even after being vaccinated correctly
* other factors such as ethnicity or genetic predisposition

When a vaccinated individual does develop the disease vaccinated against, the disease is likely to be milder than without vaccination.

The following are important considerations in the effectiveness of a vaccination program:[citation needed]

1. careful modelling to anticipate the impact that an immunisation campaign will have on the epidemiology of the disease in the medium to long term
2. ongoing surveillance for the relevant disease following introduction of a new vaccine and
3. maintaining high immunisation rates, even when a disease has become rare.

In 1958 there were 763,094 cases of measles and 552 deaths in the United States.[4][5] With the help of new vaccines, the number of cases dropped to fewer than 150 per year (median of 56).[5] In early 2008, there were 64 suspected cases of measles. 54 out of 64 infections were associated with importation from another country, although only 13% were actually acquired outside of the United States; 63 of these 64 individuals either had never been vaccinated against measles, or were uncertain whether they had been vaccinated.[5]

[edit] Types of vaccine developments
This section does not cite any references or sources.
Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unverifiable material may be challenged and removed. (June 2008)

* Rational attenuation. Specific modifications or deletions of genes that confer virulence reduce or remove the pathogenicity of the microbe while still allowing an immune response to be generated. This type of rational attenuation can be viewed as creating a "live" attenuated vaccine.

* Vector-mediated subunit delivery. Introducing a non-infectious, non-pathogenic subunit into a live vector can prompt an immune response without presence of the pathogen. This is called vector-mediated subunit delivery. For example, rabies surface protein gene has been inserted into vaccinia virus.

* Virus-like particles. Capsid proteins of icosahedral viruses assemble without the presence of a genome. These virus-like particles are antigenically authentic, but non-infectious. This has been used for HPV-16 and HPV-18 vaccines.

[edit] Controversy
James Gillray, The Cow-Pock—or—the Wonderful Effects of the New Inoculation! (1802)

Main article: Vaccine controversy

Opposition to vaccination, from a wide array of vaccine critics, has existed since the earliest vaccination campaigns.[6] Disputes have arisen over the morality, ethics, effectiveness, and safety of vaccination. The mainstream medical opinion is that the benefits of preventing suffering and death from serious infectious diseases greatly outweigh the risks of rare adverse effects following immunization.[7][8] Some vaccination critics say that vaccines are ineffective against disease[9] or that vaccine safety studies are inadequate.[8][9] Some religious groups do not allow vaccination,[10] and some political groups oppose mandatory vaccination on the grounds of individual liberty.[6]

[edit] Economics of development

One challenge in vaccine development is economic: many of the diseases most demanding a vaccine, including HIV, malaria and tuberculosis, exist principally in poor countries. Pharmaceutical firms and biotechnology companies have little incentive to develop vaccines for these diseases, because there is little revenue potential. Even in more affluent countries, financial returns are usually minimal and the financial and other risks are great.[11]

Most vaccine development to date has relied on 'push' funding by government, universities and non-profit organizations.[citation needed] Many vaccines have been highly cost effective and beneficial for public health.[11] The number of vaccines actually administered has risen dramatically in recent decades. This increase, particularly in the number of different vaccines administered to children before entry into schools may be due to government mandates and support, rather than economic incentive.[citation needed]

Many researchers and policymakers are calling for a different approach, using 'pull' mechanisms to motivate industry. Mechanisms such as prizes, tax credits, or advance market commitments could ensure a financial return to firms that successfully developed a HIV vaccine. If the policy were well-designed, it might also ensure people have access to a vaccine if and when it is developed.[citation needed]

[edit] Intellectual property

Intellectual property can also be viewed as an obstacle to the development of new vaccines. Because of the weak protection offered through the patent of the final product, the protection of the innovation regarding vaccines is often made through the patent of processes used on the development of new vaccines as well as the protection of secrecy.[12]

[edit] Preservatives

Many vaccines need preservatives to prevent serious adverse effects such as the Staphylococcus infection that, in one 1928 incident, killed 12 of 21 children inoculated with a diphtheria vaccine that lacked a preservative.[13] Several preservatives are available, including thiomersal, 2-phenoxyethanol, and formaldehyde. Thiomersal is more effective against bacteria, has better shelf life, and improves vaccine stability, potency, and safety, but in the U.S., the European Union, and a few other affluent countries, it is no longer used as a preservative in childhood vaccines, as a precautionary measure due to its mercury content.[14] Controversial claims have been made that thiomersal contributes to autism; no convincing scientific evidence supports these claims.[15]

[edit] Delivery systems

There are several new delivery systems in development, which will hopefully make vaccines more efficient to deliver. Possible methods ******* liposomes and ISCOM[16] (immune stimulating complex).

[edit] Plasmids

The use of plasmids has been validated in preclinical studies as a protective vaccine strategy for cancer and infectious diseases. However, the crossover application into human studies has been met with poor results based on the inability to provide clinically relevant benefit. The overall efficacy of plasmid DNA immunization depends on increasing the plasmid's immunogenicity while also correcting for factors involved in the specific activation of immune effector cells. [17]

[edit] Use in nonhumans

See also: Influenza vaccine#Flu vaccine for nonhumans and Vaccination of dogs

Vaccinations of animals are used both to prevent their contracting diseases and to prevent transmission of disease to humans. Both animals kept as pets and animals raised as livestock are routinely vaccinated. In some instances, wild populations may be vaccinated. This is sometimes accomplished with vaccine-laced food spread in a disease-prone area and has been used to attempt to control rabies in raccoons.

Where rabies occurs, rabies vaccination of dogs may be required by law. Other canine vaccines ******* canine distemper, canine parvovirus, canine hepatitis virus, adenovirus-2, leptospirosis, bordatella, canine parainfluenza virus, and Lyme disease among others.

[edit] Trends

Vaccine development has several trends:[18]

* Vaccines against cancers, autoimmune, and other noninfectious diseases are being developed.
* Until now, most vaccines have been aimed at infants and children, but adolescents and adults are increasingly being targeted.
* Combinations of vaccines are becoming more common; vaccines containing five or more components are used in many parts of the world.
* New methods of administering vaccines are being developed, such as skin patches, aerosols via inhalation devices, and eating genetically engineered plants.
* Vaccines are being designed to stimulate innate immune responses, as well as adaptive.
* Attempts are being made to develop vaccines to help cure chronic infections, as opposed to preventing disease.
* Vaccines are being developed to defend against bioterrorist attacks such as anthrax, plague, and smallpox.

[edit] See also

* Influenza vaccine
* Immune system
* OPV AIDS hypothesis, a refuted hypothesis that the AIDS pandemic emerged from polio vaccine manufacture.
* Immunology
* Immunization
* Inoculation
* Bacterin
* TA-CD, a vaccine which negates the effects of cocaine
* The Horse Named Jim
* Virosomes
* Vaccination
* List of vaccine topics
* Reverse vaccinology

[edit] References

1. [1]
2. Monovalent at Dorland's Medical Dictionary
3. Polyvalent vaccine at Dorlands Medical Dictionary
4. Orenstein WA, Papania MJ, Wharton ME (May 2004). "Measles elimination in the United States". J. Infect. Dis. 189 Suppl 1: S1–3. PMID 15106120.
5. a b c "Measles--United States, January 1-April 25, 2008" (May 2008). MMWR Morb. Mortal. Wkly. Rep. 57 (18): 494–8. PMID 18463608.
6. a b Wolfe R, Sharp L (2002). "Anti-vaccinationists past and present". BMJ 325 (7361): 430–2. doi:10.1136/bmj.325.7361.430. PMID 12193361.
7. Bonhoeffer J, Heininger U (2007). "Adverse events following immunization: perception and evidence". Curr Opin Infect Dis 20 (3): 237–46. doi:10.1097/QCO.0b013e32811ebfb0. PMID 17471032.
8. a b Demicheli V, Jefferson T, Rivetti A, Price D (2005). "Vaccines for measles, mumps and rubella in children". Cochrane Database Syst Rev 19 (4). doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004407.pub2. PMID 16235361. Lay summary – Cochrane press release (PDF) (2005-10-19).
9. a b Halvorsen R (2007). The Truth about Vaccines. Gibson Square. ISBN 9781903933923.
10. Sinal SH, Cabinum-Foeller E, Socolar R (2008). "Religion and medical neglect". South Med J 101 (7): 703–6. doi:10.1097/SMJ.0b013e31817997c9 (inactive 2008-10-26). PMID 18580731.
11. a b Goodman, Jesse L. (2005-05-04). "Statement of Jesse L. Goodman, M.D., M.P.H. Director, Center for Biologics, Evaluation and Research Before the Committee on Energy and Commerce United States House of Representatives". Retrieved on 2008-06-15.
12. Hardman Reis T (2006). "The role of intellectual property in the global challenge for immunization". J World Intellect Prop 9 (4): 413–25. doi:10.1111/j.1422-2213.2006.00284.x.
13. "Thimerosal in vaccines". Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research, U.S. Food and Drug Administration (2007-09-06). Retrieved on 2007-10-01.
14. Bigham M, Copes R (2005). "Thiomersal in vaccines: balancing the risk of adverse effects with the risk of vaccine-preventable disease". Drug Saf 28 (2): 89–101. doi:10.2165/00002018-200528020-00001. PMID 15691220.
15. Offit PA (2007). "Thimerosal and vaccines—a cautionary tale". N Engl J Med 357 (13): 1278–9. doi:10.1056/NEJMp078187. PMID 17898096.
16. Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews, 2004 (Vol. 56) (No. 10) 1367-1382 Morein, B., Hu KeFei, Abusugra, I
17. Lowe et al (2008). "Plasmid DNA as Prophylactic and Therapeutic vaccines for Cancer and Infectious Diseases", Plasmids: Current Research and Future Trends. Caister Academic Press. ISBN 978-1-904455-35-6.
18. Plotkin SA (2005). "Vaccines: past, present and future". Nat Med 11 (4 Suppl): S5–11. doi:10.1038/nm1209. PMID 15812490.

[edit] External links

* Vaccines and Antisera at the Open Directory Project
* "Immunization". MedlinePlus. U.S. National Library of Medicine (2007-12-27). Retrieved on 2008-01-14.
* VIOLIN: Vaccine Investigation and Online Information Network

[show]
v • d • e
Vaccines, Vaccination, Immunization, and Inoculation (see also artificial induction of immunity)
Development
Adjuvants • Cancer vaccines • DNA vaccination • HIV • Live vector vaccine • Models • Timeline • Trial
Administration
Global: GAVI • Policy • Schedule • Vaccine injury
USA: ACIP • VAERS • VSD • Vaccine court
Vaccines
live

Anthrax • BCG (tuberculosis) • Flu • MMR • MMRV • Polio(OPV) • Rotavirus • Smallpox • Varicella • Yellow fever
Inactivated/toxoid

inactivated virus: Flu • HAV • Polio(IPV) •• inactivated bacteria/toxoid: DTwP •• conjugate: Hib • PCV
Other

subunit: Anthrax • DTaP • HPV •• recombinant DNA: HBV •• other: Anthrax • PPV
Controversy
General • Autism Action Coalition • MMR • NCVIA • Pox party • SafeMinds • Simpsonwood • Thiomersal
See also
List of vaccine topics • Epidemiology • Eradication of infectious diseases
[show]
v • d • e
Major drug groups
Gastrointestinal tract/metabolism (A)
stomach acid (Antacids, H2 antagonists, Proton pump inhibitors) • Antiemetics • Laxatives • Antidiarrhoeals/Antipropulsives • Anti-obesity drugs • Anti-diabetics • Vitamins • Dietary minerals
Blood and blood forming organs (B)
Antithrombotics (Anticoagulants, Antiplatelets, Thrombolytics) • Antihemorrhagics
Cardiovascular system (C)
cardiac therapy/antianginals (Cardiac glycosides, Antiarrhythmics, Cardiac stimulant)

Antihypertensives • Diuretics • Vasodilators • Beta blockers • Calcium channel blockers • renin-angiotensin system (ACE inhibitors, Angiotensin II receptor antagonists, Renin inhibitors)
Antihyperlipidemics (Statins, Fibrates, Bile acid sequestrants)
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Emollients • Cicatrizant • Antipruritics • Antipsoriatic • Medicated dressings
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Hormonal contraception • Fertility agents • SERMs • Sex hormones
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Corticosteroids (Glucocorticoids, Mineralocorticoids) • Sex hormones • Thyroid hormones • Antithyroid agent
Infections and infestations (J, P)
Antibiotics • Antivirals • Vaccines • Antifungals • Antiparasitic (Antiprotozoals, Anthelmintics)
Malignant disease (L01-L02)
Anticancer agents (Antimetabolite, Alkylating, Spindle poison, Antineoplastic, Topoisomerase inhibitor)
Immune disease (L03-L04)
Immunomodulators (Immunostimulators, Immunosuppressants)
Muscles, bones, and joints (M)
Anabolic steroids • Anti-inflammatories (NSAID) • Antirheumatics • Corticosteroids • Muscle relaxants • Bisphosphonate
Brain and nervous system (N)
Anesthetics (General, Local) • Analgesics • Anticonvulsants • Mood stabilizers • Antiparkinson drug • Psycholeptic (Anxiolytics, Antipsychotics, Hypnotics/Sedatives) • Psychoanaleptic (Antidepressants, Stimulants/Psychostimulants)
Respiratory system (R)
Decongestants • Bronchodilators • Cough medicine • H1 antagonists
Other ATC (V)
Antidotes • Contrast media • Radiopharmaceuticals • Dressing

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vaccine"
Categories: Virology | Vaccination | Infectious diseases | Microbiology | Immunology

 
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Old 10-30-2008, 10:45 PM   #5
theghostchild
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Freedom!
By GEORGE J. CHURCH

For 28 years it had stood as the symbol of the division of Europe and the world, of Communist suppression, of the xenophobia of a regime that had to lock its people in lest they be tempted by another, freer life -- the Berlin Wall, that hideous, 28-mile-long scar through the heart of a once proud European capital, not to mention the soul of a people. And then -- poof! -- it was gone. Not physically, at least yet, but gone as an effective barrier between East and West, opened in one unthinkable, stunning stroke to people it had kept apart for more than a generation. It was one of those rare times when the tectonic plates of history shift beneath men's feet, and nothing after is quite the same.

What happened in Berlin last week was a combination of the fall of the Bastille and a New Year's Eve blowout, of revolution and celebration. At the stroke of midnight on Nov. 9, a date that not only Germans would remember, thousands who had gathered on both sides of the Wall let out a roar and started going through it, as well as up and over. West Berliners pulled East Berliners to the top of the barrier along which in years past many an East German had been shot while trying to escape; at times the Wall almost disappeared beneath waves of humanity. They tooted trumpets and danced on the top. They brought out hammers and chisels and whacked away at the hated symbol of imprisonment, knocking loose chunks of concrete and waving them triumphantly before television cameras. They spilled out into the streets of West Berlin for a champagne-spraying, horn-honking bash that continued well past dawn, into the following day and then another dawn. As the daily BZ would headline: BERLIN IS BERLIN AGAIN.

Nor was the Wall the only thing to come tumbling down. Many who served the regime that had built the barrier dropped from power last week. Both East Germany's Cabinet and the Communist Party Politburo resigned en masse, to be replaced by bodies in which reformers mingled with hard-liners. And that, supposedly, was only the start. On the same day that East Germany threw open its borders, Egon Krenz, 52, President and party leader, promised "free, general, democratic and secret elections," though there was no official word as to when. Could the Socialist Unity Party, as the Communists call themselves in East Germany, lose in such balloting? "Theoretically," replied Gunter Schabowski, the East Berlin party boss and a Politburo member.

Thus East Germany probably can be added, along with Poland and Hungary, to the list of East European states that are trying to abandon orthodox Communism for some as-yet-nebulous form of social democracy. The next to be engulfed by the tides of change appears to be Bulgaria; Todor Zhivkov, 78, its longtime, hard-line boss, unexpectedly resigned at week's end. Outlining the urgent need for "restructuring," his successor, Petar Mladenov, said, "This implies complex and far from foreseeable processes. But there is no alternative." In all of what used to be called the Soviet bloc, Zhivkov's departure leaves in power only Nicolae Ceausescu in Rumania and Milos Jakes in Czechoslovakia, both old-style Communist dictators. Their fate? Who knows? Only a few weeks ago, East Germany seemed one of the most stolidly Stalinist of all Moscow's allies and the one least likely to undergo swift, dramatic change.

The collapse of the old regimes and the astonishing changes under way in the Soviet Union open prospects for a Europe of cooperation in which the Iron Curtain disappears, people and goods move freely across frontiers, NATO and the Warsaw Pact evolve from military powerhouses into merely formal alliances, and the threat of war steadily fades. They also raise the question of German reunification, an issue for which politicians in the West or, for that matter, Moscow have yet to formulate strategies. Finally, should protest get out of hand, there is the risk of dissolution into chaos, sooner or later necessitating a crackdown and, possibly, a painful turn back to authoritarianism.

In East Germany the situation came close to spinning out of control. Considered a hard-liner, Krenz succeeded the dour Erich Honecker as party chief only three weeks ago, and eleven days after a state visit by Mikhail Gorbachev. Ever since, Krenz has had to scramble to find concessions that might quiet public turmoil and enable him to hang on to at least a remnant of power. He has been spurred by a series of mass protests -- one demonstration in Leipzig drew some 500,000 East Germans -- demanding democracy and freedoms small and large, and by a fresh wave of flight to the West by many of East Germany's most productive citizens. So far this year, some 225,000 East Germans out of a population of 16 million have voted with their feet, pouring into West Germany through Hungary and Czechoslovakia at rates that last week reached 300 an hour. Most are between the ages of 20 and 40, and their departure has left behind a worsening labor shortage. Last week East German soldiers had to be pressed into civilian duty to keep trams, trains and buses running.

The Wall, of course, was built in August 1961 for the very purpose of stanching an earlier exodus of historic dimensions, and for more than a generation it performed the task with brutal efficiency. Opening it up would have seemed the least likely way to stem the current outflow. But Krenz and his aides were apparently gambling that if East Germans lost the feeling of being walled in, and could get out once in a while to visit friends and relatives in the West or simply look around, they would feel less pressure to flee the first chance they got. Beyond that, opening the Wall provided the strongest possible indication that Krenz meant to introduce freedoms that would make East Germany worth staying in. In both Germanys and around the world, after all, the Wall had become the perfect symbol of oppression. Ronald Reagan in 1987, standing at the Brandenburg Gate with his back to the barrier, was the most recent in a long line of visiting Western leaders who challenged the Communists to level the Wall if they wanted to prove that they were serious about liberalizing their societies. "Mr. Gorbachev, open this gate!" cried the President. "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall!" There was no answer from Moscow at the time; only nine months ago, Honecker vowed that the Wall would remain for 100 years.

When the great breach finally came, it started undramatically. At a press conference last Thursday, Schabowski announced almost offhandedly that starting at midnight, East Germans would be free to leave at any point along the country's borders, including the crossing points through the Wall in Berlin, without special permission, for a few hours, a day or forever. Word spread rapidly through both parts of the divided city, to the 2 million people in the West and the 1.3 million in the East. At Checkpoint Charlie, in West Berlin's American sector, a crowd gathered well before midnight. Many had piled out of nearby bars, carrying bottles of champagne and beer to celebrate. As the hour drew near, they taunted East German border guards with cries of "Tor Auf!" (Open the gate!).

On the stroke of midnight, East Berliners began coming through, some waving their blue ID cards in the air. West Berliners embraced them, offered them champagne and even handed them deutsche mark notes to finance a celebration (the East German mark, a nonconvertible currency, is almost worthless outside the country). "I just can't believe it!" exclaimed Angelika Wache, 34, the first visitor to cross at Checkpoint Charlie. "I don't feel like I'm in prison anymore!" shouted one young man. Torsten Ryl, 24, was one of many who came over just to see what the West was like. "Finally, we can really visit other states instead of just seeing them on television or hearing about them," he said. "I don't intend to stay, but we must have the possibility to come over here and go back again." The crowd erupted in whistles and cheers as a West Berliner handed Ryl a 20-mark bill and told him, "Go have a beer first."

Many of the visitors pushed on to the Kurfurstendamm, West Berlin's boulevard of fancy stores, smart cafes and elegant hotels, to see prosperity at first hand. At 3 a.m., the street was a cacophony of honking horns and happily shouting people; at 5 some were still sitting in hotel lobbies, waiting for dawn. One group was finishing off a bottle of champagne in the lobby of the Hotel Am Zoo, chatting noisily. "We're going back, of course," said a woman at the table. "But we must wait to see the stores open. We must see that."

Later in the day, two young workers from an East Berlin electronics factory who drove through Checkpoint Charlie in a battered blue 1967 Skoda provided a hint that Krenz may in fact have scored a masterstroke by relieving some of the pressure to emigrate. Uwe Grebasch, 28, the driver, said he and his companion, Frank Vogel, 28, had considered leaving East Germany for good but decided against it. "We can take it over there as long as we can leave once in a while," said Grebasch. "Our work is O.K., but they must now let us travel where we want, when we want, with no limits."

The world has, or thought it had, become accustomed to change in Eastern Europe, where every week brings developments that would have seemed unbelievable a short while earlier. Nonetheless, the opening of the Wall caught it off guard. President George Bush, who summoned reporters into the Oval Office Thursday afternoon, declared himself "very pleased" but seemed oddly subdued. Aides attributed that partly to his natural caution, partly to uncertainty about what the news meant, largely to a desire to do or say nothing that might provoke a crackdown in East Germany. As the President put it, "We're handling it in a way where we are not trying to give anybody a hard time." By Friday, though, Bush realized he had badly underplayed a historic event and, in a speech in Texas, waxed more enthusiastic. "I was moved, as you all were, by the pictures," said Bush. He also got in a plug for his forthcoming meeting with Gorbachev on ships anchored off the coast of Malta: "The process of reform initiated by the East Europeans and supported by Mr. Gorbachev . . . offers us all much hope and deserves encouragement."

Gorbachev in fact may have done more than merely support the East German opening. It was no coincidence that Honecker resigned shortly after the Soviet President visited East Berlin, and that the pace of reform picked up sharply after Krenz returned from conferring with Gorbachev in Moscow two weeks ago. In pursuing perestroika -- in his eyes not to be limited to the U.S.S.R. -- and preaching reform, Gorbachev has made it clear that Moscow will tolerate almost any political or economic system among its allies, so long as they remain in the Warsaw Pact and do nothing detrimental to Soviet security interests. The Kremlin greeted the opening of the Wall as "wise" and "positive," in the words of Foreign Ministry spokesman Gennadi Gerasimov, who said it should help dispel "stereotypes about the Iron Curtain." But he warned against interpreting the move as a step toward German reunification, which in Moscow's view could come about only after a dissolution of both NATO and the Warsaw Pact, if at all.

West Germany, the country most immediately and strongly affected, was both overjoyed and stunned. In Bonn members of the Bundestag, some with tears in their eyes, spontaneously rose and sang the national anthem. It was a rare demonstration in a country in which open displays of nationalistic sentiment have been frowned on since the Third Reich died in 1945.

"Developments are now unforeseeable," said West German Chancellor Helmut Kohl, who interrupted a six-day official visit to Poland to fly to West Berlin for a celebration. "I have no doubt that unity will eventually be achieved. The wheel of history is turning faster now." At the square in front of the Schoneberg town hall, where John F. Kennedy had proclaimed in 1963 that "Ich bin ein Berliner," West Berlin Mayor Walter Momper declared, "The Germans are the happiest people in the world today." Willy Brandt, who had been mayor when the Wall went up and later, as federal Chancellor, launched a Bonn Ostpolitik that focused on building contacts with the other Germany, proclaimed that "nothing will be the same again. The winds of change blowing through Europe have not avoided East Germany." Kohl, who drew some boos and whistles as well as cheers, repeated his offer to extend major financial and economic aid to East Germany if it carried through on its pledges to permit a free press and free elections. "We are ready to help you rebuild your country," said Kohl. "You are not alone."

Running through the joy in West Germany, however, was a not-so-subtle undertone of anxiety. Suppose the crumbling of the Wall increases rather than reduces the flood of permanent refugees? West Germany's resources are being strained in absorbing, so far this year, the 225,000 immigrants from East Germany, as well as 300,000 other ethnic Germans who have flocked in from the Soviet Union and Poland. According to earlier estimates, up to 1.8 million East Germans, or around 10% of the population, might flee to the West if the borders were opened -- as they were last week all along East Germany's periphery. (Within 48 hours of the opening of the Wall, nearly 2 million East Germans had crossed over to visit the West; at one frontier post, a 30-mile- long line of cars was backed up.) West Germans fear they simply could not handle so enormous a population shift.

Thus West German leaders' advice to their compatriots from the East was an odd amalgam: We love you, and if you come, we will welcome you with open arms -- but really, we wish you would stay home. "Anyone who wants can come," said Mayor Momper, but added, "Please, even with all the understandable joy you must feel being able to come to the West, please do it tomorrow, do it the day after tomorrow. We are having trouble dealing with this." In Bonn, Interior Minister Wolfgang Schauble warned would-be refugees that with a cold winter coming on, the country is short of housing. Hannover Mayor Herbert Schmalstieg, who is also vice president of the German Urban Council, called for legal limits on the influx -- an act that federal authorities say would be unconstitutional since West Germany's Basic Law stipulates that citizenship is available to all refugees of German ethnic stock and their descendants.

The reaction is another indication of how the sudden mellowing of the East German state and the crumbling of the Wall have taken the West by surprise. The West German government has done little or no planning to absorb the refugees: it has left the task of resettlement to states, cities and private charity. "There is no real contingency plan for reunification" either, admits a Kohl confidant. Only in recent days has a small group been assigned to examine the reunification question, and it has not even been given office space.

Much will depend, of course, on whether, and how soon, Krenz delivers on his rhetoric of freedom. The conviction that they will be able to decide their future could indeed keep at home most East Germans who are now tempted to flee; it is difficult to see anything else that might. Until the opening of the Wall, however, Krenz's reformist inclinations had seemed ambiguous. For many years he had been a faithful follower of Honecker's, and as recently as September defended the Chinese government's bloody suppression of pro- democracy demonstrators in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. His conversion seemed sparked less by ideological conviction than by a desperate desire to cling to power in the face of street protest and refugee hemorrhage.

Even some of last week's moves were ambiguous. The mass resignation of the 44-member Cabinet was not so significant as it was dramatic, since the Cabinet had been a rubber stamp. Its dismissal, however, did serve to rid Krenz of Premier Willi Stoph, a Honecker loyalist. The dissolution of the 21-member Politburo, and its replacement with a slimmer ten-member body, was far more pointed, since that is where the real power lies. Some of its more notorious hard-liners got the ax, including Stoph; Erich Mielke, head of the despised state security apparatus; and Kurt Hager, chief party ideologist. Hans Modrow, 61, the Dresden party leader, was named to the Politburo and will be Premier in the new government. He has been likened alternately to Gorbachev and Boris Yeltsin, the reformist thorn in the Soviet President's side. Some conservatives, however, remain in the reshaped Politburo, and the way Krenz rammed his slate through the Central Committee was scarcely an exercise in democracy.

The initial reforms, in any case, did not satisfy the opposition. "Dialogue is not the main course, it is just the appetizer," proclaimed Jens Reich, a molecular biologist and leader of New Forum, the major dissident organization. Founded only in September, it claims 200,000 adherents and has just been recognized by the government, which originally declared it illegal. The opposition pledged to keep up the pressure for a free press, free elections and a new constitution stripped of the clause granting the Communist Party a monopoly on power.

The Central Committee responded in co-opting language. "The German Democratic Republic is in the midst of an awakening," it declared. "A revolutionary people's movement has brought into motion a process of great change." Besides underlining its commitment to free elections, the committee promised separation of the Communist Party from the state, a "socialist planned economy oriented to market conditions," legislative oversight of internal security, and freedom of press and assembly.

Thus, rhetorically at least, the opposition no longer gets an argument from the government. Gerhard Herder, East German Ambassador to the U.S., pledged reforms that "will radically change the structure and the way the G.D.R. will be governed. This development is irreversible. If there are still people alleging that all these changes are simply cosmetic, to grant the survival of the party, then let me say they are wrong."

Yesterday, with the Wall still locking people in, such talk might have been hard to believe. Today, with the barrier chipped, battered and permeable, it is a good deal easier to accept. In the end it does not matter whether Eastern Europe's Communists are reforming out of conviction or if, as one East German protest banner put it, THE PEOPLE LEAD -- THE PARTY LIMPS BEHIND. What does matter is that the grim, fearsome Wall, for almost three decades a marker for relentless oppression, has overnight become something far different, a symbol of the failure of regimentation to suppress the human yearning for freedom. Ambassador Herder declared that the Wall will soon "disappear" physically, but it might almost better be left up as a reminder that the flame of freedom is inextinguishable -- and that this time it burned brightly.

 
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Old 10-30-2008, 11:26 PM   #6
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A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
AAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAA AAA AA A
AAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAA AAA AA A
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A


AAAA

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A:

math

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A:

math

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
AAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAA

* A. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

A. AAAAAAAAAAAA
A. AAAAAAA
o AAAAAAAAAAAAAA

* AA. AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

A. AAAAAAAAAA
A. AAAAAAAAA

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A AAAAAAAA!!!!! A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A
A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A!
AAAAAA(A): AAAAA AA AAA AA AAAAAA AAAAA?
AAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAA AA AAAAA
AAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAA AA AAAAA

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A


A A A A A A A A A A A
AAAA AAAA AAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAA
AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA.
(AAAA AA AAAAAAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAA)

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A.
AA AA AA AA AA

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A!
Code:
            AAA                    AAA                    AAA          AAAAA  AAAAA
           AAAAA                  AAAAA                  AAAAA         AAAAA  AAAAA
          AAA AAA                AAA AAA                AAA AAA        AAAAA  AAAAA
         AAA   AAA              AAA   AAA              AAA   AAA       AAAAA  AAAAA
        AAA     AAA            AAA     AAA            AAA     AAA       AAA    AAA
       AAAAAAAAAAAAA          AAAAAAAAAAAAA          AAAAAAAAAAAAA      AAA    AAA
      AAA         AAA        AAA         AAA        AAA         AAA      
     AAA           AAA      AAA           AAA      AAA           AAA    AAA    AAA
    AAA             AAA    AAA             AAA    AAA             AAA  AAAAA  AAAAA
   AAA               AAA  AAA               AAA  AAA               AAA  AAA    AAA
AAAAA
AAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAA

A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A A.
AAAAAA AAAAAA (A.A.A AAAAAA AAAAAAAA)
AAAAAA!
AAAAAA!

AAAAAAA AA AAA AAAAAAAAA AAAAA AA AAAAAA AAAAAA, AAAAAAA AA AAAAAA AAAAAA, AAAAA AAAAAAA AAA! AA AAA AAAA AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAA AA AAAAAA AAAAA

* AAAA AAAA AAAAAA AA AAA!
* AAA AAAA AAAA AAA!
* AAAAAAA AAAAA AAA!
* AAAAA AAAA AAA!
* AAAA AAAAA AAA!
* AAA AAAAAA "A" AAAA AAA!

AAAAA AAA AAA, AAAAAAA AAA AAAA, AA AAAAAA AAAAAA, AAAA AAAAA AAA!


AAAA, AA AAAAAA AAAAAA, AAAA AAAA(A) AAA!
AA AAA AAAA AA AAAAA AAAAAAA AAAAAAA?

AAAAAAA AA AAAAAA AAAAAA , AAAAAA AAAAA AA AAAAA AAAA AAA!

AAAAAA, AA AAAAA AAAAAAAAA AAAAAAA, AAA AAAAAAA AAAAAAAA. (AA AAAAAA AAAAAA-AA, AAAAA AAAA.) AAAA, AA AAAA AAAAA'A AA AAA AAAAA, AAAA AAAA AA AAA AAA AAAAAAA, AAAAAAAAAAAA AAA AAAAA (AA AAAAAAA AA AA, AA, AA AAA), AA AAAAA AAAAAA AAAA AAA AA AAA AAA. AA AAAA AA AAA AAA AAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAAA.
AAAAA AAAAA

AAAAA AAAAA AAA AA AAAAAAA AAAA AAAAAA AAAAAA AAAAAAA



AAA AAAA

* AAAAA AAAAA
* AAAAAA AAAAA
* AAAAAA
* AAAAA AAAA
* AAAAA
* AAAA
* AAAA
* A
* ∀
* Ε
* AAAAAA
* AAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAA
* AAA

AAAAAAAA AAAAA

* AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
* AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
* A
* AAA
* AAAA AAAAAAAA AAAAA
* AAAAAAAAA!
* AAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!

 
Shallowed is offline
Old 10-30-2008, 11:28 PM   #7
theghostchild
Demi-God
 
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Location: The Home of Gish
Posts: 408
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nice! Hahahahahaha.
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theghostchild is offline
Old 10-31-2008, 12:18 AM   #8
ChaosEffect
Apocalyptic Poster
 
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Location: Rockin out over Endor Space
Posts: 1,376
Default

i am one as you are three
try to find a messiah in your trinity
your city to burn
your city to burn
try to look for something
in your city to burn, you'll burn
am i as i seem?
i'm down
down, so down

time is right for a guiding light
try to turn to reasons in your bitter life
your city to burn
your city to burn
try to look for something
in your city to burn, you'll burn

see you, don't you just want to
see you, i am one
see you, don't you just want to
see you
What you want is what you get
And thats nothing
What you want is what you get
And thats nothing
What you want is what you get
And you see is what you want and what you cannot have is what you desire
All I ever wanted was everything
All I ever wanted was everything
All I ever wanted was everything
All I ever wanted was everything
And all I ever got was shit
Nothing can be taking from that has not already been taken
And there are no stories that can be written that have not be written
And theres no amount of bullshit that can be stacked high
And theres no amount of daggers small enough to miss your heart
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
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Nothing!
STRAIGHT THROUGH THE MOTHER FUCKING HEART!
What you want is what you get and thats nothing
What you want is what you get and thats nothing
Nothing Nothing Nothing Nothing Nada
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
STRAIGHT THROUGH THE MOTHER FUCKING HEART!
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme Gimme
Nothing!
Nothing!
Nothing!
see you, don't you just want to
see you, i am one
see you, don't you just want to
see you, i am one

 
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Old 10-31-2008, 12:29 AM   #9
Shallowed
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Old 10-31-2008, 12:39 AM   #10
slunken
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for those keeping score at home right now it's all tied up...

 
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Old 10-31-2008, 04:40 AM   #11
Shallowed
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Doesn't matter anyway, both songs suck ass, except for Quiet.

 
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Old 10-31-2008, 03:04 PM   #12
Spira|_
Apocalyptic Poster
 
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Quiet by far!

 
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