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Old 06-10-2007, 05:13 AM   #31
Luke de Spa
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Studio
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For a one-room apartment, see Studio apartment.
For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine.
Look up studio in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Adriaen van Ostade. Self portrait. 1663. Gemäldegalerie.
Adriaen van Ostade. Self portrait. 1663. Gemäldegalerie.

A studio is an artist's workroom, or an artist and his or her employees who work within that studio. This can be for the purpose of painting, pottery (ceramics), sculpture, photography, cinematography, animation, radio or television broadcasting or the making of music.

The etymology for the word "studio" is derived from the Italian word, from Latin studium, from studere, meaning to study or zeal.

The French term for studio, atelier, in addition to designating an artist's studio is used to characterize the studio of a fashion designer. Atelier also has the connotation of being the home of an alchemist or wizard.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Art studio
* 2 Software studio
* 3 Production studios
o 3.1 Movie Studio
o 3.2 Animation studio
o 3.3 Comics studio
o 3.4 Recording studio
o 3.5 Television studio
o 3.6 Radio studio
o 3.7 Photographic studio
o 3.8 Mastering studio
o 3.9 Slang Uses

[edit] Art studio
Artist Jane Frank in her studio, 1960s or 1970s. The studio of a contemporary mixed media artist can be quite a messy affair.
Artist Jane Frank in her studio, 1960s or 1970s. The studio of a contemporary mixed media artist can be quite a messy affair.

The studio of a successful artist, especially from the 15th to the 19th centuries, characterized all the assistants, thus the designation of paintings as "from the workshop of..." or "studio of..." An art studio is sometimes called an atelier, especially in earlier eras. In contemporary, English language use, "atelier" can also refer to the Atelier Method, a training method for artists that usually takes place in a professional artist's studio.

Studio pottery is made by an individual potter working on his own in his studio, rather than in a ceramics factory (although there may be a design studio within a larger manufacturing site).

The term atelier also refers to a printmaking studio, where master printmakers, work collaboratively with painters & sculpters who want to make limited editions of their art using printing presses, such as lithography, gravure and screen printing.

[edit] Software studio

[edit] Production studios

Production studios are those studios which act as centres for the production in any of the arts; alternatively they can also be the financial and commercial entity behind such endeavours.

[edit] Movie Studio

Main article: Movie studio

A movie studio is a company which develops, equips and maintains a controlled environment for the making of a film. This environment may be interior (sound stage), exterior (backlot) or both.

[edit] Animation studio

Animation studios, like movie studios, may be production facilities, or financial entities. In some cases, especially in Anime they continue the tradition of a studio where a Master or group of talented individuals oversee the work of lesser artists and crafts persons in realising their vision.

[edit] Comics studio

Artists, predominantly those producing comics, still employ small studios of staff to assist in the creation of a comic strip, comic book or graphic novel. In the early days of Dan Dare, Frank Hampson employed a number of staff at his studio to help with the production of the strip. Eddie Campbell is another creator who has assembled a small studio of colleagues to help him in his art, and the comic book industry of the United States has based its production methods upon the studio system employed at its beginnings.

[edit] Recording studio

Main article: Recording studio

A recording studio is a facility for sound recording which generally consists of at least two rooms: the studio or live room, and the control room, where the sound from the studio is recorded and manipulated. designed so that they have good acoustics and that there is good isolation between the rooms.

[edit] Television studio

Main article: Television studio

A television studio is an installation in which television or video productions take place, either for live television, for recording live on tape, or for the acquisition of raw footage for postproduction. The design of a studio is similar to, and derived from, movie studios, with a few amendments for the special requirements of television production. A professional television studio generally has several rooms, which are kept separate for noise and practicality reasons.

[edit] Radio studio

A radio studio is a room in which a radio program or show is produced, either for live broadcast or for recording for a later broadcast. The room is soundproofed to avoid unwanted noise being mixed into the broadcast.

[edit] Photographic studio

Main article: Photographic studio

A photographic studio is both a workspace and a corporate body. As a workspace it provides space to take, develop, print and duplicate photographs.

[edit] Mastering studio

An audio/video recording studio specialized in the post-production stage for musical and/or video recordings (After the initial, first/rough draft or mix recording is complete).

Tasks may ******* but not be limited to: editing, mixing, video post-production and audio mastering, to produce a finished version ready for broadcast, replication and digital distribution. In music applications, a mastering studio may use different types of equipment and tools than the traditional production studios like: a frequency spectrum analyzer for accurate frequency band measurement, a phase scope to gauge stereo depth, etc.


[edit] Slang Uses

Main article: Slang

Most recently the term studio has been popular among the youth as a slang term.(for example) One boy tells a friend that he has come up with an amazing idea, the boy tells the friend the idea, the friend doesn't like the idea and may tell the boy, "I ain't feelin that shit man you gotta take that shit back to the studio or somethin." Basically what the friend is saying is that the boy needs to take his idea and work on it in a sarcastic manner. The line can be shortened with just the word Studio, however it is mostly used as an inside joke.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studio"

Categories: Arts | Rooms

Information
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards.
Please discuss this issue on the talk page or replace this tag with a more specific message.
This article has been tagged since April 2007.
The ASCII codes for the word "Wikipedia" represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information.
The ASCII codes for the word "Wikipedia" represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information.
For other uses, see Information (disambiguation).

Information is the result of processing, manipulating and organizing data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the receiver. In other words, it is the context in which data is taken.[citation needed]

Information as a concept bears a diversity of meanings, from everyday usage to technical settings. Generally speaking, the concept of information is closely related to notions of constraint, communication, control, data, form, instruction, knowledge, meaning, mental stimulus, pattern, perception, and representation.

Many people speak about the Information Age as the advent of the Knowledge Age[citation needed][Who says this?] or knowledge society, the information society, and information technologies, and even though informatics, information science and computer science are often in the spotlight, the word "information" is often used without careful consideration of the various meanings it has acquired.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Information as a message
o 1.1 Measuring information entropy
* 2 Information as a pattern
* 3 Information as sensory input
* 4 Information as an influence which leads to a transformation
* 5 Information as a property in physics
* 6 Etymology
* 7 Information as Records
* 8 References
* 9 See also
* 10 External links

[edit] Information as a message

Information is the state of a system of interest (curiosity). Message is the information materialized.

Information is a quality of a message from a sender to one or more receivers. Information is always about something (size of a parameter, occurrence of an event, …). Viewed in this manner, information does not have to be accurate. It may be a truth or a lie, or just the sound of a kiss. Even a disruptive noise used to inhibit the flow of communication and create misunderstanding would in this view be a form of information. However, generally speaking, if the amount of information in the received message increases the more accurate the message is.

This model assumes there is a definite sender and at least one receiver. Many refinements of the model assume the existence of a common language understood by the sender and at least one of the receivers. An important variation identifies information as that which would be communicated by a message if it were sent from a sender to a receiver capable of understanding the message. However, in requiring the existence of a definite sender, the "information as a message" model does not attach any significance to the idea that information is something that can be extracted from an environment, e.g., through observation, reading or measurement.

Information is a term with many meanings depending on context, but is as a rule closely related to such concepts as meaning, knowledge, instruction, communication, representation, and mental stimulus. Simply stated, Information is a message received and understood. In terms of data, it can be defined as a collection of facts from which conclusions may be drawn. There are many other aspects of information since it is the knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction. But overall, information is the result of processing, manipulating and organizing data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the person receiving it.

Communication theory is a numerical measure of the uncertainty of an outcome, for example, we can say that "the signal contained thousands of bits of information". Communication theory tends to use the concept of information entropy, generally attributed to C.E. Shannon (see below).

Another form of information is the Fisher information, a concept of R.A. Fisher. This is used in application of statistics to estimation theory and to science in general. Fisher information is thought of as the amount of information that a message carries about an unobservable parameter. It can be computed from knowledge of the likelihood function defining the system. For example, with a normal likelihood function, the Fisher information is the reciprocal of the variance of the law. In the absence of knowledge of the likelihood law, the Fisher information may be computed from normally distributed score data as the reciprocal of their second moment.

Even though information and data are often used interchangeably, they are actually very different. Data is a set of unrelated information, and as such is of no use until it is properly evaluated. Upon evaluation, once there is some significant relation between data, and they show some relevance, then it is converted into information. Now this same data can be used for different purposes. Thus, till the data convey some information, they are not useful.

[edit] Measuring information entropy

The view of information as a message came into prominence with the publication in 1948 of an influential paper by Claude Shannon, "A Mathematical Theory of Communication." This paper provides the foundations of information theory and endows the word information not only with a technical meaning but also a measure. If the sending device is equally likely to send any one of a set of N messages, then the preferred measure of "the information produced when one message is chosen from the set" is the base two logarithm of N (This measure is called self-information). In this paper, Shannon continues:

The choice of a logarithmic base corresponds to the choice of a unit for measuring information. If the base 2 is used the resulting units may be called binary digits, or more briefly bits, a word suggested by J. W. Tukey. A device with two stable positions, such as a relay or a flip-flop circuit, can store one bit of information. N such devices can store N bits…[1]

A complementary way of measuring information is provided by Algorithmic information theory. In brief, this measures the information content of a list of symbols based on how predictable they are, or more specifically how easy it is to generate the list. The sequence below would have a very low algorithmic information measurement since it is a very predictable pattern, and as the pattern continues the measurement would not change. Shannon information would give the same information measurement for each symbol, since they are statistically random, and each new symbol would increase the measurement.

123456789101112131415161718192021

It is important to recognise the limitations of Shannon's work from the perspective of human meaning. When referring to the meaning content of a message Shannon noted “Frequently the messages have meaning… these semantic aspects of communication are irrelevant to the engineering problem. The significant aspect is that the actual message is one selected from a set of possible messages” (emphasis in original).

In Information Theory signals are part of a process, not a substance, they do something, they do not contain any specific meaning. Combining Algorithmic information theory and Information Theory we can conclude that the most random signal contains the most information as it can be interpreted in any way and cannot be compressed.

Micheal Reddy noted that “signals” of the mathematical theory are “patterns that can be exchanged”. There is no message contained in the signal, the signals covey the ability to select from a set of possible messages.” In information theory “the system must be designed to operate for each possible selection, not just the one which will actually be chosen since this is unknown at the time of design.

[edit] Information as a pattern

Information is any represented pattern. This view assumes neither accuracy nor directly communicating parties, but instead assumes a separation between an object and its representation, as well as the involvement of someone capable of understanding this relationship. This view seems therefore to require a conscious mind. Consider the following example: economic statistics represent an economy, however inaccurately. What are commonly referred to as data in computing, statistics, and other fields, are forms of information in this sense. The electro-magnetic patterns in a computer network and connected devices are related to something other than the pattern itself, such as text characters to be displayed and keyboard input. Signals, signs, and symbols are also in this category. On the other hand, according to semiotics, data is symbols with certain syntax and information is data with a certain semantic. Painting and drawing contain information to the extent that they represent something such as an assortment of objects on a table, a profile, or a landscape. In other words, when a pattern of something is transposed to a pattern of something else, the latter is information. This type of information still assumes some involvement of conscious mind, of either the entity constructing the representation, or the entity interpreting it.

If you accept that information can be defined merely as a pattern, does it not follow that neither utility nor meaning are necessary components of information? Surely a distinction must be made between raw unprocessed data and information which possesses utility, value or some quantum of meaning. Information may indeed be characterised as a pattern; it is a necessary condition, but not sufficient.

An individual entry in a telephone book, which follows a specific pattern formed by name, address and telephone number, does not become "informative" in some sense unless and until it possesses some degree of utility, value or meaning. For example, someone might look up a girlfriend's number, might order a take away etc. The vast majority of numbers will never be construed as "information" in any meaningful sense. The gap between data and information is only closed by a behavioural bridge whereby some value, utility or meaning is added to transform mere data or pattern into information.

When one constructs a representation of an object, one can selectively extract from the object (sampling) or use a system of signs to replace (encoding), or both. The sampling and encoding result in representation. An example of the former is a "sample" of a product; an example of the latter is "verbal description" of a product. Both contain information of the product, however inaccurate. When one interprets representation, one can predict a broader pattern from a limited number of observations (inference) or understand the relation between patterns of two different things (decoding). One example of the former is to sip a soup to know if it is spoiled; an example of the latter is examining footprints to determine the animal and its condition. In both cases, information sources are not constructed or presented by some "sender" of information. To repeat, information in this sense does not assume direct communication, but it assumes involvement of some conscious mind.

Regardless, information is dependent upon, but usually unrelated to and separate from, the medium or media used to express it. In other words, the position of a theoretical series of bits, or even the output once interpreted by a computer or similar device, is unimportant, except when someone or something is present to interpret the information. Therefore, a quantity of information is totally distinct from its medium.

[edit] Information as sensory input

Often information is viewed as a type of input to an organism or designed device. Inputs are of two kinds. Some inputs are important to the function of the organism (for example, food) or device (energy) by themselves. In his book Sensory Ecology, Dusenbery called these causal inputs. Other inputs (information) are important only because they are associated with causal inputs and can be used to predict the occurrence of a causal input at a later time (and perhaps another place). Some information is important because of association with other information but eventually there must be a connection to a causal input. In practice, information is usually carried by weak stimuli that must be detected by specialized sensory systems and amplified by energy inputs before they can be functional to the organism or device. For example, light is often a causal input to plants but provides information to animals. The colored light reflected from a flower is too weak to do much photosynthetic work but the visual system of the bee detects it and the bee's nervous system uses the information to guide the bee to the flower, where the bee often finds nectar or pollen, which are causal inputs, serving a nutritional function.

Information is any type of sensory input. When an organism with a nervous system receives an input, it transforms the input into an electrical signal. This is regarded information by some. The idea of representation is still relevant, but in a slightly different manner. That is, while abstract painting does not represent anything concretely, when the viewer sees the painting, it is nevertheless transformed into electrical signals that create a representation of the painting. Defined this way, information does not have to be related to truth, communication, or representation of an object. Entertainment in general is not intended to be informative. Music, the performing arts, amusement parks, works of fiction and so on are thus forms of information in this sense, but they are not forms of information according to the previous definitions above. Consider another example: food supplies both nutrition and taste for those who eat it. If information is equated to sensory input, then nutrition is not information but taste is.

[edit] Information as an influence which leads to a transformation

Information is any type of pattern that influences the formation or transformation of other patterns. In this sense, there is no need for a conscious mind to perceive, much less appreciate, the pattern. Consider, for example, DNA. The sequence of nucleotides is a pattern that influences the formation and development of an organism without any need for a conscious mind. Systems theory at times seems to refer to information in this sense, assuming information does not necessarily involve any conscious mind, and patterns circulating (due to feedback) in the system can be called information. In other words, it can be said that information in this sense is something potentially perceived as representation, though not created or presented for that purpose.

When Marshall McLuhan speaks of media and their effects on human cultures, he refers to the structure of artifacts that in turn shape our behaviors and mindsets. Also, pheromones are often said to be "information" in this sense.

In 2003, J. D. Bekenstein claimed there is a growing trend in physics to define the physical world as being made of information itself (and thus information is defined in this way).

See the section below on information as a property in physics. (Also see Gregory Bateson.)

[edit] Information as a property in physics

Main article: Physical information

Information has a well defined meaning in physics. Examples of this ******* the phenomenon of quantum entanglement where particles can interact without reference to their separation or the speed of light. Information itself cannot travel faster than light even if the information is transmitted indirectly. This could lead to the fact that all attempts at physically observing a particle with an "entangled" relationship to another are slowed down, even though the particles are not connected in any other way other than by the information they carry.

Another link is demonstrated by the Maxwell's demon thought experiment. In this experiment, a direct relationship between information and another physical property, entropy, is demonstrated. A consequence is that it is impossible to destroy information without increasing the entropy of a system; in practical terms this often means generating heat. Thus, in the study of logic gates, the theoretical lower bound of thermal energy released by an AND gate is more than for the NOT gate (because information is destroyed in an AND gate and simply converted in a NOT gate). Physical information is of particular importance in the theory of quantum computers.

[edit] Etymology

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the earliest historical meaning of the word information in English was the act of informing, or giving form or shape to the mind, as in education, instruction, or training. A quote from 1387: "Five books come down from heaven for information of mankind." It was also used for an item of training, e.g. a particular instruction. "Melibee had heard the great skills and reasons of Dame Prudence, and her wise information and techniques." (1386)

The English word was apparently derived by adding the common "noun of action" ending "-ation" (descended through French from Latin "-tio") to the earlier verb to inform, in the sense of to give form to the mind, to discipline, instruct, teach: "Men so wise should go and inform their kings." (1330) Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb informare, to give form to, to form an idea of. Furthermore, Latin itself already even contained the word informatio meaning concept or idea, but the extent to which this may have influenced the development of the word information in English is unclear.

As a final note, the ancient Greek word for form was eidos, and this word was famously used in a technical philosophical sense by Plato (and later Aristotle) to denote the ideal identity or essence of something (see The Forms).

[edit] Information as Records

Records are a specialized form of information. Essentially records are information produced as by-products of business activities or transactions or consciously as a record of such activities or transactions and retained because of their value. Primarily the value is as evidence of the activities of the organization but they may also be retained for their informational value. Sound Records management ensures that the integrity of records is preserved for as long as they are required.

The international standard on Records management, ISO 15489, defines records as "information created, received, and maintained as evidence and information by an organization or person, in pursuance of legal obligations or in the transaction of business". The International Committee on Archives (ICA) Committee on electronic records defined a record as, "a specific piece of recorded information generated, collected or received in the initiation, conduct or completion of an activity and that comprises sufficient content, context and structure to provide proof or evidence of that activity".

Records may be retained because of their business value, as part of the Corporate memory of the organization or to meet legal, fiscal or accountability requirements imposed on the organization. Willis (2005) expressed the view that sound management of business records and information delivered “…six key requirements for good Corporate governance … transparency; accountability; due process; compliance; meeting statutory and common law requirements; and security of personal and corporate information.

[edit] References

1. [The Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 27, p. 379, (July 1948).

Look up Information in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

* Bekenstein, Jacob D. (2003, August). Information in the holographic universe. Scientific American. Retrieved from http://www.referencenter.com

* Luciano Floridi, (2005). 'Is Information Meaningful Data?', Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 70 (2), pp. 351 - 370. Available online at http://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/~floridi/pdf/iimd.pdf

* Luciano Floridi, (2005). 'Semantic Conceptions of Information', The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.). Available online at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/information-semantic/

[edit] See also

* Informatics
* Information architecture
* Information broker
* Information entropy
* Information geometry
* Information highway
* Information mapping
* Information overload
* Information processing
* Information processor
* Information sensitivity
* Information science
* Information system
* Information technology
* Information theory
* Infosphere
* Accuracy
* Abstraction
* Algorithmic information theory



* Classified information
* Complexity
o Complex system
o Complex adaptive system
* Cybernetics
* Exformation
* Fisher information
* Free Information Infrastructure
* Freedom of information
* Infornography
* Library and Information Science
* Medium



* Metadata
* Observation
* Philosophy of information
* Physical information
* Prediction
* Propaganda model
* Relevance
* Receiver operating characteristic
* Satisficing
* Shannon–Hartley theorem
o Claude Shannon
o Ralph Hartley
* Systems theory

[hide]
v • d • e
Major fields of technology
Applied science Artificial intelligence • Ceramic engineering • Computing technology • Electronics • Energy • Energy storage • Engineering physics • Environmental technology • Materials science & engineering • Microtechnology • Nanotechnology • Nuclear technology • Optical engineering
Information and communication Communication • Graphics • Music technology • Speech recognition • Visual technology
Industry Construction • Financial engineering • Manufacturing • Machinery • Mining
Military Bombs • Guns and Ammunition • Military technology and equipment • Naval engineering

Domestic Domestic appliances • Domestic technology • Educational technology • Food technology
Engineering Aerospace • Agricultural • Architectural • Bioengineering • Biochemical • Biomedical • Ceramic • Chemical • Civil • Computer • Construction • Electrical • Electronic • Environmental • Industrial • Materials • Mechanical • Mechatronics • Metallurgical • Mining • Naval • Nuclear • Petroleum • Software • Structural • Systems • Textile • Tissue
Health and safety Biomedical engineering • Bioinformatics • Biotechnology • Cheminformatics • Fire protection technology • Health technologies • Pharmaceuticals • Safety engineering • Sanitary engineering
Transport Aerospace • Aerospace engineering • Marine engineering • Motor vehicles • Space technology • Transport

[edit] External links

* Semantic Conceptions of Information Review by Luciano Floridi for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
* Principia Cybernetica entry on negentropy
* Fisher Information, a New Paradigm for Science: Introduction, Uncertainty principles, Wave equations, Ideas of Escher, Kant, Plato and Wheeler. This essay is continually revised in the light of ongoing research.
* Information, Consciousness & Health
* How Much Information? 2003 an attempt to estimate how much new information is created each year (study was produced by faculty and students at the School of Information Management and Systems at the University of California at Berkeley.)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information"

Categories: Cleanup from April 2007 | All pages needing cleanup | Articles with unsourced statements since April 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | Articles w

Exactly.

Studio
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For a one-room apartment, see Studio apartment.
For the illustrated magazine, see Studio Magazine.
Look up studio in Wiktionary, the free dictionary.
Adriaen van Ostade. Self portrait. 1663. Gemäldegalerie.
Adriaen van Ostade. Self portrait. 1663. Gemäldegalerie.

A studio is an artist's workroom, or an artist and his or her employees who work within that studio. This can be for the purpose of painting, pottery (ceramics), sculpture, photography, cinematography, animation, radio or television broadcasting or the making of music.

The etymology for the word "studio" is derived from the Italian word, from Latin studium, from studere, meaning to study or zeal.

The French term for studio, atelier, in addition to designating an artist's studio is used to characterize the studio of a fashion designer. Atelier also has the connotation of being the home of an alchemist or wizard.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Art studio
* 2 Software studio
* 3 Production studios
o 3.1 Movie Studio
o 3.2 Animation studio
o 3.3 Comics studio
o 3.4 Recording studio
o 3.5 Television studio
o 3.6 Radio studio
o 3.7 Photographic studio
o 3.8 Mastering studio
o 3.9 Slang Uses

[edit] Art studio
Artist Jane Frank in her studio, 1960s or 1970s. The studio of a contemporary mixed media artist can be quite a messy affair.
Artist Jane Frank in her studio, 1960s or 1970s. The studio of a contemporary mixed media artist can be quite a messy affair.

The studio of a successful artist, especially from the 15th to the 19th centuries, characterized all the assistants, thus the designation of paintings as "from the workshop of..." or "studio of..." An art studio is sometimes called an atelier, especially in earlier eras. In contemporary, English language use, "atelier" can also refer to the Atelier Method, a training method for artists that usually takes place in a professional artist's studio.

Studio pottery is made by an individual potter working on his own in his studio, rather than in a ceramics factory (although there may be a design studio within a larger manufacturing site).

The term atelier also refers to a printmaking studio, where master printmakers, work collaboratively with painters & sculpters who want to make limited editions of their art using printing presses, such as lithography, gravure and screen printing.

[edit] Software studio

[edit] Production studios

Production studios are those studios which act as centres for the production in any of the arts; alternatively they can also be the financial and commercial entity behind such endeavours.

[edit] Movie Studio

Main article: Movie studio

A movie studio is a company which develops, equips and maintains a controlled environment for the making of a film. This environment may be interior (sound stage), exterior (backlot) or both.

[edit] Animation studio

Animation studios, like movie studios, may be production facilities, or financial entities. In some cases, especially in Anime they continue the tradition of a studio where a Master or group of talented individuals oversee the work of lesser artists and crafts persons in realising their vision.

[edit] Comics studio

Artists, predominantly those producing comics, still employ small studios of staff to assist in the creation of a comic strip, comic book or graphic novel. In the early days of Dan Dare, Frank Hampson employed a number of staff at his studio to help with the production of the strip. Eddie Campbell is another creator who has assembled a small studio of colleagues to help him in his art, and the comic book industry of the United States has based its production methods upon the studio system employed at its beginnings.

[edit] Recording studio

Main article: Recording studio

A recording studio is a facility for sound recording which generally consists of at least two rooms: the studio or live room, and the control room, where the sound from the studio is recorded and manipulated. designed so that they have good acoustics and that there is good isolation between the rooms.

[edit] Television studio

Main article: Television studio

A television studio is an installation in which television or video productions take place, either for live television, for recording live on tape, or for the acquisition of raw footage for postproduction. The design of a studio is similar to, and derived from, movie studios, with a few amendments for the special requirements of television production. A professional television studio generally has several rooms, which are kept separate for noise and practicality reasons.

[edit] Radio studio

A radio studio is a room in which a radio program or show is produced, either for live broadcast or for recording for a later broadcast. The room is soundproofed to avoid unwanted noise being mixed into the broadcast.

[edit] Photographic studio

Main article: Photographic studio

A photographic studio is both a workspace and a corporate body. As a workspace it provides space to take, develop, print and duplicate photographs.

[edit] Mastering studio

An audio/video recording studio specialized in the post-production stage for musical and/or video recordings (After the initial, first/rough draft or mix recording is complete).

Tasks may ******* but not be limited to: editing, mixing, video post-production and audio mastering, to produce a finished version ready for broadcast, replication and digital distribution. In music applications, a mastering studio may use different types of equipment and tools than the traditional production studios like: a frequency spectrum analyzer for accurate frequency band measurement, a phase scope to gauge stereo depth, etc.


[edit] Slang Uses

Main article: Slang

Most recently the term studio has been popular among the youth as a slang term.(for example) One boy tells a friend that he has come up with an amazing idea, the boy tells the friend the idea, the friend doesn't like the idea and may tell the boy, "I ain't feelin that shit man you gotta take that shit back to the studio or somethin." Basically what the friend is saying is that the boy needs to take his idea and work on it in a sarcastic manner. The line can be shortened with just the word Studio, however it is mostly used as an inside joke.
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Studio"

Categories: Arts | Rooms

Information
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article may require cleanup to meet Wikipedia's quality standards.
Please discuss this issue on the talk page or replace this tag with a more specific message.
This article has been tagged since April 2007.
The ASCII codes for the word "Wikipedia" represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information.
The ASCII codes for the word "Wikipedia" represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information.
For other uses, see Information (disambiguation).

Information is the result of processing, manipulating and organizing data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the receiver. In other words, it is the context in which data is taken.[citation needed]

Information as a concept bears a diversity of meanings, from everyday usage to technical settings. Generally speaking, the concept of information is closely related to notions of constraint, communication, control, data, form, instruction, knowledge, meaning, mental stimulus, pattern, perception, and representation.

Many people speak about the Information Age as the advent of the Knowledge Age[citation needed][Who says this?] or knowledge society, the information society, and information technologies, and even though informatics, information science and computer science are often in the spotlight, the word "information" is often used without careful consideration of the various meanings it has acquired.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Information as a message
o 1.1 Measuring information entropy
* 2 Information as a pattern
* 3 Information as sensory input
* 4 Information as an influence which leads to a transformation
* 5 Information as a property in physics
* 6 Etymology
* 7 Information as Records
* 8 References
* 9 See also
* 10 External links

[edit] Information as a message

Information is the state of a system of interest (curiosity). Message is the information materialized.

Information is a quality of a message from a sender to one or more receivers. Information is always about something (size of a parameter, occurrence of an event, …). Viewed in this manner, information does not have to be accurate. It may be a truth or a lie, or just the sound of a kiss. Even a disruptive noise used to inhibit the flow of communication and create misunderstanding would in this view be a form of information. However, generally speaking, if the amount of information in the received message increases the more accurate the message is.

This model assumes there is a definite sender and at least one receiver. Many refinements of the model assume the existence of a common language understood by the sender and at least one of the receivers. An important variation identifies information as that which would be communicated by a message if it were sent from a sender to a receiver capable of understanding the message. However, in requiring the existence of a definite sender, the "information as a message" model does not attach any significance to the idea that information is something that can be extracted from an environment, e.g., through observation, reading or measurement.

Information is a term with many meanings depending on context, but is as a rule closely related to such concepts as meaning, knowledge, instruction, communication, representation, and mental stimulus. Simply stated, Information is a message received and understood. In terms of data, it can be defined as a collection of facts from which conclusions may be drawn. There are many other aspects of information since it is the knowledge acquired through study or experience or instruction. But overall, information is the result of processing, manipulating and organizing data in a way that adds to the knowledge of the person receiving it.

Communication theory is a numerical measure of the uncertainty of an outcome, for example, we can say that "the signal contained thousands of bits of information". Communication theory tends to use the concept of information entropy, generally attributed to C.E. Shannon (see below).

Another form of information is the Fisher information, a concept of R.A. Fisher. This is used in application of statistics to estimation theory and to science in general. Fisher information is thought of as the amount of information that a message carries about an unobservable parameter. It can be computed from knowledge of the likelihood function defining the system. For example, with a normal likelihood function, the Fisher information is the reciprocal of the variance of the law. In the absence of knowledge of the likelihood law, the Fisher information may be computed from normally distributed score data as the reciprocal of their second moment.

Even though information and data are often used interchangeably, they are actually very different. Data is a set of unrelated information, and as such is of no use until it is properly evaluated. Upon evaluation, once there is some significant relation between data, and they show some relevance, then it is converted into information. Now this same data can be used for different purposes. Thus, till the data convey some information, they are not useful.

[edit] Measuring information entropy

The view of information as a message came into prominence with the publication in 1948 of an influential paper by Claude Shannon, "A Mathematical Theory of Communication." This paper provides the foundations of information theory and endows the word information not only with a technical meaning but also a measure. If the sending device is equally likely to send any one of a set of N messages, then the preferred measure of "the information produced when one message is chosen from the set" is the base two logarithm of N (This measure is called self-information). In this paper, Shannon continues:

The choice of a logarithmic base corresponds to the choice of a unit for measuring information. If the base 2 is used the resulting units may be called binary digits, or more briefly bits, a word suggested by J. W. Tukey. A device with two stable positions, such as a relay or a flip-flop circuit, can store one bit of information. N such devices can store N bits…[1]

A complementary way of measuring information is provided by Algorithmic information theory. In brief, this measures the information content of a list of symbols based on how predictable they are, or more specifically how easy it is to generate the list. The sequence below would have a very low algorithmic information measurement since it is a very predictable pattern, and as the pattern continues the measurement would not change. Shannon information would give the same information measurement for each symbol, since they are statistically random, and each new symbol would increase the measurement.

123456789101112131415161718192021

It is important to recognise the limitations of Shannon's work from the perspective of human meaning. When referring to the meaning content of a message Shannon noted “Frequently the messages have meaning… these semantic aspects of communication are irrelevant to the engineering problem. The significant aspect is that the actual message is one selected from a set of possible messages” (emphasis in original).

In Information Theory signals are part of a process, not a substance, they do something, they do not contain any specific meaning. Combining Algorithmic information theory and Information Theory we can conclude that the most random signal contains the most information as it can be interpreted in any way and cannot be compressed.

Micheal Reddy noted that “signals” of the mathematical theory are “patterns that can be exchanged”. There is no message contained in the signal, the signals covey the ability to select from a set of possible messages.” In information theory “the system must be designed to operate for each possible selection, not just the one which will actually be chosen since this is unknown at the time of design.

[edit] Information as a pattern

Information is any represented pattern. This view assumes neither accuracy nor directly communicating parties, but instead assumes a separation between an object and its representation, as well as the involvement of someone capable of understanding this relationship. This view seems therefore to require a conscious mind. Consider the following example: economic statistics represent an economy, however inaccurately. What are commonly referred to as data in computing, statistics, and other fields, are forms of information in this sense. The electro-magnetic patterns in a computer network and connected devices are related to something other than the pattern itself, such as text characters to be displayed and keyboard input. Signals, signs, and symbols are also in this category. On the other hand, according to semiotics, data is symbols with certain syntax and information is data with a certain semantic. Painting and drawing contain information to the extent that they represent something such as an assortment of objects on a table, a profile, or a landscape. In other words, when a pattern of something is transposed to a pattern of something else, the latter is information. This type of information still assumes some involvement of conscious mind, of either the entity constructing the representation, or the entity interpreting it.

If you accept that information can be defined merely as a pattern, does it not follow that neither utility nor meaning are necessary components of information? Surely a distinction must be made between raw unprocessed data and information which possesses utility, value or some quantum of meaning. Information may indeed be characterised as a pattern; it is a necessary condition, but not sufficient.

An individual entry in a telephone book, which follows a specific pattern formed by name, address and telephone number, does not become "informative" in some sense unless and until it possesses some degree of utility, value or meaning. For example, someone might look up a girlfriend's number, might order a take away etc. The vast majority of numbers will never be construed as "information" in any meaningful sense. The gap between data and information is only closed by a behavioural bridge whereby some value, utility or meaning is added to transform mere data or pattern into information.

When one constructs a representation of an object, one can selectively extract from the object (sampling) or use a system of signs to replace (encoding), or both. The sampling and encoding result in representation. An example of the former is a "sample" of a product; an example of the latter is "verbal description" of a product. Both contain information of the product, however inaccurate. When one interprets representation, one can predict a broader pattern from a limited number of observations (inference) or understand the relation between patterns of two different things (decoding). One example of the former is to sip a soup to know if it is spoiled; an example of the latter is examining footprints to determine the animal and its condition. In both cases, information sources are not constructed or presented by some "sender" of information. To repeat, information in this sense does not assume direct communication, but it assumes involvement of some conscious mind.

Regardless, information is dependent upon, but usually unrelated to and separate from, the medium or media used to express it. In other words, the position of a theoretical series of bits, or even the output once interpreted by a computer or similar device, is unimportant, except when someone or something is present to interpret the information. Therefore, a quantity of information is totally distinct from its medium.

[edit] Information as sensory input

Often information is viewed as a type of input to an organism or designed device. Inputs are of two kinds. Some inputs are important to the function of the organism (for example, food) or device (energy) by themselves. In his book Sensory Ecology, Dusenbery called these causal inputs. Other inputs (information) are important only because they are associated with causal inputs and can be used to predict the occurrence of a causal input at a later time (and perhaps another place). Some information is important because of association with other information but eventually there must be a connection to a causal input. In practice, information is usually carried by weak stimuli that must be detected by specialized sensory systems and amplified by energy inputs before they can be functional to the organism or device. For example, light is often a causal input to plants but provides information to animals. The colored light reflected from a flower is too weak to do much photosynthetic work but the visual system of the bee detects it and the bee's nervous system uses the information to guide the bee to the flower, where the bee often finds nectar or pollen, which are causal inputs, serving a nutritional function.

Information is any type of sensory input. When an organism with a nervous system receives an input, it transforms the input into an electrical signal. This is regarded information by some. The idea of representation is still relevant, but in a slightly different manner. That is, while abstract painting does not represent anything concretely, when the viewer sees the painting, it is nevertheless transformed into electrical signals that create a representation of the painting. Defined this way, information does not have to be related to truth, communication, or representation of an object. Entertainment in general is not intended to be informative. Music, the performing arts, amusement parks, works of fiction and so on are thus forms of information in this sense, but they are not forms of information according to the previous definitions above. Consider another example: food supplies both nutrition and taste for those who eat it. If information is equated to sensory input, then nutrition is not information but taste is.

[edit] Information as an influence which leads to a transformation

Information is any type of pattern that influences the formation or transformation of other patterns. In this sense, there is no need for a conscious mind to perceive, much less appreciate, the pattern. Consider, for example, DNA. The sequence of nucleotides is a pattern that influences the formation and development of an organism without any need for a conscious mind. Systems theory at times seems to refer to information in this sense, assuming information does not necessarily involve any conscious mind, and patterns circulating (due to feedback) in the system can be called information. In other words, it can be said that information in this sense is something potentially perceived as representation, though not created or presented for that purpose.

When Marshall McLuhan speaks of media and their effects on human cultures, he refers to the structure of artifacts that in turn shape our behaviors and mindsets. Also, pheromones are often said to be "information" in this sense.

In 2003, J. D. Bekenstein claimed there is a growing trend in physics to define the physical world as being made of information itself (and thus information is defined in this way).

See the section below on information as a property in physics. (Also see Gregory Bateson.)

[edit] Information as a property in physics

Main article: Physical information

Information has a well defined meaning in physics. Examples of this ******* the phenomenon of quantum entanglement where particles can interact without reference to their separation or the speed of light. Information itself cannot travel faster than light even if the information is transmitted indirectly. This could lead to the fact that all attempts at physically observing a particle with an "entangled" relationship to another are slowed down, even though the particles are not connected in any other way other than by the information they carry.

Another link is demonstrated by the Maxwell's demon thought experiment. In this experiment, a direct relationship between information and another physical property, entropy, is demonstrated. A consequence is that it is impossible to destroy information without increasing the entropy of a system; in practical terms this often means generating heat. Thus, in the study of logic gates, the theoretical lower bound of thermal energy released by an AND gate is more than for the NOT gate (because information is destroyed in an AND gate and simply converted in a NOT gate). Physical information is of particular importance in the theory of quantum computers.

[edit] Etymology

According to the Oxford English Dictionary, the earliest historical meaning of the word information in English was the act of informing, or giving form or shape to the mind, as in education, instruction, or training. A quote from 1387: "Five books come down from heaven for information of mankind." It was also used for an item of training, e.g. a particular instruction. "Melibee had heard the great skills and reasons of Dame Prudence, and her wise information and techniques." (1386)

The English word was apparently derived by adding the common "noun of action" ending "-ation" (descended through French from Latin "-tio") to the earlier verb to inform, in the sense of to give form to the mind, to discipline, instruct, teach: "Men so wise should go and inform their kings." (1330) Inform itself comes (via French) from the Latin verb informare, to give form to, to form an idea of. Furthermore, Latin itself already even contained the word informatio meaning concept or idea, but the extent to which this may have influenced the development of the word information in English is unclear.

As a final note, the ancient Greek word for form was eidos, and this word was famously used in a technical philosophical sense by Plato (and later Aristotle) to denote the ideal identity or essence of something (see The Forms).

[edit] Information as Records

Records are a specialized form of information. Essentially records are information produced as by-products of business activities or transactions or consciously as a record of such activities or transactions and retained because of their value. Primarily the value is as evidence of the activities of the organization but they may also be retained for their informational value. Sound Records management ensures that the integrity of records is preserved for as long as they are required.

The international standard on Records management, ISO 15489, defines records as "information created, received, and maintained as evidence and information by an organization or person, in pursuance of legal obligations or in the transaction of business". The International Committee on Archives (ICA) Committee on electronic records defined a record as, "a specific piece of recorded information generated, collected or received in the initiation, conduct or completion of an activity and that comprises sufficient content, context and structure to provide proof or evidence of that activity".

Records may be retained because of their business value, as part of the Corporate memory of the organization or to meet legal, fiscal or accountability requirements imposed on the organization. Willis (2005) expressed the view that sound management of business records and information delivered “…six key requirements for good Corporate governance … transparency; accountability; due process; compliance; meeting statutory and common law requirements; and security of personal and corporate information.

[edit] References

1. [The Bell System Technical Journal, Vol. 27, p. 379, (July 1948).

Look up Information in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

* Bekenstein, Jacob D. (2003, August). Information in the holographic universe. Scientific American. Retrieved from http://www.referencenter.com

* Luciano Floridi, (2005). 'Is Information Meaningful Data?', Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, 70 (2), pp. 351 - 370. Available online at http://www.wolfson.ox.ac.uk/~floridi/pdf/iimd.pdf

* Luciano Floridi, (2005). 'Semantic Conceptions of Information', The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (Winter 2005 Edition), Edward N. Zalta (ed.). Available online at http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/information-semantic/

[edit] See also

* Informatics
* Information architecture
* Information broker
* Information entropy
* Information geometry
* Information highway
* Information mapping
* Information overload
* Information processing
* Information processor
* Information sensitivity
* Information science
* Information system
* Information technology
* Information theory
* Infosphere
* Accuracy
* Abstraction
* Algorithmic information theory



* Classified information
* Complexity
o Complex system
o Complex adaptive system
* Cybernetics
* Exformation
* Fisher information
* Free Information Infrastructure
* Freedom of information
* Infornography
* Library and Information Science
* Medium



* Metadata
* Observation
* Philosophy of information
* Physical information
* Prediction
* Propaganda model
* Relevance
* Receiver operating characteristic
* Satisficing
* Shannon–Hartley theorem
o Claude Shannon
o Ralph Hartley
* Systems theory

[hide]
v • d • e
Major fields of technology
Applied science Artificial intelligence • Ceramic engineering • Computing technology • Electronics • Energy • Energy storage • Engineering physics • Environmental technology • Materials science & engineering • Microtechnology • Nanotechnology • Nuclear technology • Optical engineering
Information and communication Communication • Graphics • Music technology • Speech recognition • Visual technology
Industry Construction • Financial engineering • Manufacturing • Machinery • Mining
Military Bombs • Guns and Ammunition • Military technology and equipment • Naval engineering
Domestic Domestic appliances • Domestic technology • Educational technology • Food technology
Engineering Aerospace • Agricultural • Architectural • Bioengineering • Biochemical • Biomedical • Ceramic • Chemical • Civil • Computer • Construction • Electrical • Electronic • Environmental • Industrial • Materials • Mechanical • Mechatronics • Metallurgical • Mining • Naval • Nuclear • Petroleum • Software • Structural • Systems • Textile • Tissue
Health and safety Biomedical engineering • Bioinformatics • Biotechnology • Cheminformatics • Fire protection technology • Health technologies • Pharmaceuticals • Safety engineering • Sanitary engineering
Transport Aerospace • Aerospace engineering • Marine engineering • Motor vehicles • Space technology • Transport

[edit] External links

* Semantic Conceptions of Information Review by Luciano Floridi for the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy
* Principia Cybernetica entry on negentropy
* Fisher Information, a New Paradigm for Science: Introduction, Uncertainty principles, Wave equations, Ideas of Escher, Kant, Plato and Wheeler. This essay is continually revised in the light of ongoing research.
* Information, Consciousness & Health
* How Much Information? 2003 an attempt to estimate how much new information is created each year (study was produced by faculty and students at the School of Information Management and Systems at the University of California at Berkeley.)

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Information"

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The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions


Version 3.2 - August 2000


compiled and maintained by:
Jesse Miller


================================================== ======================

Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgements
Key To Recording Chronology Entries
General Recording Chronology
Attack: 1988-1992
Sustain: 1993-1996
Decay: 1997-2000
Television and Radio Performances
Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings
Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise
Online References


================================================== ======================

Introduction

The Smashing Pumpkins are arguably one of the greatest American rock
bands of the 1990s. They initially-- and to this day-- made music for
themselves, as opposed to the Goth and Industrial scenes in Chicago
during the late 1980s, or even the Pop and Hair Metal that dominated
the nationwide charts. Despite composing music completely unique and
genuine, The Smashing Pumpkins were labeled as a psychedelic/grunge
band and were brought into the limelight in 1992, along with the rush
of other acts that were paradoxically labeled as "Alternative" bands;
the aforementioned labels would be oversimplifying The Smashing
Pumpkins' output, spanning over a decade and roughly 400 songs.
As well as a tremendous live act, The Smashing Pumpkins also
recorded albums of quality far superior to that of their contemporaries.
I personally maintain that The Smashing Pumpkins are one of the only
remaining rock bands who use the recording studio to it's fullest,
joining the likes of Radiohead and The Flaming Lips to create records
that defy conventional rock and roll and cross the inconceivable barrier
into Art-Rock. Only a musical group of this magnitude would make their
third studio release a conceptual, double-album!
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions attempts to chronicle the
recordings of The Smashing Pumpkins, including: studio recording
sessions, home and studio demos, radio sessions, television
performances, and concert performances that have been officially
released. This document has been compiled from a number of sources, not
infrequently utilizing mere speculation; thus this document often
contains entries that are pure conjecture. Unless I am invited to
examine and document the band's mastertapes in the Virgin vaults
sometime in the near future, the conjecture will have to do! This
reveals the importance of the contributions by you, the dear reader; if
you have any information that could be useful in the SPRS, please e-mail
me-- of course you will be recognized for your bravery.
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions was originally compiled in
1996; it was finally uploaded onto the World Wide Web two years later,
in the January of 1998. The format of the SPRS was inspired the Nirvana
Recording Sessions and Song List, by John Loughney. The SPRS was last
updated in July, 2000. The latest version can be found at:

http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html


================================================== ======================

Acknowledgements

The following souls should be recognized for their contributions to the
Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions, whether they like it or not:

Eric Agnew, Dave Asselin, Simon Coyle, Karl Daher, Steve Hemming,
David Mead, Josh Provost, and all others in the online Smashing Pumpkins
community; if were not for their enlightening sites and gracious
information, the community would not be where it is now.

Mark Ignoffo, Neil Perry, and Ron Roesing for providing the
desperately needed, first-hand perspective on the recordings of The
Smashing Pumpkins. I cannot accurately describe how important their
information has been, and I am honored to have had the chance to hear
from them.

And to all the others who have provided the vital information that
kept this document alive for the past two years: Carmen Diane Dodge,
Matt Galek, Mike Harmon, Christopher Hill, Marquis, Moonkids, Clint,
John, Tim, Ville, and Zach.

One final shout-out to Mason Butler for providing the webspace and
html editing for this document, as well as putting up with my constant
barrage of Smashing Pumpkins-related rantings, ravings, and theories
over the past five years. Rawk on, Stereo Sonic!


================================================== ======================

Key To Chronology Entries

Date - Studio, Location (Producer/Engineer)
Released song
** Unreleased song
*C Unreleased song; available through commercial bootleg CDs
*T Unreleased song; available through tape trading
?* Unsure of exact information
NOTE: Additional information is sometimes provided.


Please refer to Dave Asselin's Smashing Pumpkins Text-Based Discography
for official release information.


================================================== ======================

General Recording Chronology

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
** Breathe
** It Suites Me Well [The Vigil]
** Heart / Cross
NOTE: An early demo called Nothing Ever Changes. The lineup
*******d: Billy, James, and Ron Roesing (formerly of The Marked) on
drums; this could be viewed as the very first recording that ceased
to be The Marked and became The Smashing Pumpkins. Heart and Cross
were originally two separate songs, but were joined together into
one. It Suits Me Well is actually The Vigil.
Although a tape exists as the aforementioned 3-song configuration,
The original Nothing Ever Changes was about 60 minutes in length and
was Billy's first attempt at a full-length album; it contained a
combination of songs, spoken word selections (recalled as "bad
poetry"), and instrumentals.

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
*T Break [My Dahlia]
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
?* Armed To The Teeth
?* Screaming
?* Sun
?* Holiday
?* I Fall
NOTE: About 12 songs were recorded by Billy and James, using a drum
machine. My Dahlia was at this time titled Break; Sun was called
Death of a Mind and featured an alternate chorus.

Late 1988 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Mark Ignoffo)
Sun
My Dahlia
*T East
NOTE: The first of many recordings with Mark Ignoffo, as the
sessions were described as an "on-going project." Sun and My Dahlia
were recorded and put on the Light Into Dark compilation. This
recording of Sun was later remixed by Quentin Sanbria and put on the
first demo tape.

Late 1988 - Schwa Productions, Chicago (Quentin Sanbria/Paul Chabala)
*C East
*C Jennifer Ever
*C Nothing and Everything
*C Spiteface
NOTE: Sessions for the first demo tape, aptly titled The Smashing
Pumpkins. Also *******d was a live version of She, and a remixed
version of Sun from the Ignoffo Sessions. The master tapes of this
session have apparently been lost, as they are no longer in the
band's possession.

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
Bye June
Daughter
Honeyspider
Honeyspider (alternate)
I Am One
Not Worth Asking
*C Bury Me
*C C'mon
*C Daydream
*C Egg
*C Love (old demo version)
*C Psychodelic
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rhinoceros (alternate)
*C Snap (If I Could)
*C Stars Fall In
*C With You
** Cinnamon Girl
NOTE: These sessions spawned both the second demo tape Moon, and
what is known as the Gish Basement Tape, a promotional cassette used
for bookings and label solicitation in 1989 and 1990. A few others
were officially released elsewhere: I Am One and Not Worth Asking
appeared on the Limited Potential 7"; Bye June was officially
released on the Lull EP and was also *******d on Moon; Daughter was
released on the Reflex Magazine flexi-disc and also *******d on
Moon. Two versions of Honeyspider were recorded: a distorted,
rocking version was released on the Tristessa 12" and a quieter,
clean-toned version was put on Moon, but remains officially
unreleased. Just as well, two unreleased versions of Rhinoceros
were recorded: an odd version with an organ solo played by Mark
Ignoffo was put on Moon, and a version closer to the Gish album
version was put on the Gish Basement Tape.
There is apparently a 21-song tape of this session, containing an
edit of Honeyspider (minus the feedback ending), and a version of
Daughter (with an additional minute and a half of feedback).

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
*T A Trip Unto Bountiful [Mother/Waiting]
*T Fat Man Blues
*T I Am One Part II
*T Vanilla
** Bleed
** Waiting For You Know
** Sun (abandoned)
** My Dahlia (abandoned)
** Stray Cat Blues
NOTE: This session was booked to record live-only favorites such as
Razor and I Am My End. Unfortunately Jimmy didn't show up and,
since the studio time was prepaid, it morphed into an acoustic
session. This was noted as a sloppy session with many false starts.
D'Arcy was present but did not perform.

1990 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Jesus Is The Sun
*T Translucent
NOTE: Unsure of exact recording information. May be demos recorded
at home or at rehearsal, rather than at a studio.

1990 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (Billy Corgan & Butch Vig)
La Dolly Vita
Tristessa (Sub-Pop version)
** La Dolly Vita

Summer 1990 - Smart Studio, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Jackie Blue

Dec 1990-Mar 1991 - Smart Studios, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Blue
Bury Me
Crush
Daydream
I Am One
I'm Going Crazy
Obscured
Rhinoceros
Siva
Slunk
Snail
Suffer
Tristessa
Why Am I So Tired
Window Paine
** Jesus Loves His Babies
** La Dolly Vita
NOTE: Gish was recorded to analog 16-track. To cut costs, each
instrument was recorded separately--drums, bass, then guitars, etc.
It is my guess that Why Am I So Tired is a Gish outtake/jam, based
on the stereophonic division and the general feel of the song. Jesus
Loves His Babies was a Gish outtake, and almost a B-side. A version
of Smiley may have been recorded during this session. Purr Snickety
might have been recorded at this time, rather than during the
Siamese sessions.

1991 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Luna
*T Wave Song
** STP
NOTE: Unreleased demos that all date from this period, although
exact recording information is unknown. "Wave Song" was written and
sung by James.

Spring 1992 - Waterfront Studios, New Jersey
** Drown
NOTE: The band's first of three attempts to record Drown. This one,
recorded at Lenny Kravitz's studio, was scrapped as the output
sounded more like a Kravitz recording!

March 1992 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (BC & Butch Vig)
Drown
** Drown (unfinished)
NOTE: The second attempt to record Drown proved useless, as Jimmy
began drinking as Billy & Butch set up and adjusted the sound; by
the time the band was ready to record, Jimmy was literally falling
of his stool drunk!

Spring 1992 - Billy's old apartment, Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Soothe
** Plume

Spring 1992 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan and Kerry Brown)
Bullet Train To Osaka
Hope
Plume
Starla
?* Moleasskiss

Fall 1992 - a Chicago studio [?]
** Quiet
** Kitty Kat [Hello Kitty Kat]
** Cherub Rock
** Suicide Kiss
** Today
** Disarm
** Rocket
** Spaceboy
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** Soma
** Whirl
** Doorstep [Meladori Magpie]
** Pissant
** Tulips
** Hummer
** French Movie Theme
NOTE: This is a tape of Siamese Dream demos submitted to Virgin
Records in 1992, called "Quiet and Other Songs: A Collection of
Songs for Album II." Doorstep is an early version of Meladori
Magpie and featured a full-band arrangement. Suicide Kiss was said
to have evolved into a number of different songs, including Geek
USA. Hello Kitty Kat was at this time simply titled Kitty Kat.

Dec 1992-Mar 1993 - Triclops Sound Studios, Georgia (BC & Butch Vig)
Apathy's Last Kiss
Cherub Rock
Disarm
Frail and Bedazzled
French Movie Theme
Geek USA
Hello Kitty Kat
Hummer
Infinite Sadness
Luna
Mayonaise
Mayonaise (acoustic click track)
Pissant
Pulseczar
Purr Snickety
Quiet
Rocket
Siamese Dream
Silverfuck
Sinfony
Soma
Spaceboy
Spaced
Sweet Sweet
Today
Whir
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings (unfinished version)
** Disarm (electric version)
** Doorstep
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** She Says
** Suicide Kiss
** Tulips
?* Spaceboy (alternate)
NOTE: Despite it's layers of guitar, Siamese dream was recorded more
in a live-band fashion than Gish was. I am guessing Pulseczar and
Sinfony are Siamese outtakes, although they could have been recorded
anytime. Purr Snickety might be a Gish outtake because it was
performed live on 7/21/91, although released as a Siamese B-side and
also registered with BMI during the Siamese Dream period. Contrary
to general belief, Infinite Sadness was recorded during the Siamese
sessions and at that time it was called Mellon Collie! An alternate
acoustic version of Mayonaise (erroneously dubbed a demo) was
*******d on the 1991-1998 promo; this is actually an alternate mix
of the released studio version, featuring the slightly phased
acoustic click track (which can be heard on the album version
notably at 3:35) and a tambourine. An alternate mix of Hello Kitty
Kat was *******d on the promo cassette of Siamese Dream, but was
subsequently stricken from the sequencing of the album when that mix
was lost.

Spring 1993 - Soundworks/Smart Studios (BC with B. Vig & Kerry Brown)
Blew Away
Glynis

Summer 1994 - Gravity Studios, Chicago
*T Jellybelly
*T Beautiful One [Ugly]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T No Escape [Weeping Willowly]
*T To Forgive Nothing Less
*T Blast
*T Descendo [Mouths of Babes]
*T And I Stumbled [Pennies]
*T Dizzle
*T A/Ab/E/B/F#
*T Rings
*T James Complex Song [So So Pretty]
*T With Longing
*T Straight Ab [Love]
*T Set the Ray to Jerry
*T The Innocents [Galapogos]
*T A Done [Speed]
*T Busy Downtune Bb/G [Lucky Lad]
*T Jackboot
*T New Wave A to G
*T A/B/G Drop A
*T Glamey Glamey [Marquis In Spades]
*T Walking Country
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T The Groover
*T New Wave Echo
*T Pretty Drop A [Millieu]
*T E Drone E/C#/A
*T Disconnected
NOTE: The band booked time at Gravity Studios mid-way through the
Siamese Dream Tour to record demos for their upcoming double album.
All tracks were instrumentals (with the exception of Bullet with
Butterfly Wings, which *******d a half-hearted scratch vocal), and
thus the recordings seem more of a jam-session. This session was
the source for a number of the Pastichio Medley tracks, as the songs
appear here as they do on the Medley. Most of the tracks also
feature extremely early working titles, some titled simply as their
chord progression. The song New Wave Echo is actually the song
known to bootleggers as Germans in Leather Pants (Shame On You) and,
despite much debate, is an original Pumpkins tune.

sometime in 1993 or 1994 - a studio [?]
?* Moonage Daydream
NOTE: A David Bowie cover recorded for a tribute album that was
ultimately scrapped. There is little to no information available on
this recording.

Fall 1994 - Bugg Studios (James's house), Chicago
Bugg Superstar
NOTE: It is my guess that James recorded Bugg Superstar solo at his
home for Vieuphoria/Earphoria. It is also my guess that there is
more incidental music for Vieuphoria that was unused.

Fall 1994 - Sadlands (Billy's house), Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Blank
Jupiter's Lament
Meladori Magpie
Rotten Apples
Stumbleine
*C Autumn Nocturne
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Galapogos
*C Frantic Ab Groove [Groove]
*C Here is not why [Here is no why]
*C Lily (my one and only)
*C Glamey Glamey [Marquis in Spades]
*C Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*C Ropey Lopey [Beautiful]
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Ugly/Beautiful [Ugly]
*C Wishing You Were
** Feelium
** God
NOTE: This session is what is known as the Mellon Collie Demo Tape.
Oddly enough, all tracks on this tape (except Mellon Collie and
Marquis in Spades) were pretty much registered with BMI in the
running order of the tape (with a few exceptions). This makes the
naming of the unknown songs much easier. The unknown instrumental
seems to be called Groove. The song incorrectly called Strolling
(Running with the leaves/Do as you please) is actually Autumn
Nocturne, and definitely NOT a 1979 demo. The final instrumental,
Ropey Lopey, was eventually incorporated into the interlude of
Beautiful. At this point in time, Here Is No Why was called Here Is
Not Why and Ugly was called Ugly/Beautiful. Marquis in Spades was
at this time called Glamey Glamey (as it was during the Gravity
Sessions), but it has been mis-published as Shamay. Electric demos
for Feelium and God exist, but are not in circulation.


Jan 1995 - a Chicago studio [?]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Set the Ray To Jerry
*T So Very Sad About Us
*T Jellybelly
*T Mouths of Babes
*T Here is no why
*T God
*T Love
*T For Martha (chorus section)
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T Methusela
*T Depresso
*T Zero (alt ver 1)
*T Zero (alt ver 2)
*T Here is no why (lyrics)
*T Cherry
*T Beautiful
*T (unknown)
NOTE: A rehearsal tape, possibly recorded at Pumpkinland or another
Chicago studio, dubbed the Mellon Collie Electric Demos. This tape
was apparently given to D'Acry to learn the then-new songs. Most
tracks are instrumentals, with the exception of Methusela, Here is
no why, and Beautiful that contain a double-tracked vocal.

Mar 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
NOTE: Before entering a studio to record Mellon Collie, Flood and
the Pumpkins went into Pumpkinland, their Chicago rehearsal space,
to run through all of the new material. This is probably the source
for many of the "Pasticio Medley" songs. Assuming that countless
hours of rehearsal was recorded, (including Mellon Collie tracks,
Mellon Collie B-sides, "Pasticio Medley" songs, unreleased songs,
and miscellaneous jamming) it is impossible to know, let alone list
what was recorded. MTV filmed a few days of rehearsal to be
*******d in the MTV Rockumentary on The Smashing Pumpkins. Evidence
suggests that video exists of "God" and "Rubberman." A bootleg
video, known as the '666 Video,' has surfaced which apparently is
the film shot by one camera over two days of rehearsal:

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T The Boy
*T Where Boys Fear To Tread
*T The Viper
*T Tribute To Johnny
*T Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
*T Rachel [early XYU instumental]

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T Thru the Eyes of Ruby
*T V-8
*T Rachel [early XYU with lyrics]
*T The Black Rider
*T The Tracer
*T Cupid de Locke
*T Zero

Mar-Aug 1995 - Chicago Recording Company (Flood, Alan Moulder, and BC)
Beautiful
Bodies
Bullet with Butterfly Wings
By Starlight
Cherry
Cupid de Locke
Farewell and Goodnight
Fuck You (an ode to no one)
Galapogos
God
Here is no why
In the Arms of Sleep
Jellybelly
Lily (my one and only)
Love
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
Muzzle
Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
Set the Ray to Jerry
Take Me Down
Tales of a Scorched Earth
Thirty-Three
Thru the Eyes of Ruby
To Forgive
Tonight, Tonight
Tonite Reprise
Tribute to Johnny
Ugly
We Only Come Out At Night
Where Boys Fear To Tread
XYU
Zero
1979
** A Dog's Prayer
** Feelium
** Jupiter's Lament (with whole band singing)
** Mellon Collie Reprise
** Methusela
** Mouths of Babes
** Phang
** Rock Me
** Spazmatazz
** Speed
** Speed Racer
** Ugly (3 alternate versions)
?* Keep It
NOTE: I am assuming that most of the Mellon Collie tracks were
recorded at CRC, although it is just as possible that some tracks
could have been culled from the Pumpkinland session. Keep It is
rumored to be an unreleased song, or at least evolved into another
song.

March-August 1995 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
Believe
Said Sadly
The Boy

May 31, 1995 - Chicago Recording Company; Sequence Four
*T Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*T Tonight Tonight
*T Jellybelly
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Fuck You
*T Muzzle
** Zero
** Here is no why
** To Forgive
** Love
** Cupid de Locke
** Galapogos
** Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
** Take Me Down
** Lily (my one and only)
NOTE: On this date, a rough mix of the Mellon Collie album was
created, dubbed Sequence Four. In other words, this tape was
basically what Mellon Collie sounded like as of May 31st. All songs
were rough takes and featured scratch vocals, if any; Galapogos even
featured a solo that was omitted from the final version.

August 1995 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood, Alan Moulder, & BC)
[all 28 Mellon Collie tracks mixed with overdubs]

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Marquis in Spades
Medellia of the Grey Skies (with The Frogs)
Mouths of Babes
Pennies
Sad Peter Pan (with Red Red Meat)
NOTE: I doubt that all these songs were recorded together at one
session, but is grouped together because they are all post-Mellon
Collie songs.

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
NOTE: At this time, Billy complied the sound collage known as
Pasticio Medley. The track consists of 10-second snippets of about
70 unreleased "songs," with a total running time of 23 minutes.
While many of the songs were most likely instrumental jams, it is
equally as possible that a number of the songs were actual
compositions with lyrics and a song structure--a few of the tracks
had already been registered through BMI half a year earlier! The
snippets were compiled from a variety of sources recorded after
Siamese Dream and the completion of Mellon Collie. Pasticio Medley
features, in order of appearance:
The Demon, Thunderbolt, Dearth, Knuckles, Star Song, Fire Power,
New Waver, Space Jam, Zoom, So Very Sad About Us, Phang, Speed
Racer, The Eternal E, Hairy Eyeball, The Groover, Hell Bent For
Hell, Rachel, A Dog's Prayer, Blast, The Black Rider, Slurpee,
Flipper, The Viper, Bitch, Fried, Harmonio, USA, The Tracer,
Envelope Woman, Plastic Guy, Glasgow 3AM, The Road Is Long,
Funkified, Rigamorole, Depresso, The Streets Are Hot Tonight,
Dawn at 16, Spazmatazz, Fucker, In the Arms of Sheep, Speed, 77,
Me Rock You Snow, Feelium, Is Alex Milton, Ruberman, Spacer,
Rock Me, Weeping Willowly, Rings, So So Pretty, Lucky Lad, Jackboot,
Millieu, Disconnected, Let Your Lazer Love Light Shine Down, Phreak,
Porkbelly, Robot Lover, Jimmy James, America, Slinkeepie, Dummy Tum
Tummy, Fakir, Jake, Camaro, Moonkids, Make It Fungus, V-8, and Die.

Mar 1996 - Charing Cross Studios, Australia (BC/Martin White)
The Aeroplane Flies High
The Last Song
Transformer
NOTE: These tracks were recorded in Australia, while on tour.
Further overdubs were recorded later in Chicago. They were mixed,
along with Eye, at Chung King Studios by Neil Perry.

June 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Clones
Destination Unknown
Dreaming
My Blue Heaven
You're All I've Got Tonight
June 1996 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
A Night Like This
The Bells
June 1996 - Farmer Brown's Studio (D'Arcy's house) (Kerry Brown)
Dreaming (vocal tracks)
NOTE: This session is very conjectural; The time frame is an
estimate and I doubt that all of these songs were recorded
together.

July 1996 - Chicago studio [?]
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** To Sheila
?* [about 7 more songs]
NOTE: First session for Adore, held shortly after Jimmy's release.
The Pumpkins functioned as a trio during this session. With about
10 songs hastily recorded in a week, the session was scrapped as
the finished product seemed more like demos.

Summer 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Eye
** Tear
NOTE: Billy actually recorded two songs for the Lost Highway
Soundtrack. The second was an early version of Tear, which was
rejected.

September 1996 - Chung King, NY (Chris Shepard/Neil Perry & BC)
Lizards
Rats
Spiders
Squirrels with Tails
Worms
Worms (part 2)
NOTE: Recorded in about a week, this was just Billy Corgan and Matt
Walker recording riffs for the Ransom Soundtrack. Billy's scant
vocals were recorded on a mini tape dictaphone recorder.
These songs were curiously copyrighted as Parallel Stories.

December 1996 - The New Hit Factory, NY (Arif Mardin/Michael O'Riley)
Christmastime

Feb 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Billy Corgan/Chris Shepard)
Annie-Dog
Once In A While
The Ether's Tragic
The Guns of Love Disastrous
** Blissed and Gone
** Chewing Gum
** Do You Close Your Eyes
** For Martha (instrumental)
** My Mistake
** The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
** The End is The Beginning is the End
** The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
?* [about 20 other Adore demos]
?* [about 8 or 10 other Batman demos]
NOTE: The Pumpkins (with Matt Walker) supposedly recorded about 45
minutes worth of demos for the Batman soundtrack, so Guns of Love
and Ethers Tragic are probably from that tape. Roughly 30 demos for
the album Adore were also recorded at this time, so I'm sure both
the Adore and Batman demos where recorded at this session; the album
version of Annie-Dog was drawn from these sessions.

March 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Nellee Hooper/Chris Shepard)
The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
The End is the Beginning is the End
NOTE: Recorded in Studio 5, which was demolished a few months later.

August-September 1997 - Streeterville Studios, Chicago
NOTE: This session was confirmed, but it is unknown what was
recorded and by whom. This could be part of the Wood sessions,
or somehow related to it. Does anyone have any more info?

Fall 1997 - Chicago Trax Recording and Hinge Chicago (Brad Wood)
Ava Adore
Behold! The Night Mare
Blank Page
Daphne Descends
Tear
To Sheila
NOTE: This session for Adore was originally scrapped, but was
latter used as the basic tracks for the album with overdubs and
such recorded later in California.

Nov-Mar 1998 - Sunset Sound, California (Billy Corgan/Neil Perry)
Appels + Oranjes
Blissed and Gone
Crestfallen
Czarina
For Martha
Once In A While
Once Upon A Time
Perfect
Pug
Shame
Summer
The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
Waiting
17
** Cash Car Star
** Saturnine
?* [7 or 8 more songs]
NOTE: Although Adore was mostly recorded at Studio 2 at Sunset
Sound, many tracks were pieced together from other sessions at:
Battery Studios, Bugg Studios, Chicago Recording Company, Sadlands,
and Village Recorder. Waiting and Saturnine were merely unfinished
song fragments. There are conflicting reports to as how much
material was recorded; it has been suggested that there are
approximately 14 or 15 more finished songs from the Adore sessions,
but Neil Perry says that 40-odd songs or song fragments were
recorded.

March 1998 - Sound City, California (Rick Rubin/Sylvia Massey)
** Let Me Give The World To You
NOTE: The last song recorded for Adore, it was taken off the album
at the last second and remains unreleased. The finished version was
apparently a stripped down arrangement, which *******d: guitar,
bass, organ, and drums by Joey Waronker.

Late 1998 - Sadlands, Chicago
** If There Is A God
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 1)
** Wound (3/4 time)
** Le Deux Machina (keyboard version)
** Vanity
** Glass and the Ghost Children
** Autumn (instrumental)
** Drain
** Laugh
** Here I Am
** Lover
** Let Me Give The World To You
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 2)
** Speed Kills
NOTE: Acoustic demos for the Machina album, recorded at Billy's
home. The tape *******s two lyrically different versions of Blue
Skies Bring Tears, one containing the lyrics from the arrangement of
the song performed during The Arising! Tour in April 1999. Lover is
the song bootlegged as Don't Wanna Be Your Lover or One Less Moment.

Nov 1998-Sept 1999 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Blue Skies Bring Tears
Glass and the Ghost Children
Heavy Metal Machine
I of the Mourning
Raindrops + Sunshowers
Speed Kills
Stand Inside Your Love
The Everlasting Gaze
The Imploding Voice
The Crying Tree of Mercury
The Sacred and Profane
This Time
Try, Try, Try
With Every Light
Wound
*T Dross
*T Glass Theme
*T Here's To The Atom Bomb
*T If There Is A God
*T Real Love
** Cash Car Star
** Go
** Home
** Let Me Give The World To You
?* Bringing The Weather
?* Death Boogie
?* In My Body
?* Jam 13
?* Saturnine
NOTE: Machina was haphazardly recorded at Pumpkinland over a span of
ten months. Many alternate versions exist of the songs, as the band
consistently toyed with their arrangement. The songs on the final
album often consisted of combinations of a few different
arrangements of each song. In other words, the Machina tracks
continually evolved throughout the year, and the tape was rolling
during their transformation.
Radio was an early incarnation of I of the Mourning, just as Slow
Songs was of Crying Tree of Mercury and Disco King was of The
Everlasting Gaze. The second movement of Glass and the Ghost
Children is actually a bit of the six-minute Le Deux Machina (which
multiple versions exist of). Go is apparently a James song that was
left off the album.
A tape called "Friends and Enemies of Modern Music" has surfaced,
most likely compiled early on during the sessions. The tape
*******d early mixes and recordings of several Machina tracks (most
with live-band arrangements) as well as soundboard recordings of
Money (That's What I Want) and XYU from the 10/31/98 show. The tape
also *******d an alternate Heavy Metal Machine with both different
lyrics and a different main riff, and an arrangement of Blue Skies
Bring Tears much like The Arising! version.

Oct 1999 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Age of Innocence
NOTE: Recorded at that last second, and tagged onto the album,
possibly as sort of an afterthought. D'Arcy most likely did not
play bass on the song.

July 2000 - Chicago Recording Company
*? Lucky 13
*? White Spiders
NOTE: Sessions for the final Smashing Pumpkins album. The band is
said to be working on unfinished tracks from the Machina Sessions.


================================================== ======================

Television and Radio Performances

The Smashing Pumpkins, like many other bands, have performed nation and
worldwide on various media formats. The following is a chronology of
the band's television and radio performances, along with any concert
performances that have been officially released.


Nov 16, 1988 - WNUR Radio, Evanston, Illinois
** My Eternity
** Venus In Furs
NOTE: It was noted that Jimmy had recently joined the band. It has
been unconfirmed if more tracks were performed or not.

Mar 16, 1989 - WZRD Radio, Chicago, Illinois
*T Cinnamon Girl
*T East
*T My Eternity
*T Nothing and Everything
*T Rhinoceros
*T Snap (If I Could)
*T Spiteface
*T Sun
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
*T Venus In Furs
NOTE: A live performance upon the release of the Light Into Dark
compilation. This was possibly one of the first performances of
Rhinoceros.

June 23, 1991 - Rose Records, Chicago (Mike Rubano)
Terrapin
*T Blue
*T Bury Me
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Smiley
*T Suffer

Sept 8, 1991 - Maida Vaile Studios, London (Dale Griffin)
Girl Named Sandoz
Siva
Smiley
NOTE: The slightly infamous John Peel Sessions.

Jan 15, 1992 - VPRO Radio session, Hilversum, Holland
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Silverfuck
*T Snail

1992 - Nippon Television, Japan
Slunk (live Vieuphoria version)

September 1992 - BBC Late Show, London
*C Rhinoceros

June 22, 1993 - MTV Most Wanted, London; live acoustic performance
Cherub Rock (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
** Disarm

June 23, 1993 - Studio 10S, Paris, France; live acoustic performance
*C Cherub Rock
*C Dancing in the Moonlight
*C Disarm
*T Drown
*T Hummer
*T Kooks
*T Luna
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rocket
*C Siva
*C Spaceboy
*C Suffer
*C Today

June 30, 1993 - VPRO Radio for Villa '65, Netherlands (Hans Bunt)
Dancing in the Moonlight
Spaceboy (live NME version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Rocket
*T Today

July 26, 1993 - Tower Records, Chicago; live acoustic performance
Rocket (acoustic ONXRT version)
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Mayonaise
*T Siva
*C Today

July 30, 1993 - Naked City, UK TV; live acoustic performance
Mayonaise (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Exact recording date unknown, although it was originally
broadcasted on July 30, 1993.

September 3, 1993 - Alabamhalle, Germany; live performance
Geek USA (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Telepool Productions. Although recorded on
September 3, 1993, it was originally broadcasted on Feb. 21, 1994.
Also performed: Cherub Rock, Disarm, Rocket, Quiet, Today, Drown,
Hummer, Soma, Siva, Silverfuck.

September 1993 - The Word, BBC Studios, London; live performance
Disarm (live Vieuphoria version)
*C Sunshine of Your Love
NOTE: Recorded by Planet 24, Channel 4 London. Although recorded in
September of 1993, it was broadcasted on February 18, 1994.

September 1993 - Sala Apollo, Barcelona; live performance
I Am One (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Sputnik de Televisio de Catalunya. Originally
broadcasted on March 4, 1994. Also performed: Rocket, Quiet, Today,
Disarm, Soma, Cherub Rock, and Silverfuck.

September 12, 1993 - BBC Radio One Studios, London (Ted de Bono)
Landslide
Never Let Me Down
** Disarm

October 1993 - MTV No Alternative session; live performance
Glynis (live No Alternative version)
Today (live No Alternative version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Geek USA
*T I Am One

October 28, 1993 - NBC Studio 8-H, New York; SNL rehearsals
*C Cherub Rock (2 takes)
*C Today (2 takes)

October 30, 1993 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Cherub Rock
*C Today

November 10, 1993 - Atlanta, Georgia; live performance
Quiet (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Modi for Modivational Films and produced by
Merril Ward. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

December 10, 1993 - Aragon Ballroom, Chicago; live performance
Today (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Jam Productions. Live audio remix by Butch Vig
at Smart Studios. Also performed: Geek USA, Quiet, Disarm, Siva,
Drown, Hummer, Cherub Rock, Rocket, Soma, I Am One, Spaceboy, Bury
Me, and Silverfuck.

December 12, 1993 - Universal, Los Angeles; live acoustic performance
Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Rocket
*C Spaceboy
*C Today

February 24, 1994 - Astoria Theatre, London; live performance
Silverfuck (live Vieuphoria version)
Soma (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Bret Turnbull and produced by Sarah Bayliss for
Medialab. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

September 8, 1994 - MTV Music Awards, New York; live performance
*T Disarm

October 23, 1995 - Riviera Theatre, Chicago; live performance
Bullet with Butterfly Wings (live Launch CD ROM version)
Disarm (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Today (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Tonight, Tonight (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Zero (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
NOTE: A live show recorded and broadcasted live on FM radio. 5
tracks were systematically released on promo and multimedia discs.
Also performed: Jellybelly, Fuck You, Thru the Eyes of Ruby, Geek
USA, Porcelina of the Vast Oceans, Cherub Rock, Mayonaise, XYU,
Baby Loves to Rock, If You Want My Love and Auf Weidersehen.

Nov 11, 1995 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Zero

December 1995 - The White Room, Westwood Studios, UK TV; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

December 10, 1995 - Canal+, French TV, France; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

January 29, 1996 - American Music Awards, Shrine Auditorium, LA; live
*C 1979

March 13, 1996 - Triple J Studios, Sydney, Australia; live acoustic
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Cupid de Locke
*C Muzzle
*C Take Me Down
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Tonight, Tonight
*C 1979

Sept 4, 1996 - MTV Music Video Awards, Radio City Music Hall, NY; live
*C Tonight, Tonight

November 14, 1996 - MTV Europe Music Video Awards; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

February 25, 1997 - NBC Studios, NY; live performance
*C Muzzle

Feb 26, 1997 - Academy Awards, Madison Square Garden, NY; live
1979 (live Grammy Nominees version)

May 12, 1998 - Late with Jools Holland, BBC Studios, London; live
*T Ava Adore
*T Daphne Descends
*T Once Upon A Time

May 20, 1998 - RTVE Studios, Madrid, Spain
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Tear
** To Sheila

July 9, 1998 - Q101 Studios, Chicago
** Perfect

July 19, 1998 - Much Music Studios, Toronto, Canada
** Ava Adore
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings
** For Martha
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Pug
** Shame
** To Sheila
** Transmission
** 1979

July 30, 1998 - Late Show with David Letterman, 53rd Street, New York
** Ava Adore
** Crestfallen
** Perfect
** Pug
** To Sheila
** 1979

August 3, 1998 - Howard Stern Show, New York
** Perfect

August 4, 1998 - Live with Regis and Kathy Lee, New York
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect

May-Sept 1998 - Adore Tour, various locations around the globe
NOTE: Almost all of the dates on the Adore Tour were professionally
taped by the band and sometimes by the local media. The film was to
be used for a full-length documentary on the Adore Tour, directed by
Jesse Ignjatovic. This film was never finished and will most likely
never be released, due to conflicts in the editing process.

September 26, 1998 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studios, New York; live
** Perfect

October 25, 1998 - VH1 Fashion Awards, New York; live performance
** Crestfallen

Jan 17, 2000 - Canal+, Nulle Part Ailleurs, France
** The Everlasting Gaze

Jan 30, 2000 - ABC Studios, Los Angles, Politically Incorrect
** The Everlasting Gaze
** Stand Inside Your Love

Mar 9, 2000 - MTV Studios, Total Request Live, New York
** The Everlasting Gaze
** I of the Mourning
** XYU (jam)

April 26, 2000 - Ed Sullivan Theatre, NY, Late Night w/ Dave Letterman
** I of the Mourning


================================================== ======================

Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings

Appendix A consists of a list of unreleased song titles that have been
performed live. Some title have already been noted in the General
Recording Chronology; thus, the song was performed live but the studio
version was not released. The remaining titles were performed live and
were either not officially recorded in a studio or otherwise, or the
recording information is unavailable.
The entries ******* a selected date and location the song was
performed. The provided date may not necessarily be the only
performance date, but is only the most available, of best soundquality,
or most definitive in the context of bootlegs and concert tapes.
Appendix A only *******s Smashing Pumpkins originals, or songs only
written by Billy Corgan, James Iha, or Billy Corgan and James Iha (as
many of the earlier songs were). Covers and improvisational jams are
not *******d.


The Vigil Chicago 8/10/88
Armed To The Teeth " "
I Fall " "
6234 " "
Holiday " "
Screaming " "
There It Goes Chicago 10/5/88
My Eternity " "
Under Your Spell " "
She " "
Bleed " "
Oiu Henri Chicago 11/23/88
Alabaster Chicago 4/30/89
Salt Chicago 10/31/89
Lie I Lie ??/??/89
365 ??/??/90
I'll Never Change ??/??/90
Morning Jam ??/??/90
Opal Worship ??/??/90
Razor Madison 6/16/90
Try To Try Madison 6/16/90
Over You Cincinnati 9/13/90
Jesus Loves His Babies Chicago 6/22/91
I Am My End Seattle 8/20/91
What You Wanted Seattle 8/20/91
Offer Up Paris 2/5/92
Chump ??/??/92
Towers of Rabble Chicago 2/21/95
Speed Chicago 2/21/95
Space Jam Vancouver 1/8/97
Let Me Give The World To You Hamburg 5/14/98
Cash Car Star Los Angeles 10/31/98
Lover Los Angeles 12/12/98
If There Is A God Los Angeles 12/12/98
Dross Detroit 4/10/99
Glass Theme " "
Home " "
Pale Scales (instrumental) Chicago 12/20/99


================================================== ======================

Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise

Appendix B consists of selected commentary concerning a few of the more
"puzzling" aspects of The Smashing Pumpkins music. As with any band
with a breathtaking amount of output, there is sure to be a number of
debates and controversies over unknown song titles, the identity of
various demos, etc.
If you have any contributions to Appendix B, don't be afraid to send
them to me. They will be *******d and your credit will be given.


- IS STP REALLY SET THE RAY TO JERRY?

I have heard rumors that STP is an early version of Set The Ray To
Jerry. I find this hard to believe, as I'm sure someone incorrectly
thought STP was the abbreviation for Set The Ray For Jerry (wouldn't
it be STRTJ or SRJ?). Does anyone have any other substantial info?


- OFFER UP (LONG) IS ACTUALLY JELLYBELLY

The title for the song formerly and incorrectly known as Offer Up
(Long) has been discovered! The song is actually an extremely early
version of Jellybelly (which was what the song was called in '92),
that often had lyrics from Offer Up tagged at the end of it.
For those who are wondering, the old Jellybelly's riff's were
inverted and the song evolved twice over the coursed of the three
years, until it's eventual release on Mellon Collie.


- ZOOM IS REALLY SPACE JAM

Dave Mead convinced me that the song we all know and love as Zoom is
not called Zoom at all, but Space Jam. It seems that an error was
made when calculating the time on the Pasticio Medley. He also says
the title Space Jam was confirmed by a source close to the band.


================================================== ======================

Online References

Eric Agnew, Smashing Pumpkins Fan Collaborative
Steve Hemming, Smashing Pumpkins Collection
David Mead, Faded Photographs
Josh Provost, Smashing Pumpkins Live Recording Association

Reel Time Studios - http://www.reeltimestudios.com
BMI Music Publishing - http://www.bmi.com

Dave Asselin, Smashing Pumpkins Text Based Discography
Karl Daher, Smashing Pumpkins Compact Disc Bootlist
Mike Hamilton and Vince Horst, Smashing Pumpkins FAQ
Jesse Miller, The Mashed Potatoes FAQ


================================================== ======================

Jesse Miller

The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions
http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html

Now featured at SPFC.org!!!
http://www.spfc.org/band/studio.html

Mirrored at:
http://www.netphoria.org/recording/recording.html
http://wound.hypermart.com/sprecordings.txt
http://www.smashing-pumpkins.net/recording/index.html
http://blamo.org/sp/sessions.txt


EOF

 
Luke de Spa is offline
Old 06-10-2007, 12:55 PM   #35
Luke de Spa
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke de Spa
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions


Version 3.2 - August 2000


compiled and maintained by:
Jesse Miller


================================================== ======================

Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgements
Key To Recording Chronology Entries
General Recording Chronology
Attack: 1988-1992
Sustain: 1993-1996
Decay: 1997-2000
Television and Radio Performances
Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings
Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise
Online References


================================================== ======================

Introduction

The Smashing Pumpkins are arguably one of the greatest American rock
bands of the 1990s. They initially-- and to this day-- made music for
themselves, as opposed to the Goth and Industrial scenes in Chicago
during the late 1980s, or even the Pop and Hair Metal that dominated
the nationwide charts. Despite composing music completely unique and
genuine, The Smashing Pumpkins were labeled as a psychedelic/grunge
band and were brought into the limelight in 1992, along with the rush
of other acts that were paradoxically labeled as "Alternative" bands;
the aforementioned labels would be oversimplifying The Smashing
Pumpkins' output, spanning over a decade and roughly 400 songs.
As well as a tremendous live act, The Smashing Pumpkins also
recorded albums of quality far superior to that of their contemporaries.
I personally maintain that The Smashing Pumpkins are one of the only
remaining rock bands who use the recording studio to it's fullest,
joining the likes of Radiohead and The Flaming Lips to create records
that defy conventional rock and roll and cross the inconceivable barrier
into Art-Rock. Only a musical group of this magnitude would make their
third studio release a conceptual, double-album!
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions attempts to chronicle the
recordings of The Smashing Pumpkins, including: studio recording
sessions, home and studio demos, radio sessions, television
performances, and concert performances that have been officially
released. This document has been compiled from a number of sources, not
infrequently utilizing mere speculation; thus this document often
contains entries that are pure conjecture. Unless I am invited to
examine and document the band's mastertapes in the Virgin vaults
sometime in the near future, the conjecture will have to do! This
reveals the importance of the contributions by you, the dear reader; if
you have any information that could be useful in the SPRS, please e-mail
me-- of course you will be recognized for your bravery.
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions was originally compiled in
1996; it was finally uploaded onto the World Wide Web two years later,
in the January of 1998. The format of the SPRS was inspired the Nirvana
Recording Sessions and Song List, by John Loughney. The SPRS was last
updated in July, 2000. The latest version can be found at:

http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html


================================================== ======================

Acknowledgements

The following souls should be recognized for their contributions to the
Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions, whether they like it or not:

Eric Agnew, Dave Asselin, Simon Coyle, Karl Daher, Steve Hemming,
David Mead, Josh Provost, and all others in the online Smashing Pumpkins
community; if were not for their enlightening sites and gracious
information, the community would not be where it is now.

Mark Ignoffo, Neil Perry, and Ron Roesing for providing the
desperately needed, first-hand perspective on the recordings of The
Smashing Pumpkins. I cannot accurately describe how important their
information has been, and I am honored to have had the chance to hear
from them.

And to all the others who have provided the vital information that
kept this document alive for the past two years: Carmen Diane Dodge,
Matt Galek, Mike Harmon, Christopher Hill, Marquis, Moonkids, Clint,
John, Tim, Ville, and Zach.

One final shout-out to Mason Butler for providing the webspace and
html editing for this document, as well as putting up with my constant
barrage of Smashing Pumpkins-related rantings, ravings, and theories
over the past five years. Rawk on, Stereo Sonic!


================================================== ======================

Key To Chronology Entries

Date - Studio, Location (Producer/Engineer)
Released song
** Unreleased song
*C Unreleased song; available through commercial bootleg CDs
*T Unreleased song; available through tape trading
?* Unsure of exact information
NOTE: Additional information is sometimes provided.


Please refer to Dave Asselin's Smashing Pumpkins Text-Based Discography
for official release information.


================================================== ======================

General Recording Chronology

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
** Breathe
** It Suites Me Well [The Vigil]
** Heart / Cross
NOTE: An early demo called Nothing Ever Changes. The lineup
*******d: Billy, James, and Ron Roesing (formerly of The Marked) on
drums; this could be viewed as the very first recording that ceased
to be The Marked and became The Smashing Pumpkins. Heart and Cross
were originally two separate songs, but were joined together into
one. It Suits Me Well is actually The Vigil.
Although a tape exists as the aforementioned 3-song configuration,
The original Nothing Ever Changes was about 60 minutes in length and
was Billy's first attempt at a full-length album; it contained a
combination of songs, spoken word selections (recalled as "bad
poetry"), and instrumentals.

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
*T Break [My Dahlia]
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
?* Armed To The Teeth
?* Screaming
?* Sun
?* Holiday
?* I Fall
NOTE: About 12 songs were recorded by Billy and James, using a drum
machine. My Dahlia was at this time titled Break; Sun was called
Death of a Mind and featured an alternate chorus.

Late 1988 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Mark Ignoffo)
Sun
My Dahlia
*T East
NOTE: The first of many recordings with Mark Ignoffo, as the
sessions were described as an "on-going project." Sun and My Dahlia
were recorded and put on the Light Into Dark compilation. This
recording of Sun was later remixed by Quentin Sanbria and put on the
first demo tape.

Late 1988 - Schwa Productions, Chicago (Quentin Sanbria/Paul Chabala)
*C East
*C Jennifer Ever
*C Nothing and Everything
*C Spiteface
NOTE: Sessions for the first demo tape, aptly titled The Smashing
Pumpkins. Also *******d was a live version of She, and a remixed
version of Sun from the Ignoffo Sessions. The master tapes of this
session have apparently been lost, as they are no longer in the
band's possession.

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
Bye June
Daughter
Honeyspider
Honeyspider (alternate)
I Am One
Not Worth Asking
*C Bury Me
*C C'mon
*C Daydream
*C Egg
*C Love (old demo version)
*C Psychodelic
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rhinoceros (alternate)
*C Snap (If I Could)
*C Stars Fall In
*C With You
** Cinnamon Girl
NOTE: These sessions spawned both the second demo tape Moon, and
what is known as the Gish Basement Tape, a promotional cassette used
for bookings and label solicitation in 1989 and 1990. A few others
were officially released elsewhere: I Am One and Not Worth Asking
appeared on the Limited Potential 7"; Bye June was officially
released on the Lull EP and was also *******d on Moon; Daughter was
released on the Reflex Magazine flexi-disc and also *******d on
Moon. Two versions of Honeyspider were recorded: a distorted,
rocking version was released on the Tristessa 12" and a quieter,
clean-toned version was put on Moon, but remains officially
unreleased. Just as well, two unreleased versions of Rhinoceros
were recorded: an odd version with an organ solo played by Mark
Ignoffo was put on Moon, and a version closer to the Gish album
version was put on the Gish Basement Tape.
There is apparently a 21-song tape of this session, containing an
edit of Honeyspider (minus the feedback ending), and a version of
Daughter (with an additional minute and a half of feedback).

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
*T A Trip Unto Bountiful [Mother/Waiting]
*T Fat Man Blues
*T I Am One Part II
*T Vanilla
** Bleed
** Waiting For You Know
** Sun (abandoned)
** My Dahlia (abandoned)
** Stray Cat Blues
NOTE: This session was booked to record live-only favorites such as
Razor and I Am My End. Unfortunately Jimmy didn't show up and,
since the studio time was prepaid, it morphed into an acoustic
session. This was noted as a sloppy session with many false starts.
D'Arcy was present but did not perform.

1990 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Jesus Is The Sun
*T Translucent
NOTE: Unsure of exact recording information. May be demos recorded
at home or at rehearsal, rather than at a studio.

1990 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (Billy Corgan & Butch Vig)
La Dolly Vita
Tristessa (Sub-Pop version)
** La Dolly Vita

Summer 1990 - Smart Studio, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Jackie Blue

Dec 1990-Mar 1991 - Smart Studios, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Blue
Bury Me
Crush
Daydream
I Am One
I'm Going Crazy
Obscured
Rhinoceros
Siva
Slunk
Snail
Suffer
Tristessa
Why Am I So Tired
Window Paine
** Jesus Loves His Babies
** La Dolly Vita
NOTE: Gish was recorded to analog 16-track. To cut costs, each
instrument was recorded separately--drums, bass, then guitars, etc.
It is my guess that Why Am I So Tired is a Gish outtake/jam, based
on the stereophonic division and the general feel of the song. Jesus
Loves His Babies was a Gish outtake, and almost a B-side. A version
of Smiley may have been recorded during this session. Purr Snickety
might have been recorded at this time, rather than during the
Siamese sessions.

1991 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Luna
*T Wave Song
** STP
NOTE: Unreleased demos that all date from this period, although
exact recording information is unknown. "Wave Song" was written and
sung by James.

Spring 1992 - Waterfront Studios, New Jersey
** Drown
NOTE: The band's first of three attempts to record Drown. This one,
recorded at Lenny Kravitz's studio, was scrapped as the output
sounded more like a Kravitz recording!

March 1992 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (BC & Butch Vig)
Drown
** Drown (unfinished)
NOTE: The second attempt to record Drown proved useless, as Jimmy
began drinking as Billy & Butch set up and adjusted the sound; by
the time the band was ready to record, Jimmy was literally falling
of his stool drunk!

Spring 1992 - Billy's old apartment, Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Soothe
** Plume

Spring 1992 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan and Kerry Brown)
Bullet Train To Osaka
Hope
Plume
Starla
?* Moleasskiss

Fall 1992 - a Chicago studio [?]
** Quiet
** Kitty Kat [Hello Kitty Kat]
** Cherub Rock
** Suicide Kiss
** Today
** Disarm
** Rocket
** Spaceboy
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** Soma
** Whirl
** Doorstep [Meladori Magpie]
** Pissant
** Tulips
** Hummer
** French Movie Theme
NOTE: This is a tape of Siamese Dream demos submitted to Virgin
Records in 1992, called "Quiet and Other Songs: A Collection of
Songs for Album II." Doorstep is an early version of Meladori
Magpie and featured a full-band arrangement. Suicide Kiss was said
to have evolved into a number of different songs, including Geek
USA. Hello Kitty Kat was at this time simply titled Kitty Kat.

Dec 1992-Mar 1993 - Triclops Sound Studios, Georgia (BC & Butch Vig)
Apathy's Last Kiss
Cherub Rock
Disarm
Frail and Bedazzled
French Movie Theme
Geek USA
Hello Kitty Kat
Hummer
Infinite Sadness
Luna
Mayonaise
Mayonaise (acoustic click track)
Pissant
Pulseczar
Purr Snickety
Quiet
Rocket
Siamese Dream
Silverfuck
Sinfony
Soma
Spaceboy
Spaced
Sweet Sweet
Today
Whir
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings (unfinished version)
** Disarm (electric version)
** Doorstep
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** She Says
** Suicide Kiss
** Tulips
?* Spaceboy (alternate)
NOTE: Despite it's layers of guitar, Siamese dream was recorded more
in a live-band fashion than Gish was. I am guessing Pulseczar and
Sinfony are Siamese outtakes, although they could have been recorded
anytime. Purr Snickety might be a Gish outtake because it was
performed live on 7/21/91, although released as a Siamese B-side and
also registered with BMI during the Siamese Dream period. Contrary
to general belief, Infinite Sadness was recorded during the Siamese
sessions and at that time it was called Mellon Collie! An alternate
acoustic version of Mayonaise (erroneously dubbed a demo) was
*******d on the 1991-1998 promo; this is actually an alternate mix
of the released studio version, featuring the slightly phased
acoustic click track (which can be heard on the album version
notably at 3:35) and a tambourine. An alternate mix of Hello Kitty
Kat was *******d on the promo cassette of Siamese Dream, but was
subsequently stricken from the sequencing of the album when that mix
was lost.

Spring 1993 - Soundworks/Smart Studios (BC with B. Vig & Kerry Brown)
Blew Away
Glynis

Summer 1994 - Gravity Studios, Chicago
*T Jellybelly
*T Beautiful One [Ugly]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T No Escape [Weeping Willowly]
*T To Forgive Nothing Less
*T Blast
*T Descendo [Mouths of Babes]
*T And I Stumbled [Pennies]
*T Dizzle
*T A/Ab/E/B/F#
*T Rings
*T James Complex Song [So So Pretty]
*T With Longing
*T Straight Ab [Love]
*T Set the Ray to Jerry
*T The Innocents [Galapogos]
*T A Done [Speed]
*T Busy Downtune Bb/G [Lucky Lad]
*T Jackboot
*T New Wave A to G
*T A/B/G Drop A
*T Glamey Glamey [Marquis In Spades]
*T Walking Country
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T The Groover
*T New Wave Echo
*T Pretty Drop A [Millieu]
*T E Drone E/C#/A
*T Disconnected
NOTE: The band booked time at Gravity Studios mid-way through the
Siamese Dream Tour to record demos for their upcoming double album.
All tracks were instrumentals (with the exception of Bullet with
Butterfly Wings, which *******d a half-hearted scratch vocal), and
thus the recordings seem more of a jam-session. This session was
the source for a number of the Pastichio Medley tracks, as the songs
appear here as they do on the Medley. Most of the tracks also
feature extremely early working titles, some titled simply as their
chord progression. The song New Wave Echo is actually the song
known to bootleggers as Germans in Leather Pants (Shame On You) and,
despite much debate, is an original Pumpkins tune.

sometime in 1993 or 1994 - a studio [?]
?* Moonage Daydream
NOTE: A David Bowie cover recorded for a tribute album that was
ultimately scrapped. There is little to no information available on
this recording.

Fall 1994 - Bugg Studios (James's house), Chicago
Bugg Superstar
NOTE: It is my guess that James recorded Bugg Superstar solo at his
home for Vieuphoria/Earphoria. It is also my guess that there is
more incidental music for Vieuphoria that was unused.

Fall 1994 - Sadlands (Billy's house), Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Blank
Jupiter's Lament
Meladori Magpie
Rotten Apples
Stumbleine
*C Autumn Nocturne
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Galapogos
*C Frantic Ab Groove [Groove]
*C Here is not why [Here is no why]
*C Lily (my one and only)
*C Glamey Glamey [Marquis in Spades]
*C Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*C Ropey Lopey [Beautiful]
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Ugly/Beautiful [Ugly]
*C Wishing You Were
** Feelium
** God
NOTE: This session is what is known as the Mellon Collie Demo Tape.
Oddly enough, all tracks on this tape (except Mellon Collie and
Marquis in Spades) were pretty much registered with BMI in the
running order of the tape (with a few exceptions). This makes the
naming of the unknown songs much easier. The unknown instrumental
seems to be called Groove. The song incorrectly called Strolling
(Running with the leaves/Do as you please) is actually Autumn
Nocturne, and definitely NOT a 1979 demo. The final instrumental,
Ropey Lopey, was eventually incorporated into the interlude of
Beautiful. At this point in time, Here Is No Why was called Here Is
Not Why and Ugly was called Ugly/Beautiful. Marquis in Spades was
at this time called Glamey Glamey (as it was during the Gravity
Sessions), but it has been mis-published as Shamay. Electric demos
for Feelium and God exist, but are not in circulation.


Jan 1995 - a Chicago studio [?]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Set the Ray To Jerry
*T So Very Sad About Us
*T Jellybelly
*T Mouths of Babes
*T Here is no why
*T God
*T Love
*T For Martha (chorus section)
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T Methusela
*T Depresso
*T Zero (alt ver 1)
*T Zero (alt ver 2)
*T Here is no why (lyrics)
*T Cherry
*T Beautiful
*T (unknown)
NOTE: A rehearsal tape, possibly recorded at Pumpkinland or another
Chicago studio, dubbed the Mellon Collie Electric Demos. This tape
was apparently given to D'Acry to learn the then-new songs. Most
tracks are instrumentals, with the exception of Methusela, Here is
no why, and Beautiful that contain a double-tracked vocal.

Mar 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
NOTE: Before entering a studio to record Mellon Collie, Flood and
the Pumpkins went into Pumpkinland, their Chicago rehearsal space,
to run through all of the new material. This is probably the source
for many of the "Pasticio Medley" songs. Assuming that countless
hours of rehearsal was recorded, (including Mellon Collie tracks,
Mellon Collie B-sides, "Pasticio Medley" songs, unreleased songs,
and miscellaneous jamming) it is impossible to know, let alone list
what was recorded. MTV filmed a few days of rehearsal to be
*******d in the MTV Rockumentary on The Smashing Pumpkins. Evidence
suggests that video exists of "God" and "Rubberman." A bootleg
video, known as the '666 Video,' has surfaced which apparently is
the film shot by one camera over two days of rehearsal:

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T The Boy
*T Where Boys Fear To Tread
*T The Viper
*T Tribute To Johnny
*T Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
*T Rachel [early XYU instumental]

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T Thru the Eyes of Ruby
*T V-8
*T Rachel [early XYU with lyrics]
*T The Black Rider
*T The Tracer
*T Cupid de Locke
*T Zero

Mar-Aug 1995 - Chicago Recording Company (Flood, Alan Moulder, and BC)
Beautiful
Bodies
Bullet with Butterfly Wings
By Starlight
Cherry
Cupid de Locke
Farewell and Goodnight
Fuck You (an ode to no one)
Galapogos
God
Here is no why
In the Arms of Sleep
Jellybelly
Lily (my one and only)
Love
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
Muzzle
Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
Set the Ray to Jerry
Take Me Down
Tales of a Scorched Earth
Thirty-Three
Thru the Eyes of Ruby
To Forgive
Tonight, Tonight
Tonite Reprise
Tribute to Johnny
Ugly
We Only Come Out At Night
Where Boys Fear To Tread
XYU
Zero
1979
** A Dog's Prayer
** Feelium
** Jupiter's Lament (with whole band singing)
** Mellon Collie Reprise
** Methusela
** Mouths of Babes
** Phang
** Rock Me
** Spazmatazz
** Speed
** Speed Racer
** Ugly (3 alternate versions)
?* Keep It
NOTE: I am assuming that most of the Mellon Collie tracks were
recorded at CRC, although it is just as possible that some tracks
could have been culled from the Pumpkinland session. Keep It is
rumored to be an unreleased song, or at least evolved into another
song.

March-August 1995 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
Believe
Said Sadly
The Boy

May 31, 1995 - Chicago Recording Company; Sequence Four
*T Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*T Tonight Tonight
*T Jellybelly
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Fuck You
*T Muzzle
** Zero
** Here is no why
** To Forgive
** Love
** Cupid de Locke
** Galapogos
** Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
** Take Me Down
** Lily (my one and only)
NOTE: On this date, a rough mix of the Mellon Collie album was
created, dubbed Sequence Four. In other words, this tape was
basically what Mellon Collie sounded like as of May 31st. All songs
were rough takes and featured scratch vocals, if any; Galapogos even
featured a solo that was omitted from the final version.

August 1995 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood, Alan Moulder, & BC)
[all 28 Mellon Collie tracks mixed with overdubs]

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Marquis in Spades
Medellia of the Grey Skies (with The Frogs)
Mouths of Babes
Pennies
Sad Peter Pan (with Red Red Meat)
NOTE: I doubt that all these songs were recorded together at one
session, but is grouped together because they are all post-Mellon
Collie songs.

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
NOTE: At this time, Billy complied the sound collage known as
Pasticio Medley. The track consists of 10-second snippets of about
70 unreleased "songs," with a total running time of 23 minutes.
While many of the songs were most likely instrumental jams, it is
equally as possible that a number of the songs were actual
compositions with lyrics and a song structure--a few of the tracks
had already been registered through BMI half a year earlier! The
snippets were compiled from a variety of sources recorded after
Siamese Dream and the completion of Mellon Collie. Pasticio Medley
features, in order of appearance:
The Demon, Thunderbolt, Dearth, Knuckles, Star Song, Fire Power,
New Waver, Space Jam, Zoom, So Very Sad About Us, Phang, Speed
Racer, The Eternal E, Hairy Eyeball, The Groover, Hell Bent For
Hell, Rachel, A Dog's Prayer, Blast, The Black Rider, Slurpee,
Flipper, The Viper, Bitch, Fried, Harmonio, USA, The Tracer,
Envelope Woman, Plastic Guy, Glasgow 3AM, The Road Is Long,
Funkified, Rigamorole, Depresso, The Streets Are Hot Tonight,
Dawn at 16, Spazmatazz, Fucker, In the Arms of Sheep, Speed, 77,
Me Rock You Snow, Feelium, Is Alex Milton, Ruberman, Spacer,
Rock Me, Weeping Willowly, Rings, So So Pretty, Lucky Lad, Jackboot,
Millieu, Disconnected, Let Your Lazer Love Light Shine Down, Phreak,
Porkbelly, Robot Lover, Jimmy James, America, Slinkeepie, Dummy Tum
Tummy, Fakir, Jake, Camaro, Moonkids, Make It Fungus, V-8, and Die.

Mar 1996 - Charing Cross Studios, Australia (BC/Martin White)
The Aeroplane Flies High
The Last Song
Transformer
NOTE: These tracks were recorded in Australia, while on tour.
Further overdubs were recorded later in Chicago. They were mixed,
along with Eye, at Chung King Studios by Neil Perry.

June 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Clones
Destination Unknown
Dreaming
My Blue Heaven
You're All I've Got Tonight
June 1996 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
A Night Like This
The Bells
June 1996 - Farmer Brown's Studio (D'Arcy's house) (Kerry Brown)
Dreaming (vocal tracks)
NOTE: This session is very conjectural; The time frame is an
estimate and I doubt that all of these songs were recorded
together.

July 1996 - Chicago studio [?]
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** To Sheila
?* [about 7 more songs]
NOTE: First session for Adore, held shortly after Jimmy's release.
The Pumpkins functioned as a trio during this session. With about
10 songs hastily recorded in a week, the session was scrapped as
the finished product seemed more like demos.

Summer 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Eye
** Tear
NOTE: Billy actually recorded two songs for the Lost Highway
Soundtrack. The second was an early version of Tear, which was
rejected.

September 1996 - Chung King, NY (Chris Shepard/Neil Perry & BC)
Lizards
Rats
Spiders
Squirrels with Tails
Worms
Worms (part 2)
NOTE: Recorded in about a week, this was just Billy Corgan and Matt
Walker recording riffs for the Ransom Soundtrack. Billy's scant
vocals were recorded on a mini tape dictaphone recorder.
These songs were curiously copyrighted as Parallel Stories.

December 1996 - The New Hit Factory, NY (Arif Mardin/Michael O'Riley)
Christmastime

Feb 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Billy Corgan/Chris Shepard)
Annie-Dog
Once In A While
The Ether's Tragic
The Guns of Love Disastrous
** Blissed and Gone
** Chewing Gum
** Do You Close Your Eyes
** For Martha (instrumental)
** My Mistake
** The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
** The End is The Beginning is the End
** The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
?* [about 20 other Adore demos]
?* [about 8 or 10 other Batman demos]
NOTE: The Pumpkins (with Matt Walker) supposedly recorded about 45
minutes worth of demos for the Batman soundtrack, so Guns of Love
and Ethers Tragic are probably from that tape. Roughly 30 demos for
the album Adore were also recorded at this time, so I'm sure both
the Adore and Batman demos where recorded at this session; the album
version of Annie-Dog was drawn from these sessions.

March 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Nellee Hooper/Chris Shepard)
The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
The End is the Beginning is the End
NOTE: Recorded in Studio 5, which was demolished a few months later.

August-September 1997 - Streeterville Studios, Chicago
NOTE: This session was confirmed, but it is unknown what was
recorded and by whom. This could be part of the Wood sessions,
or somehow related to it. Does anyone have any more info?

Fall 1997 - Chicago Trax Recording and Hinge Chicago (Brad Wood)
Ava Adore
Behold! The Night Mare
Blank Page
Daphne Descends
Tear
To Sheila
NOTE: This session for Adore was originally scrapped, but was
latter used as the basic tracks for the album with overdubs and
such recorded later in California.

Nov-Mar 1998 - Sunset Sound, California (Billy Corgan/Neil Perry)
Appels + Oranjes
Blissed and Gone
Crestfallen
Czarina
For Martha
Once In A While
Once Upon A Time
Perfect
Pug
Shame
Summer
The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
Waiting
17
** Cash Car Star
** Saturnine
?* [7 or 8 more songs]
NOTE: Although Adore was mostly recorded at Studio 2 at Sunset
Sound, many tracks were pieced together from other sessions at:
Battery Studios, Bugg Studios, Chicago Recording Company, Sadlands,
and Village Recorder. Waiting and Saturnine were merely unfinished
song fragments. There are conflicting reports to as how much
material was recorded; it has been suggested that there are
approximately 14 or 15 more finished songs from the Adore sessions,
but Neil Perry says that 40-odd songs or song fragments were
recorded.

March 1998 - Sound City, California (Rick Rubin/Sylvia Massey)
** Let Me Give The World To You
NOTE: The last song recorded for Adore, it was taken off the album
at the last second and remains unreleased. The finished version was
apparently a stripped down arrangement, which *******d: guitar,
bass, organ, and drums by Joey Waronker.

Late 1998 - Sadlands, Chicago
** If There Is A God
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 1)
** Wound (3/4 time)
** Le Deux Machina (keyboard version)
** Vanity
** Glass and the Ghost Children
** Autumn (instrumental)
** Drain
** Laugh
** Here I Am
** Lover
** Let Me Give The World To You
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 2)
** Speed Kills
NOTE: Acoustic demos for the Machina album, recorded at Billy's
home. The tape *******s two lyrically different versions of Blue
Skies Bring Tears, one containing the lyrics from the arrangement of
the song performed during The Arising! Tour in April 1999. Lover is
the song bootlegged as Don't Wanna Be Your Lover or One Less Moment.

Nov 1998-Sept 1999 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Blue Skies Bring Tears
Glass and the Ghost Children
Heavy Metal Machine
I of the Mourning
Raindrops + Sunshowers
Speed Kills
Stand Inside Your Love
The Everlasting Gaze
The Imploding Voice
The Crying Tree of Mercury
The Sacred and Profane
This Time
Try, Try, Try
With Every Light
Wound
*T Dross
*T Glass Theme
*T Here's To The Atom Bomb
*T If There Is A God
*T Real Love
** Cash Car Star
** Go
** Home
** Let Me Give The World To You
?* Bringing The Weather
?* Death Boogie
?* In My Body
?* Jam 13
?* Saturnine
NOTE: Machina was haphazardly recorded at Pumpkinland over a span of
ten months. Many alternate versions exist of the songs, as the band
consistently toyed with their arrangement. The songs on the final
album often consisted of combinations of a few different
arrangements of each song. In other words, the Machina tracks
continually evolved throughout the year, and the tape was rolling
during their transformation.
Radio was an early incarnation of I of the Mourning, just as Slow
Songs was of Crying Tree of Mercury and Disco King was of The
Everlasting Gaze. The second movement of Glass and the Ghost
Children is actually a bit of the six-minute Le Deux Machina (which
multiple versions exist of). Go is apparently a James song that was
left off the album.
A tape called "Friends and Enemies of Modern Music" has surfaced,
most likely compiled early on during the sessions. The tape
*******d early mixes and recordings of several Machina tracks (most
with live-band arrangements) as well as soundboard recordings of
Money (That's What I Want) and XYU from the 10/31/98 show. The tape
also *******d an alternate Heavy Metal Machine with both different
lyrics and a different main riff, and an arrangement of Blue Skies
Bring Tears much like The Arising! version.

Oct 1999 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Age of Innocence
NOTE: Recorded at that last second, and tagged onto the album,
possibly as sort of an afterthought. D'Arcy most likely did not
play bass on the song.

July 2000 - Chicago Recording Company
*? Lucky 13
*? White Spiders
NOTE: Sessions for the final Smashing Pumpkins album. The band is
said to be working on unfinished tracks from the Machina Sessions.


================================================== ======================

Television and Radio Performances

The Smashing Pumpkins, like many other bands, have performed nation and
worldwide on various media formats. The following is a chronology of
the band's television and radio performances, along with any concert
performances that have been officially released.


Nov 16, 1988 - WNUR Radio, Evanston, Illinois
** My Eternity
** Venus In Furs
NOTE: It was noted that Jimmy had recently joined the band. It has
been unconfirmed if more tracks were performed or not.

Mar 16, 1989 - WZRD Radio, Chicago, Illinois
*T Cinnamon Girl
*T East
*T My Eternity
*T Nothing and Everything
*T Rhinoceros
*T Snap (If I Could)
*T Spiteface
*T Sun
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
*T Venus In Furs
NOTE: A live performance upon the release of the Light Into Dark
compilation. This was possibly one of the first performances of
Rhinoceros.

June 23, 1991 - Rose Records, Chicago (Mike Rubano)
Terrapin
*T Blue
*T Bury Me
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Smiley
*T Suffer

Sept 8, 1991 - Maida Vaile Studios, London (Dale Griffin)
Girl Named Sandoz
Siva
Smiley
NOTE: The slightly infamous John Peel Sessions.

Jan 15, 1992 - VPRO Radio session, Hilversum, Holland
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Silverfuck
*T Snail

1992 - Nippon Television, Japan
Slunk (live Vieuphoria version)

September 1992 - BBC Late Show, London
*C Rhinoceros

June 22, 1993 - MTV Most Wanted, London; live acoustic performance
Cherub Rock (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
** Disarm

June 23, 1993 - Studio 10S, Paris, France; live acoustic performance
*C Cherub Rock
*C Dancing in the Moonlight
*C Disarm
*T Drown
*T Hummer
*T Kooks
*T Luna
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rocket
*C Siva
*C Spaceboy
*C Suffer
*C Today

June 30, 1993 - VPRO Radio for Villa '65, Netherlands (Hans Bunt)
Dancing in the Moonlight
Spaceboy (live NME version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Rocket
*T Today

July 26, 1993 - Tower Records, Chicago; live acoustic performance
Rocket (acoustic ONXRT version)
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Mayonaise
*T Siva
*C Today

July 30, 1993 - Naked City, UK TV; live acoustic performance
Mayonaise (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Exact recording date unknown, although it was originally
broadcasted on July 30, 1993.

September 3, 1993 - Alabamhalle, Germany; live performance
Geek USA (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Telepool Productions. Although recorded on
September 3, 1993, it was originally broadcasted on Feb. 21, 1994.
Also performed: Cherub Rock, Disarm, Rocket, Quiet, Today, Drown,
Hummer, Soma, Siva, Silverfuck.

September 1993 - The Word, BBC Studios, London; live performance
Disarm (live Vieuphoria version)
*C Sunshine of Your Love
NOTE: Recorded by Planet 24, Channel 4 London. Although recorded in
September of 1993, it was broadcasted on February 18, 1994.

September 1993 - Sala Apollo, Barcelona; live performance
I Am One (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Sputnik de Televisio de Catalunya. Originally
broadcasted on March 4, 1994. Also performed: Rocket, Quiet, Today,
Disarm, Soma, Cherub Rock, and Silverfuck.

September 12, 1993 - BBC Radio One Studios, London (Ted de Bono)
Landslide
Never Let Me Down
** Disarm

October 1993 - MTV No Alternative session; live performance
Glynis (live No Alternative version)
Today (live No Alternative version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Geek USA
*T I Am One

October 28, 1993 - NBC Studio 8-H, New York; SNL rehearsals
*C Cherub Rock (2 takes)
*C Today (2 takes)

October 30, 1993 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Cherub Rock
*C Today

November 10, 1993 - Atlanta, Georgia; live performance
Quiet (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Modi for Modivational Films and produced by
Merril Ward. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

December 10, 1993 - Aragon Ballroom, Chicago; live performance
Today (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Jam Productions. Live audio remix by Butch Vig
at Smart Studios. Also performed: Geek USA, Quiet, Disarm, Siva,
Drown, Hummer, Cherub Rock, Rocket, Soma, I Am One, Spaceboy, Bury
Me, and Silverfuck.

December 12, 1993 - Universal, Los Angeles; live acoustic performance
Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Rocket
*C Spaceboy
*C Today

February 24, 1994 - Astoria Theatre, London; live performance
Silverfuck (live Vieuphoria version)
Soma (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Bret Turnbull and produced by Sarah Bayliss for
Medialab. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

September 8, 1994 - MTV Music Awards, New York; live performance
*T Disarm

October 23, 1995 - Riviera Theatre, Chicago; live performance
Bullet with Butterfly Wings (live Launch CD ROM version)
Disarm (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Today (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Tonight, Tonight (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Zero (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
NOTE: A live show recorded and broadcasted live on FM radio. 5
tracks were systematically released on promo and multimedia discs.
Also performed: Jellybelly, Fuck You, Thru the Eyes of Ruby, Geek
USA, Porcelina of the Vast Oceans, Cherub Rock, Mayonaise, XYU,
Baby Loves to Rock, If You Want My Love and Auf Weidersehen.

Nov 11, 1995 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Zero

December 1995 - The White Room, Westwood Studios, UK TV; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

December 10, 1995 - Canal+, French TV, France; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

January 29, 1996 - American Music Awards, Shrine Auditorium, LA; live
*C 1979

March 13, 1996 - Triple J Studios, Sydney, Australia; live acoustic
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Cupid de Locke
*C Muzzle
*C Take Me Down
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Tonight, Tonight
*C 1979

Sept 4, 1996 - MTV Music Video Awards, Radio City Music Hall, NY; live
*C Tonight, Tonight

November 14, 1996 - MTV Europe Music Video Awards; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

February 25, 1997 - NBC Studios, NY; live performance
*C Muzzle

Feb 26, 1997 - Academy Awards, Madison Square Garden, NY; live
1979 (live Grammy Nominees version)

May 12, 1998 - Late with Jools Holland, BBC Studios, London; live
*T Ava Adore
*T Daphne Descends
*T Once Upon A Time

May 20, 1998 - RTVE Studios, Madrid, Spain
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Tear
** To Sheila

July 9, 1998 - Q101 Studios, Chicago
** Perfect

July 19, 1998 - Much Music Studios, Toronto, Canada
** Ava Adore
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings
** For Martha
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Pug
** Shame
** To Sheila
** Transmission
** 1979

July 30, 1998 - Late Show with David Letterman, 53rd Street, New York
** Ava Adore
** Crestfallen
** Perfect
** Pug
** To Sheila
** 1979

August 3, 1998 - Howard Stern Show, New York
** Perfect

August 4, 1998 - Live with Regis and Kathy Lee, New York
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect

May-Sept 1998 - Adore Tour, various locations around the globe
NOTE: Almost all of the dates on the Adore Tour were professionally
taped by the band and sometimes by the local media. The film was to
be used for a full-length documentary on the Adore Tour, directed by
Jesse Ignjatovic. This film was never finished and will most likely
never be released, due to conflicts in the editing process.

September 26, 1998 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studios, New York; live
** Perfect

October 25, 1998 - VH1 Fashion Awards, New York; live performance
** Crestfallen

Jan 17, 2000 - Canal+, Nulle Part Ailleurs, France
** The Everlasting Gaze

Jan 30, 2000 - ABC Studios, Los Angles, Politically Incorrect
** The Everlasting Gaze
** Stand Inside Your Love

Mar 9, 2000 - MTV Studios, Total Request Live, New York
** The Everlasting Gaze
** I of the Mourning
** XYU (jam)

April 26, 2000 - Ed Sullivan Theatre, NY, Late Night w/ Dave Letterman
** I of the Mourning


================================================== ======================

Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings

Appendix A consists of a list of unreleased song titles that have been
performed live. Some title have already been noted in the General
Recording Chronology; thus, the song was performed live but the studio
version was not released. The remaining titles were performed live and
were either not officially recorded in a studio or otherwise, or the
recording information is unavailable.
The entries ******* a selected date and location the song was
performed. The provided date may not necessarily be the only
performance date, but is only the most available, of best soundquality,
or most definitive in the context of bootlegs and concert tapes.
Appendix A only *******s Smashing Pumpkins originals, or songs only
written by Billy Corgan, James Iha, or Billy Corgan and James Iha (as
many of the earlier songs were). Covers and improvisational jams are
not *******d.


The Vigil Chicago 8/10/88
Armed To The Teeth " "
I Fall " "
6234 " "
Holiday " "
Screaming " "
There It Goes Chicago 10/5/88
My Eternity " "
Under Your Spell " "
She " "
Bleed " "
Oiu Henri Chicago 11/23/88
Alabaster Chicago 4/30/89
Salt Chicago 10/31/89
Lie I Lie ??/??/89
365 ??/??/90
I'll Never Change ??/??/90
Morning Jam ??/??/90
Opal Worship ??/??/90
Razor Madison 6/16/90
Try To Try Madison 6/16/90
Over You Cincinnati 9/13/90
Jesus Loves His Babies Chicago 6/22/91
I Am My End Seattle 8/20/91
What You Wanted Seattle 8/20/91
Offer Up Paris 2/5/92
Chump ??/??/92
Towers of Rabble Chicago 2/21/95
Speed Chicago 2/21/95
Space Jam Vancouver 1/8/97
Let Me Give The World To You Hamburg 5/14/98
Cash Car Star Los Angeles 10/31/98
Lover Los Angeles 12/12/98
If There Is A God Los Angeles 12/12/98
Dross Detroit 4/10/99
Glass Theme " "
Home " "
Pale Scales (instrumental) Chicago 12/20/99


================================================== ======================

Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise

Appendix B consists of selected commentary concerning a few of the more
"puzzling" aspects of The Smashing Pumpkins music. As with any band
with a breathtaking amount of output, there is sure to be a number of
debates and controversies over unknown song titles, the identity of
various demos, etc.
If you have any contributions to Appendix B, don't be afraid to send
them to me. They will be *******d and your credit will be given.


- IS STP REALLY SET THE RAY TO JERRY?

I have heard rumors that STP is an early version of Set The Ray To
Jerry. I find this hard to believe, as I'm sure someone incorrectly
thought STP was the abbreviation for Set The Ray For Jerry (wouldn't
it be STRTJ or SRJ?). Does anyone have any other substantial info?


- OFFER UP (LONG) IS ACTUALLY JELLYBELLY

The title for the song formerly and incorrectly known as Offer Up
(Long) has been discovered! The song is actually an extremely early
version of Jellybelly (which was what the song was called in '92),
that often had lyrics from Offer Up tagged at the end of it.
For those who are wondering, the old Jellybelly's riff's were
inverted and the song evolved twice over the coursed of the three
years, until it's eventual release on Mellon Collie.


- ZOOM IS REALLY SPACE JAM

Dave Mead convinced me that the song we all know and love as Zoom is
not called Zoom at all, but Space Jam. It seems that an error was
made when calculating the time on the Pasticio Medley. He also says
the title Space Jam was confirmed by a source close to the band.


================================================== ======================

Online References

Eric Agnew, Smashing Pumpkins Fan Collaborative
Steve Hemming, Smashing Pumpkins Collection
David Mead, Faded Photographs
Josh Provost, Smashing Pumpkins Live Recording Association

Reel Time Studios - http://www.reeltimestudios.com
BMI Music Publishing - http://www.bmi.com

Dave Asselin, Smashing Pumpkins Text Based Discography
Karl Daher, Smashing Pumpkins Compact Disc Bootlist
Mike Hamilton and Vince Horst, Smashing Pumpkins FAQ
Jesse Miller, The Mashed Potatoes FAQ


================================================== ======================

Jesse Miller

The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions
http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html

Now featured at SPFC.org!!!
http://www.spfc.org/band/studio.html

Mirrored at:
http://www.netphoria.org/recording/recording.html
http://wound.hypermart.com/sprecordings.txt
http://www.smashing-pumpkins.net/recording/index.html
http://blamo.org/sp/sessions.txt


EOF


i can't believe anyone would go to all that trouble

 
Luke de Spa is offline
Old 06-10-2007, 12:59 PM   #36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luke de Spa
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions


Version 3.2 - August 2000


compiled and maintained by:
Jesse Miller


================================================== ======================

Table of Contents

Introduction
Acknowledgements
Key To Recording Chronology Entries
General Recording Chronology
Attack: 1988-1992
Sustain: 1993-1996
Decay: 1997-2000
Television and Radio Performances
Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings
Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise
Online References


================================================== ======================

Introduction

The Smashing Pumpkins are arguably one of the greatest American rock
bands of the 1990s. They initially-- and to this day-- made music for
themselves, as opposed to the Goth and Industrial scenes in Chicago
during the late 1980s, or even the Pop and Hair Metal that dominated
the nationwide charts. Despite composing music completely unique and
genuine, The Smashing Pumpkins were labeled as a psychedelic/grunge
band and were brought into the limelight in 1992, along with the rush
of other acts that were paradoxically labeled as "Alternative" bands;
the aforementioned labels would be oversimplifying The Smashing
Pumpkins' output, spanning over a decade and roughly 400 songs.
As well as a tremendous live act, The Smashing Pumpkins also
recorded albums of quality far superior to that of their contemporaries.
I personally maintain that The Smashing Pumpkins are one of the only
remaining rock bands who use the recording studio to it's fullest,
joining the likes of Radiohead and The Flaming Lips to create records
that defy conventional rock and roll and cross the inconceivable barrier
into Art-Rock. Only a musical group of this magnitude would make their
third studio release a conceptual, double-album!
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions attempts to chronicle the
recordings of The Smashing Pumpkins, including: studio recording
sessions, home and studio demos, radio sessions, television
performances, and concert performances that have been officially
released. This document has been compiled from a number of sources, not
infrequently utilizing mere speculation; thus this document often
contains entries that are pure conjecture. Unless I am invited to
examine and document the band's mastertapes in the Virgin vaults
sometime in the near future, the conjecture will have to do! This
reveals the importance of the contributions by you, the dear reader; if
you have any information that could be useful in the SPRS, please e-mail
me-- of course you will be recognized for your bravery.
The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions was originally compiled in
1996; it was finally uploaded onto the World Wide Web two years later,
in the January of 1998. The format of the SPRS was inspired the Nirvana
Recording Sessions and Song List, by John Loughney. The SPRS was last
updated in July, 2000. The latest version can be found at:

http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html


================================================== ======================

Acknowledgements

The following souls should be recognized for their contributions to the
Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions, whether they like it or not:

Eric Agnew, Dave Asselin, Simon Coyle, Karl Daher, Steve Hemming,
David Mead, Josh Provost, and all others in the online Smashing Pumpkins
community; if were not for their enlightening sites and gracious
information, the community would not be where it is now.

Mark Ignoffo, Neil Perry, and Ron Roesing for providing the
desperately needed, first-hand perspective on the recordings of The
Smashing Pumpkins. I cannot accurately describe how important their
information has been, and I am honored to have had the chance to hear
from them.

And to all the others who have provided the vital information that
kept this document alive for the past two years: Carmen Diane Dodge,
Matt Galek, Mike Harmon, Christopher Hill, Marquis, Moonkids, Clint,
John, Tim, Ville, and Zach.

One final shout-out to Mason Butler for providing the webspace and
html editing for this document, as well as putting up with my constant
barrage of Smashing Pumpkins-related rantings, ravings, and theories
over the past five years. Rawk on, Stereo Sonic!


================================================== ======================

Key To Chronology Entries

Date - Studio, Location (Producer/Engineer)
Released song
** Unreleased song
*C Unreleased song; available through commercial bootleg CDs
*T Unreleased song; available through tape trading
?* Unsure of exact information
NOTE: Additional information is sometimes provided.


Please refer to Dave Asselin's Smashing Pumpkins Text-Based Discography
for official release information.


================================================== ======================

General Recording Chronology

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
** Breathe
** It Suites Me Well [The Vigil]
** Heart / Cross
NOTE: An early demo called Nothing Ever Changes. The lineup
*******d: Billy, James, and Ron Roesing (formerly of The Marked) on
drums; this could be viewed as the very first recording that ceased
to be The Marked and became The Smashing Pumpkins. Heart and Cross
were originally two separate songs, but were joined together into
one. It Suits Me Well is actually The Vigil.
Although a tape exists as the aforementioned 3-song configuration,
The original Nothing Ever Changes was about 60 minutes in length and
was Billy's first attempt at a full-length album; it contained a
combination of songs, spoken word selections (recalled as "bad
poetry"), and instrumentals.

1988 - Billy's father's home studio, Chicago
*T Break [My Dahlia]
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
?* Armed To The Teeth
?* Screaming
?* Sun
?* Holiday
?* I Fall
NOTE: About 12 songs were recorded by Billy and James, using a drum
machine. My Dahlia was at this time titled Break; Sun was called
Death of a Mind and featured an alternate chorus.

Late 1988 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Mark Ignoffo)
Sun
My Dahlia
*T East
NOTE: The first of many recordings with Mark Ignoffo, as the
sessions were described as an "on-going project." Sun and My Dahlia
were recorded and put on the Light Into Dark compilation. This
recording of Sun was later remixed by Quentin Sanbria and put on the
first demo tape.

Late 1988 - Schwa Productions, Chicago (Quentin Sanbria/Paul Chabala)
*C East
*C Jennifer Ever
*C Nothing and Everything
*C Spiteface
NOTE: Sessions for the first demo tape, aptly titled The Smashing
Pumpkins. Also *******d was a live version of She, and a remixed
version of Sun from the Ignoffo Sessions. The master tapes of this
session have apparently been lost, as they are no longer in the
band's possession.

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
Bye June
Daughter
Honeyspider
Honeyspider (alternate)
I Am One
Not Worth Asking
*C Bury Me
*C C'mon
*C Daydream
*C Egg
*C Love (old demo version)
*C Psychodelic
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rhinoceros (alternate)
*C Snap (If I Could)
*C Stars Fall In
*C With You
** Cinnamon Girl
NOTE: These sessions spawned both the second demo tape Moon, and
what is known as the Gish Basement Tape, a promotional cassette used
for bookings and label solicitation in 1989 and 1990. A few others
were officially released elsewhere: I Am One and Not Worth Asking
appeared on the Limited Potential 7"; Bye June was officially
released on the Lull EP and was also *******d on Moon; Daughter was
released on the Reflex Magazine flexi-disc and also *******d on
Moon. Two versions of Honeyspider were recorded: a distorted,
rocking version was released on the Tristessa 12" and a quieter,
clean-toned version was put on Moon, but remains officially
unreleased. Just as well, two unreleased versions of Rhinoceros
were recorded: an odd version with an organ solo played by Mark
Ignoffo was put on Moon, and a version closer to the Gish album
version was put on the Gish Basement Tape.
There is apparently a 21-song tape of this session, containing an
edit of Honeyspider (minus the feedback ending), and a version of
Daughter (with an additional minute and a half of feedback).

1989 - Reel Time Studios, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Mark Ignoffo)
*T A Trip Unto Bountiful [Mother/Waiting]
*T Fat Man Blues
*T I Am One Part II
*T Vanilla
** Bleed
** Waiting For You Know
** Sun (abandoned)
** My Dahlia (abandoned)
** Stray Cat Blues
NOTE: This session was booked to record live-only favorites such as
Razor and I Am My End. Unfortunately Jimmy didn't show up and,
since the studio time was prepaid, it morphed into an acoustic
session. This was noted as a sloppy session with many false starts.
D'Arcy was present but did not perform.

1990 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Jesus Is The Sun
*T Translucent
NOTE: Unsure of exact recording information. May be demos recorded
at home or at rehearsal, rather than at a studio.

1990 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (Billy Corgan & Butch Vig)
La Dolly Vita
Tristessa (Sub-Pop version)
** La Dolly Vita

Summer 1990 - Smart Studio, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Jackie Blue

Dec 1990-Mar 1991 - Smart Studios, Madison, WI (BC and Butch Vig)
Blue
Bury Me
Crush
Daydream
I Am One
I'm Going Crazy
Obscured
Rhinoceros
Siva
Slunk
Snail
Suffer
Tristessa
Why Am I So Tired
Window Paine
** Jesus Loves His Babies
** La Dolly Vita
NOTE: Gish was recorded to analog 16-track. To cut costs, each
instrument was recorded separately--drums, bass, then guitars, etc.
It is my guess that Why Am I So Tired is a Gish outtake/jam, based
on the stereophonic division and the general feel of the song. Jesus
Loves His Babies was a Gish outtake, and almost a B-side. A version
of Smiley may have been recorded during this session. Purr Snickety
might have been recorded at this time, rather than during the
Siamese sessions.

1991 - Chicago demos [?]
*T Luna
*T Wave Song
** STP
NOTE: Unreleased demos that all date from this period, although
exact recording information is unknown. "Wave Song" was written and
sung by James.

Spring 1992 - Waterfront Studios, New Jersey
** Drown
NOTE: The band's first of three attempts to record Drown. This one,
recorded at Lenny Kravitz's studio, was scrapped as the output
sounded more like a Kravitz recording!

March 1992 - Smart Studios, Madison, Wisconsin (BC & Butch Vig)
Drown
** Drown (unfinished)
NOTE: The second attempt to record Drown proved useless, as Jimmy
began drinking as Billy & Butch set up and adjusted the sound; by
the time the band was ready to record, Jimmy was literally falling
of his stool drunk!

Spring 1992 - Billy's old apartment, Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Soothe
** Plume

Spring 1992 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan and Kerry Brown)
Bullet Train To Osaka
Hope
Plume
Starla
?* Moleasskiss

Fall 1992 - a Chicago studio [?]
** Quiet
** Kitty Kat [Hello Kitty Kat]
** Cherub Rock
** Suicide Kiss
** Today
** Disarm
** Rocket
** Spaceboy
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** Soma
** Whirl
** Doorstep [Meladori Magpie]
** Pissant
** Tulips
** Hummer
** French Movie Theme
NOTE: This is a tape of Siamese Dream demos submitted to Virgin
Records in 1992, called "Quiet and Other Songs: A Collection of
Songs for Album II." Doorstep is an early version of Meladori
Magpie and featured a full-band arrangement. Suicide Kiss was said
to have evolved into a number of different songs, including Geek
USA. Hello Kitty Kat was at this time simply titled Kitty Kat.

Dec 1992-Mar 1993 - Triclops Sound Studios, Georgia (BC & Butch Vig)
Apathy's Last Kiss
Cherub Rock
Disarm
Frail and Bedazzled
French Movie Theme
Geek USA
Hello Kitty Kat
Hummer
Infinite Sadness
Luna
Mayonaise
Mayonaise (acoustic click track)
Pissant
Pulseczar
Purr Snickety
Quiet
Rocket
Siamese Dream
Silverfuck
Sinfony
Soma
Spaceboy
Spaced
Sweet Sweet
Today
Whir
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings (unfinished version)
** Disarm (electric version)
** Doorstep
** Set the Ray to Jerry
** She Says
** Suicide Kiss
** Tulips
?* Spaceboy (alternate)
NOTE: Despite it's layers of guitar, Siamese dream was recorded more
in a live-band fashion than Gish was. I am guessing Pulseczar and
Sinfony are Siamese outtakes, although they could have been recorded
anytime. Purr Snickety might be a Gish outtake because it was
performed live on 7/21/91, although released as a Siamese B-side and
also registered with BMI during the Siamese Dream period. Contrary
to general belief, Infinite Sadness was recorded during the Siamese
sessions and at that time it was called Mellon Collie! An alternate
acoustic version of Mayonaise (erroneously dubbed a demo) was
*******d on the 1991-1998 promo; this is actually an alternate mix
of the released studio version, featuring the slightly phased
acoustic click track (which can be heard on the album version
notably at 3:35) and a tambourine. An alternate mix of Hello Kitty
Kat was *******d on the promo cassette of Siamese Dream, but was
subsequently stricken from the sequencing of the album when that mix
was lost.

Spring 1993 - Soundworks/Smart Studios (BC with B. Vig & Kerry Brown)
Blew Away
Glynis

Summer 1994 - Gravity Studios, Chicago
*T Jellybelly
*T Beautiful One [Ugly]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T No Escape [Weeping Willowly]
*T To Forgive Nothing Less
*T Blast
*T Descendo [Mouths of Babes]
*T And I Stumbled [Pennies]
*T Dizzle
*T A/Ab/E/B/F#
*T Rings
*T James Complex Song [So So Pretty]
*T With Longing
*T Straight Ab [Love]
*T Set the Ray to Jerry
*T The Innocents [Galapogos]
*T A Done [Speed]
*T Busy Downtune Bb/G [Lucky Lad]
*T Jackboot
*T New Wave A to G
*T A/B/G Drop A
*T Glamey Glamey [Marquis In Spades]
*T Walking Country
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T The Groover
*T New Wave Echo
*T Pretty Drop A [Millieu]
*T E Drone E/C#/A
*T Disconnected
NOTE: The band booked time at Gravity Studios mid-way through the
Siamese Dream Tour to record demos for their upcoming double album.
All tracks were instrumentals (with the exception of Bullet with
Butterfly Wings, which *******d a half-hearted scratch vocal), and
thus the recordings seem more of a jam-session. This session was
the source for a number of the Pastichio Medley tracks, as the songs
appear here as they do on the Medley. Most of the tracks also
feature extremely early working titles, some titled simply as their
chord progression. The song New Wave Echo is actually the song
known to bootleggers as Germans in Leather Pants (Shame On You) and,
despite much debate, is an original Pumpkins tune.

sometime in 1993 or 1994 - a studio [?]
?* Moonage Daydream
NOTE: A David Bowie cover recorded for a tribute album that was
ultimately scrapped. There is little to no information available on
this recording.

Fall 1994 - Bugg Studios (James's house), Chicago
Bugg Superstar
NOTE: It is my guess that James recorded Bugg Superstar solo at his
home for Vieuphoria/Earphoria. It is also my guess that there is
more incidental music for Vieuphoria that was unused.

Fall 1994 - Sadlands (Billy's house), Chicago (Billy Corgan)
Blank
Jupiter's Lament
Meladori Magpie
Rotten Apples
Stumbleine
*C Autumn Nocturne
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Galapogos
*C Frantic Ab Groove [Groove]
*C Here is not why [Here is no why]
*C Lily (my one and only)
*C Glamey Glamey [Marquis in Spades]
*C Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*C Ropey Lopey [Beautiful]
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Ugly/Beautiful [Ugly]
*C Wishing You Were
** Feelium
** God
NOTE: This session is what is known as the Mellon Collie Demo Tape.
Oddly enough, all tracks on this tape (except Mellon Collie and
Marquis in Spades) were pretty much registered with BMI in the
running order of the tape (with a few exceptions). This makes the
naming of the unknown songs much easier. The unknown instrumental
seems to be called Groove. The song incorrectly called Strolling
(Running with the leaves/Do as you please) is actually Autumn
Nocturne, and definitely NOT a 1979 demo. The final instrumental,
Ropey Lopey, was eventually incorporated into the interlude of
Beautiful. At this point in time, Here Is No Why was called Here Is
Not Why and Ugly was called Ugly/Beautiful. Marquis in Spades was
at this time called Glamey Glamey (as it was during the Gravity
Sessions), but it has been mis-published as Shamay. Electric demos
for Feelium and God exist, but are not in circulation.


Jan 1995 - a Chicago studio [?]
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Set the Ray To Jerry
*T So Very Sad About Us
*T Jellybelly
*T Mouths of Babes
*T Here is no why
*T God
*T Love
*T For Martha (chorus section)
*T Tonight, Tonight
*T Methusela
*T Depresso
*T Zero (alt ver 1)
*T Zero (alt ver 2)
*T Here is no why (lyrics)
*T Cherry
*T Beautiful
*T (unknown)
NOTE: A rehearsal tape, possibly recorded at Pumpkinland or another
Chicago studio, dubbed the Mellon Collie Electric Demos. This tape
was apparently given to D'Acry to learn the then-new songs. Most
tracks are instrumentals, with the exception of Methusela, Here is
no why, and Beautiful that contain a double-tracked vocal.

Mar 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
NOTE: Before entering a studio to record Mellon Collie, Flood and
the Pumpkins went into Pumpkinland, their Chicago rehearsal space,
to run through all of the new material. This is probably the source
for many of the "Pasticio Medley" songs. Assuming that countless
hours of rehearsal was recorded, (including Mellon Collie tracks,
Mellon Collie B-sides, "Pasticio Medley" songs, unreleased songs,
and miscellaneous jamming) it is impossible to know, let alone list
what was recorded. MTV filmed a few days of rehearsal to be
*******d in the MTV Rockumentary on The Smashing Pumpkins. Evidence
suggests that video exists of "God" and "Rubberman." A bootleg
video, known as the '666 Video,' has surfaced which apparently is
the film shot by one camera over two days of rehearsal:

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T The Boy
*T Where Boys Fear To Tread
*T The Viper
*T Tribute To Johnny
*T Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
*T Rachel [early XYU instumental]

Mar 2, 1995 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood, Alan Moulder, BC)
*T Thru the Eyes of Ruby
*T V-8
*T Rachel [early XYU with lyrics]
*T The Black Rider
*T The Tracer
*T Cupid de Locke
*T Zero

Mar-Aug 1995 - Chicago Recording Company (Flood, Alan Moulder, and BC)
Beautiful
Bodies
Bullet with Butterfly Wings
By Starlight
Cherry
Cupid de Locke
Farewell and Goodnight
Fuck You (an ode to no one)
Galapogos
God
Here is no why
In the Arms of Sleep
Jellybelly
Lily (my one and only)
Love
Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
Muzzle
Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
Set the Ray to Jerry
Take Me Down
Tales of a Scorched Earth
Thirty-Three
Thru the Eyes of Ruby
To Forgive
Tonight, Tonight
Tonite Reprise
Tribute to Johnny
Ugly
We Only Come Out At Night
Where Boys Fear To Tread
XYU
Zero
1979
** A Dog's Prayer
** Feelium
** Jupiter's Lament (with whole band singing)
** Mellon Collie Reprise
** Methusela
** Mouths of Babes
** Phang
** Rock Me
** Spazmatazz
** Speed
** Speed Racer
** Ugly (3 alternate versions)
?* Keep It
NOTE: I am assuming that most of the Mellon Collie tracks were
recorded at CRC, although it is just as possible that some tracks
could have been culled from the Pumpkinland session. Keep It is
rumored to be an unreleased song, or at least evolved into another
song.

March-August 1995 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
Believe
Said Sadly
The Boy

May 31, 1995 - Chicago Recording Company; Sequence Four
*T Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness
*T Tonight Tonight
*T Jellybelly
*T Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*T Fuck You
*T Muzzle
** Zero
** Here is no why
** To Forgive
** Love
** Cupid de Locke
** Galapogos
** Porcelina of the Vast Oceans
** Take Me Down
** Lily (my one and only)
NOTE: On this date, a rough mix of the Mellon Collie album was
created, dubbed Sequence Four. In other words, this tape was
basically what Mellon Collie sounded like as of May 31st. All songs
were rough takes and featured scratch vocals, if any; Galapogos even
featured a solo that was omitted from the final version.

August 1995 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood, Alan Moulder, & BC)
[all 28 Mellon Collie tracks mixed with overdubs]

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Marquis in Spades
Medellia of the Grey Skies (with The Frogs)
Mouths of Babes
Pennies
Sad Peter Pan (with Red Red Meat)
NOTE: I doubt that all these songs were recorded together at one
session, but is grouped together because they are all post-Mellon
Collie songs.

Fall 1995 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
NOTE: At this time, Billy complied the sound collage known as
Pasticio Medley. The track consists of 10-second snippets of about
70 unreleased "songs," with a total running time of 23 minutes.
While many of the songs were most likely instrumental jams, it is
equally as possible that a number of the songs were actual
compositions with lyrics and a song structure--a few of the tracks
had already been registered through BMI half a year earlier! The
snippets were compiled from a variety of sources recorded after
Siamese Dream and the completion of Mellon Collie. Pasticio Medley
features, in order of appearance:
The Demon, Thunderbolt, Dearth, Knuckles, Star Song, Fire Power,
New Waver, Space Jam, Zoom, So Very Sad About Us, Phang, Speed
Racer, The Eternal E, Hairy Eyeball, The Groover, Hell Bent For
Hell, Rachel, A Dog's Prayer, Blast, The Black Rider, Slurpee,
Flipper, The Viper, Bitch, Fried, Harmonio, USA, The Tracer,
Envelope Woman, Plastic Guy, Glasgow 3AM, The Road Is Long,
Funkified, Rigamorole, Depresso, The Streets Are Hot Tonight,
Dawn at 16, Spazmatazz, Fucker, In the Arms of Sheep, Speed, 77,
Me Rock You Snow, Feelium, Is Alex Milton, Ruberman, Spacer,
Rock Me, Weeping Willowly, Rings, So So Pretty, Lucky Lad, Jackboot,
Millieu, Disconnected, Let Your Lazer Love Light Shine Down, Phreak,
Porkbelly, Robot Lover, Jimmy James, America, Slinkeepie, Dummy Tum
Tummy, Fakir, Jake, Camaro, Moonkids, Make It Fungus, V-8, and Die.

Mar 1996 - Charing Cross Studios, Australia (BC/Martin White)
The Aeroplane Flies High
The Last Song
Transformer
NOTE: These tracks were recorded in Australia, while on tour.
Further overdubs were recorded later in Chicago. They were mixed,
along with Eye, at Chung King Studios by Neil Perry.

June 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Clones
Destination Unknown
Dreaming
My Blue Heaven
You're All I've Got Tonight
June 1996 - Bugg Studios, Chicago (James Iha and Kerry Brown)
A Night Like This
The Bells
June 1996 - Farmer Brown's Studio (D'Arcy's house) (Kerry Brown)
Dreaming (vocal tracks)
NOTE: This session is very conjectural; The time frame is an
estimate and I doubt that all of these songs were recorded
together.

July 1996 - Chicago studio [?]
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** To Sheila
?* [about 7 more songs]
NOTE: First session for Adore, held shortly after Jimmy's release.
The Pumpkins functioned as a trio during this session. With about
10 songs hastily recorded in a week, the session was scrapped as
the finished product seemed more like demos.

Summer 1996 - Soundworks, Chicago (Billy Corgan/Jeff Moleski)
Eye
** Tear
NOTE: Billy actually recorded two songs for the Lost Highway
Soundtrack. The second was an early version of Tear, which was
rejected.

September 1996 - Chung King, NY (Chris Shepard/Neil Perry & BC)
Lizards
Rats
Spiders
Squirrels with Tails
Worms
Worms (part 2)
NOTE: Recorded in about a week, this was just Billy Corgan and Matt
Walker recording riffs for the Ransom Soundtrack. Billy's scant
vocals were recorded on a mini tape dictaphone recorder.
These songs were curiously copyrighted as Parallel Stories.

December 1996 - The New Hit Factory, NY (Arif Mardin/Michael O'Riley)
Christmastime

Feb 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Billy Corgan/Chris Shepard)
Annie-Dog
Once In A While
The Ether's Tragic
The Guns of Love Disastrous
** Blissed and Gone
** Chewing Gum
** Do You Close Your Eyes
** For Martha (instrumental)
** My Mistake
** The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
** The End is The Beginning is the End
** The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
?* [about 20 other Adore demos]
?* [about 8 or 10 other Batman demos]
NOTE: The Pumpkins (with Matt Walker) supposedly recorded about 45
minutes worth of demos for the Batman soundtrack, so Guns of Love
and Ethers Tragic are probably from that tape. Roughly 30 demos for
the album Adore were also recorded at this time, so I'm sure both
the Adore and Batman demos where recorded at this session; the album
version of Annie-Dog was drawn from these sessions.

March 1997 - Chicago Recording Company (Nellee Hooper/Chris Shepard)
The Beginning is the End is the Beginning
The End is the Beginning is the End
NOTE: Recorded in Studio 5, which was demolished a few months later.

August-September 1997 - Streeterville Studios, Chicago
NOTE: This session was confirmed, but it is unknown what was
recorded and by whom. This could be part of the Wood sessions,
or somehow related to it. Does anyone have any more info?

Fall 1997 - Chicago Trax Recording and Hinge Chicago (Brad Wood)
Ava Adore
Behold! The Night Mare
Blank Page
Daphne Descends
Tear
To Sheila
NOTE: This session for Adore was originally scrapped, but was
latter used as the basic tracks for the album with overdubs and
such recorded later in California.

Nov-Mar 1998 - Sunset Sound, California (Billy Corgan/Neil Perry)
Appels + Oranjes
Blissed and Gone
Crestfallen
Czarina
For Martha
Once In A While
Once Upon A Time
Perfect
Pug
Shame
Summer
The Tale of Dusty and Pistol Pete
Waiting
17
** Cash Car Star
** Saturnine
?* [7 or 8 more songs]
NOTE: Although Adore was mostly recorded at Studio 2 at Sunset
Sound, many tracks were pieced together from other sessions at:
Battery Studios, Bugg Studios, Chicago Recording Company, Sadlands,
and Village Recorder. Waiting and Saturnine were merely unfinished
song fragments. There are conflicting reports to as how much
material was recorded; it has been suggested that there are
approximately 14 or 15 more finished songs from the Adore sessions,
but Neil Perry says that 40-odd songs or song fragments were
recorded.

March 1998 - Sound City, California (Rick Rubin/Sylvia Massey)
** Let Me Give The World To You
NOTE: The last song recorded for Adore, it was taken off the album
at the last second and remains unreleased. The finished version was
apparently a stripped down arrangement, which *******d: guitar,
bass, organ, and drums by Joey Waronker.

Late 1998 - Sadlands, Chicago
** If There Is A God
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 1)
** Wound (3/4 time)
** Le Deux Machina (keyboard version)
** Vanity
** Glass and the Ghost Children
** Autumn (instrumental)
** Drain
** Laugh
** Here I Am
** Lover
** Let Me Give The World To You
** Blue Skies Bring Tears (alt lyrics ver 2)
** Speed Kills
NOTE: Acoustic demos for the Machina album, recorded at Billy's
home. The tape *******s two lyrically different versions of Blue
Skies Bring Tears, one containing the lyrics from the arrangement of
the song performed during The Arising! Tour in April 1999. Lover is
the song bootlegged as Don't Wanna Be Your Lover or One Less Moment.

Nov 1998-Sept 1999 - Pumpkinland, Chicago (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Blue Skies Bring Tears
Glass and the Ghost Children
Heavy Metal Machine
I of the Mourning
Raindrops + Sunshowers
Speed Kills
Stand Inside Your Love
The Everlasting Gaze
The Imploding Voice
The Crying Tree of Mercury
The Sacred and Profane
This Time
Try, Try, Try
With Every Light
Wound
*T Dross
*T Glass Theme
*T Here's To The Atom Bomb
*T If There Is A God
*T Real Love
** Cash Car Star
** Go
** Home
** Let Me Give The World To You
?* Bringing The Weather
?* Death Boogie
?* In My Body
?* Jam 13
?* Saturnine
NOTE: Machina was haphazardly recorded at Pumpkinland over a span of
ten months. Many alternate versions exist of the songs, as the band
consistently toyed with their arrangement. The songs on the final
album often consisted of combinations of a few different
arrangements of each song. In other words, the Machina tracks
continually evolved throughout the year, and the tape was rolling
during their transformation.
Radio was an early incarnation of I of the Mourning, just as Slow
Songs was of Crying Tree of Mercury and Disco King was of The
Everlasting Gaze. The second movement of Glass and the Ghost
Children is actually a bit of the six-minute Le Deux Machina (which
multiple versions exist of). Go is apparently a James song that was
left off the album.
A tape called "Friends and Enemies of Modern Music" has surfaced,
most likely compiled early on during the sessions. The tape
*******d early mixes and recordings of several Machina tracks (most
with live-band arrangements) as well as soundboard recordings of
Money (That's What I Want) and XYU from the 10/31/98 show. The tape
also *******d an alternate Heavy Metal Machine with both different
lyrics and a different main riff, and an arrangement of Blue Skies
Bring Tears much like The Arising! version.

Oct 1999 - The Village Recorder, LA (Flood & BC/Howard Willing)
Age of Innocence
NOTE: Recorded at that last second, and tagged onto the album,
possibly as sort of an afterthought. D'Arcy most likely did not
play bass on the song.


July 2000 - Chicago Recording Company
*? Lucky 13
*? White Spiders
NOTE: Sessions for the final Smashing Pumpkins album. The band is
said to be working on unfinished tracks from the Machina Sessions.


================================================== ======================

Television and Radio Performances

The Smashing Pumpkins, like many other bands, have performed nation and
worldwide on various media formats. The following is a chronology of
the band's television and radio performances, along with any concert
performances that have been officially released.


Nov 16, 1988 - WNUR Radio, Evanston, Illinois
** My Eternity
** Venus In Furs
NOTE: It was noted that Jimmy had recently joined the band. It has
been unconfirmed if more tracks were performed or not.

Mar 16, 1989 - WZRD Radio, Chicago, Illinois
*T Cinnamon Girl
*T East
*T My Eternity
*T Nothing and Everything
*T Rhinoceros
*T Snap (If I Could)
*T Spiteface
*T Sun
*T There It Goes
*T Under Your Spell
*T Venus In Furs
NOTE: A live performance upon the release of the Light Into Dark
compilation. This was possibly one of the first performances of
Rhinoceros.

June 23, 1991 - Rose Records, Chicago (Mike Rubano)
Terrapin
*T Blue
*T Bury Me
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Smiley
*T Suffer

Sept 8, 1991 - Maida Vaile Studios, London (Dale Griffin)
Girl Named Sandoz
Siva
Smiley
NOTE: The slightly infamous John Peel Sessions.

Jan 15, 1992 - VPRO Radio session, Hilversum, Holland
*T Crush
*T Siva
*T Silverfuck
*T Snail

1992 - Nippon Television, Japan
Slunk (live Vieuphoria version)

September 1992 - BBC Late Show, London
*C Rhinoceros

June 22, 1993 - MTV Most Wanted, London; live acoustic performance
Cherub Rock (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
** Disarm

June 23, 1993 - Studio 10S, Paris, France; live acoustic performance
*C Cherub Rock
*C Dancing in the Moonlight
*C Disarm
*T Drown
*T Hummer
*T Kooks
*T Luna
*C Rhinoceros
*C Rocket
*C Siva
*C Spaceboy
*C Suffer
*C Today

June 30, 1993 - VPRO Radio for Villa '65, Netherlands (Hans Bunt)
Dancing in the Moonlight
Spaceboy (live NME version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Rocket
*T Today

July 26, 1993 - Tower Records, Chicago; live acoustic performance
Rocket (acoustic ONXRT version)
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Mayonaise
*T Siva
*C Today

July 30, 1993 - Naked City, UK TV; live acoustic performance
Mayonaise (acoustic Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Exact recording date unknown, although it was originally
broadcasted on July 30, 1993.

September 3, 1993 - Alabamhalle, Germany; live performance
Geek USA (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Telepool Productions. Although recorded on
September 3, 1993, it was originally broadcasted on Feb. 21, 1994.
Also performed: Cherub Rock, Disarm, Rocket, Quiet, Today, Drown,
Hummer, Soma, Siva, Silverfuck.

September 1993 - The Word, BBC Studios, London; live performance
Disarm (live Vieuphoria version)
*C Sunshine of Your Love
NOTE: Recorded by Planet 24, Channel 4 London. Although recorded in
September of 1993, it was broadcasted on February 18, 1994.

September 1993 - Sala Apollo, Barcelona; live performance
I Am One (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Sputnik de Televisio de Catalunya. Originally
broadcasted on March 4, 1994. Also performed: Rocket, Quiet, Today,
Disarm, Soma, Cherub Rock, and Silverfuck.

September 12, 1993 - BBC Radio One Studios, London (Ted de Bono)
Landslide
Never Let Me Down
** Disarm

October 1993 - MTV No Alternative session; live performance
Glynis (live No Alternative version)
Today (live No Alternative version)
*T Cherub Rock
*T Disarm
*T Geek USA
*T I Am One

October 28, 1993 - NBC Studio 8-H, New York; SNL rehearsals
*C Cherub Rock (2 takes)
*C Today (2 takes)

October 30, 1993 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Cherub Rock
*C Today

November 10, 1993 - Atlanta, Georgia; live performance
Quiet (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Modi for Modivational Films and produced by
Merril Ward. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

December 10, 1993 - Aragon Ballroom, Chicago; live performance
Today (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Recorded by Jam Productions. Live audio remix by Butch Vig
at Smart Studios. Also performed: Geek USA, Quiet, Disarm, Siva,
Drown, Hummer, Cherub Rock, Rocket, Soma, I Am One, Spaceboy, Bury
Me, and Silverfuck.

December 12, 1993 - Universal, Los Angeles; live acoustic performance
Rudolph the Rednosed Reindeer
*C Cherub Rock
*C Disarm
*C Hummer
*C Rocket
*C Spaceboy
*C Today

February 24, 1994 - Astoria Theatre, London; live performance
Silverfuck (live Vieuphoria version)
Soma (live Vieuphoria version)
NOTE: Directed by Bret Turnbull and produced by Sarah Bayliss for
Medialab. Live audio remix by Butch Vig at Smart Studios.

September 8, 1994 - MTV Music Awards, New York; live performance
*T Disarm

October 23, 1995 - Riviera Theatre, Chicago; live performance
Bullet with Butterfly Wings (live Launch CD ROM version)
Disarm (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Today (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Tonight, Tonight (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
Zero (live Chicago 1995 promo version)
NOTE: A live show recorded and broadcasted live on FM radio. 5
tracks were systematically released on promo and multimedia discs.
Also performed: Jellybelly, Fuck You, Thru the Eyes of Ruby, Geek
USA, Porcelina of the Vast Oceans, Cherub Rock, Mayonaise, XYU,
Baby Loves to Rock, If You Want My Love and Auf Weidersehen.

Nov 11, 1995 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studio 8-H, New York; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Zero

December 1995 - The White Room, Westwood Studios, UK TV; live
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

December 10, 1995 - Canal+, French TV, France; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

January 29, 1996 - American Music Awards, Shrine Auditorium, LA; live
*C 1979

March 13, 1996 - Triple J Studios, Sydney, Australia; live acoustic
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings
*C Cupid de Locke
*C Muzzle
*C Take Me Down
*C Thirty-Three
*C To Forgive
*C Tonight, Tonight
*C 1979

Sept 4, 1996 - MTV Music Video Awards, Radio City Music Hall, NY; live
*C Tonight, Tonight

November 14, 1996 - MTV Europe Music Video Awards; live performance
*C Bullet with Butterfly Wings

February 25, 1997 - NBC Studios, NY; live performance
*C Muzzle

Feb 26, 1997 - Academy Awards, Madison Square Garden, NY; live
1979 (live Grammy Nominees version)

May 12, 1998 - Late with Jools Holland, BBC Studios, London; live
*T Ava Adore
*T Daphne Descends
*T Once Upon A Time

May 20, 1998 - RTVE Studios, Madrid, Spain
** Ava Adore
** Daphne Descends
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Tear
** To Sheila

July 9, 1998 - Q101 Studios, Chicago
** Perfect

July 19, 1998 - Much Music Studios, Toronto, Canada
** Ava Adore
** Bullet with Butterfly Wings
** For Martha
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect
** Pug
** Shame
** To Sheila
** Transmission
** 1979

July 30, 1998 - Late Show with David Letterman, 53rd Street, New York
** Ava Adore
** Crestfallen
** Perfect
** Pug
** To Sheila
** 1979

August 3, 1998 - Howard Stern Show, New York
** Perfect

August 4, 1998 - Live with Regis and Kathy Lee, New York
** Once Upon A Time
** Perfect

May-Sept 1998 - Adore Tour, various locations around the globe
NOTE: Almost all of the dates on the Adore Tour were professionally
taped by the band and sometimes by the local media. The film was to
be used for a full-length documentary on the Adore Tour, directed by
Jesse Ignjatovic. This film was never finished and will most likely
never be released, due to conflicts in the editing process.

September 26, 1998 - Saturday Night Live, NBC Studios, New York; live
** Perfect

October 25, 1998 - VH1 Fashion Awards, New York; live performance
** Crestfallen

Jan 17, 2000 - Canal+, Nulle Part Ailleurs, France
** The Everlasting Gaze

Jan 30, 2000 - ABC Studios, Los Angles, Politically Incorrect
** The Everlasting Gaze
** Stand Inside Your Love

Mar 9, 2000 - MTV Studios, Total Request Live, New York
** The Everlasting Gaze
** I of the Mourning
** XYU (jam)

April 26, 2000 - Ed Sullivan Theatre, NY, Late Night w/ Dave Letterman
** I of the Mourning


================================================== ======================

Appendix A: Unreleased Live Recordings

Appendix A consists of a list of unreleased song titles that have been
performed live. Some title have already been noted in the General
Recording Chronology; thus, the song was performed live but the studio
version was not released. The remaining titles were performed live and
were either not officially recorded in a studio or otherwise, or the
recording information is unavailable.
The entries ******* a selected date and location the song was
performed. The provided date may not necessarily be the only
performance date, but is only the most available, of best soundquality,
or most definitive in the context of bootlegs and concert tapes.
Appendix A only *******s Smashing Pumpkins originals, or songs only
written by Billy Corgan, James Iha, or Billy Corgan and James Iha (as
many of the earlier songs were). Covers and improvisational jams are
not *******d.


The Vigil Chicago 8/10/88
Armed To The Teeth " "
I Fall " "
6234 " "
Holiday " "
Screaming " "
There It Goes Chicago 10/5/88
My Eternity " "
Under Your Spell " "
She " "
Bleed " "
Oiu Henri Chicago 11/23/88
Alabaster Chicago 4/30/89
Salt Chicago 10/31/89
Lie I Lie ??/??/89
365 ??/??/90
I'll Never Change ??/??/90
Morning Jam ??/??/90
Opal Worship ??/??/90
Razor Madison 6/16/90
Try To Try Madison 6/16/90
Over You Cincinnati 9/13/90
Jesus Loves His Babies Chicago 6/22/91
I Am My End Seattle 8/20/91
What You Wanted Seattle 8/20/91
Offer Up Paris 2/5/92
Chump ??/??/92
Towers of Rabble Chicago 2/21/95
Speed Chicago 2/21/95
Space Jam Vancouver 1/8/97
Let Me Give The World To You Hamburg 5/14/98
Cash Car Star Los Angeles 10/31/98
Lover Los Angeles 12/12/98
If There Is A God Los Angeles 12/12/98
Dross Detroit 4/10/99
Glass Theme " "
Home " "
Pale Scales (instrumental) Chicago 12/20/99


================================================== ======================

Appendix B: Unsolved Mysteries and Otherwise

Appendix B consists of selected commentary concerning a few of the more
"puzzling" aspects of The Smashing Pumpkins music. As with any band
with a breathtaking amount of output, there is sure to be a number of
debates and controversies over unknown song titles, the identity of
various demos, etc.
If you have any contributions to Appendix B, don't be afraid to send
them to me. They will be *******d and your credit will be given.


- IS STP REALLY SET THE RAY TO JERRY?

I have heard rumors that STP is an early version of Set The Ray To
Jerry. I find this hard to believe, as I'm sure someone incorrectly
thought STP was the abbreviation for Set The Ray For Jerry (wouldn't
it be STRTJ or SRJ?). Does anyone have any other substantial info?


- OFFER UP (LONG) IS ACTUALLY JELLYBELLY

The title for the song formerly and incorrectly known as Offer Up
(Long) has been discovered! The song is actually an extremely early
version of Jellybelly (which was what the song was called in '92),
that often had lyrics from Offer Up tagged at the end of it.
For those who are wondering, the old Jellybelly's riff's were
inverted and the song evolved twice over the coursed of the three
years, until it's eventual release on Mellon Collie.


- ZOOM IS REALLY SPACE JAM

Dave Mead convinced me that the song we all know and love as Zoom is
not called Zoom at all, but Space Jam. It seems that an error was
made when calculating the time on the Pasticio Medley. He also says
the title Space Jam was confirmed by a source close to the band.


================================================== ======================

Online References

Eric Agnew, Smashing Pumpkins Fan Collaborative
Steve Hemming, Smashing Pumpkins Collection
David Mead, Faded Photographs
Josh Provost, Smashing Pumpkins Live Recording Association

Reel Time Studios - http://www.reeltimestudios.com
BMI Music Publishing - http://www.bmi.com

Dave Asselin, Smashing Pumpkins Text Based Discography
Karl Daher, Smashing Pumpkins Compact Disc Bootlist
Mike Hamilton and Vince Horst, Smashing Pumpkins FAQ
Jesse Miller, The Mashed Potatoes FAQ


================================================== ======================

Jesse Miller

The Smashing Pumpkins Recording Sessions
http://www.tcinternet.net/users/butlers/sessions.html

Now featured at SPFC.org!!!
http://www.spfc.org/band/studio.html

Mirrored at:
http://www.netphoria.org/recording/recording.html
http://wound.hypermart.com/sprecordings.txt
http://www.smashing-pumpkins.net/recording/index.html
http://blamo.org/sp/sessions.txt


EOF
Hardcore.

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 01:02 PM   #37
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Hardcore punk
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Hardcore punk
Stylistic origins: Punk rock
Cultural origins: Early 1980s North America
Typical instruments: Vocals - Guitar - Bass - Drums
Mainstream popularity: Low to Mid
Derivative forms: Alternative rock - Grunge - Emo - Post-hardcore
Subgenres
Christian hardcore - Crust punk - D-beat - Grindcore - Melodic hardcore - Powerviolence - Skate punk - Thrashcore - Youth crew
Fusion genres
Crossover thrash - Funkcore - Metalcore
Regional scenes
Australia - Brazil - Canada - Europe: Italy - South Wales - Scandinavia: Umeå - Japan - USA: Boston - California - Chicago - Detroit - Minneapolis - New Jersey - New York - North Carolina - Philadelphia - Phoenix - DC
Other topics
Hardcore dancing - Straight edge - DIY punk ethic - List of bands

Hardcore punk is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United States in the late 1970s. It emerged as many of the first-wave punk bands disbanded or moved onto different genres, and as many of the newer punk musicians focused on music with faster tempos, louder volume and harder bass levels.[1] The hardcore punk sound is generally thicker, heavier, and faster than 1970s-style punk rock, and it is sometimes characterized by short, loud, and passionate songs about serious topics such as government, capitalism, war and the punk subculture itself. The full phrase hardcore punk usually refers to a music style from the early 1980s (and music by current bands of similar style) that has more in common with punk rock than it does with a more recent style that referred to as simply hardcore; which has more in common with metal than punk.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Origins
* 2 The big three
* 3 Other early notable bands
* 4 Early support
* 5 Negative publicity
* 6 Slam dancing
* 7 Influence
* 8 Early history in Europe
* 9 Hardcore in the 1990s
o 9.1 Metalcore
o 9.2 Progression and experimentation
* 10 Hardcore in the 2000s
* 11 Hardcore punk record labels
* 12 See also
* 13 Notes
* 14 References
* 15 External links

[edit] Origins

The music genre that became known as hardcore punk originated in different areas of North America in late 1980 and early 1981. Some of the major areas in North America associated with the origins of hardcore punk *******: California, Washington, DC, Chicago, New York City, Vancouver and Boston. At the same time, a British equivalent had emerged, although it would not be known as UK 82 or British hardcore until later. The origin of the term hardcore punk is uncertain, however one theory is that the Vancouver-based band D.O.A. made the term official with the title of their 1981 album, Hardcore '81.[2][3][4] Until about 1983, the term hardcore was used fairly sparingly, and mainly as a descriptive term. (i.e., a band would be called a "hardcore band" and a concert would be a "hardcore show"). American teenagers who were fans of hardcore punk simply considered themselves fans of punk — although they were not necessarily interested in the original punk rock sound of late 1970s (i.e. the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers). In many circles, hardcore was an in-group term, meaning 'music by people like us,' and it *******d a wide range of sounds, from hyper-speed punk rock to sludgy dirge-rock, and often including arty experimental bands, such as The Stickmen and Flipper.

Hardcore was noted for its do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. In most cities (California being the exception) the hardcore scene relied entirely on DIY recordings, zines, radio shows and concerts due to many bands having little to no access to any means of production. Hardcore punk fans brought a dressed-down T-shirt, jeans, and crewcut style to punk fashion. This contrasted with the more elaborate and provocative clothing styles of many 1970s punk rockers, such as Richard Hell, Sid Vicious and Soo Catwoman.

[edit] The big three
Black Flag, June 1985
Black Flag, June 1985

Michael Azerrad's Our Band Could Be Your Life traces hardcore back to three bands: Black Flag, Bad Brains and Minor Threat. He calls Black Flag, formed in Los Angeles in 1976, the music’s "godfathers." Azerrad credits Bad Brains, formed in Washington, D.C. in 1977, with introducing "light speed" tempos. He calls Minor Threat, formed in Washington, D.C. in 1980, the "definitive" hardcore punk band. Minor Threat, also from Washington, DC, formed out of the short-lived Teen Idles. Carry-over members of The Teen Idles were Ian MacKaye (who went on to co-found post-hardcore group Fugazi and Embrace) and Jeff Nelson. Minor Threat played an aggressive, fast, hardcore punk style influenced by Bad Brains. The band was responsible for inspiring the straight edge movement, with their song of the same name. After the Teen Idles broke up, MacKaye and Nelson put the band's concert money toward founding Dischord Records, initially to release their Minor Disturbance EP on vinyl. The record label went on to release EPs by Minor Threat and many other early Washington, DC hardcore bands.

Black Flag had a major impact on the Los Angeles scene—and later the wider North American scene—with their raw, confrontational sound and DIY ethical stance. The original lineup featured Keith Morris (later of the Circle Jerks), and the final lineup featured former State of Alert singer Henry Rollins, who first sang with Black Flag at a concert in New York City on June 27, 1981.[5] While their musical influence was limited (few contemporary bands sounded similar to Black Flag), their tireless work[citation needed] in promoting their own concerts and releasing self-financed records inspired other bands to do the same. Tours in 1980 and 1981 brought Black Flag in contact with developing hardcore scenes in many parts of North America.

Bad Brains are an African-American band that formed in Washington, DC. The band members had backgrounds in soul music, funk, and jazz, and were influenced by rock bands such as Black Sabbath and the Sex Pistols. The single "Pay to Cum" b/w "Stay Close to Me" was released in 1980. Their first album (originally a 1981 cassette-only release from Reachout International Records) *******d three reggae songs, in sharp contrast to the rest of their music, which mainly consisted of fast, loud, hardcore punk.

[edit] Other early notable bands
Music samples:

* "Pay to Cum" (file info) — [Play media] play in browser (beta)
o Sample of "Pay to Cum" by the Bad Brains from Pay to Cum single (1980)
o Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Several 1970s bands from southern California released records featuring music that sounds very similar to what later became known as hardcore. One of those records is the Middle Class’ 1978 Out of Vogue EP.[6] It is unclear the extent to which this early record (and the inclusion of the band's music on the 1979 compilation LP Tooth & Nail) directly inspired hardcore. Mentions of them in contemporary publications are sparse, and little notice appears to have been taken of them outside the Los Angeles area. A more influential record was The Germs’ 1979 LP (GI); essentially a hardcore record, not only for its quick tempos but also for its fast chord changes. Also from Orange County, T.S.O.L (formed in 1978) made a name for themselves in the hardcore punk scene with a melodic yet aggressive pop punk sound.

San Francisco's Dead Kennedys formed in 1978 and released their first single "California Über Alles" in 1979. By the time they released the In God We Trust, Inc. EP in 1981, Dead Kennedys were playing very fast tempos. Circle Jerks’ first album (recorded in late 1979, released 1980) features several songs with very fast chord changes and tempos. The Misfits (of New Jersey) were a 1977-style punk band involved in New York’s Max's Kansas City scene. Their horror film aesthetic was popular among early hardcore fans. In 1981, the Misfits integrated high-speed thrash songs into their set. Hüsker Dü was formed in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1979 as a post-punk/new wave band, but soon became a loud and fast hard punk band. Hüsker Dü released the 1982 live album Land Speed Record, which has been called a "breakneck force like no other... Not for the faint of heart."[7] By 1985, the band morphed into one of the seminal alternative rock bands.

By 1981, many more hardcore punk bands began to perform and release demos and records, including the Neos of Victoria, British Columbia; Negative Approach of Detroit; The Meatmen of Lansing, Michigan; The Necros of Maumee, Ohio; The Effigies of Chicago; SS Decontrol, DYS, Negative FX, Jerry's Kids, and Gang Green of Boston; Zeroption of Toronto; the Big Boys, MDC and The Dicks of Austin, Texas; and Sadistic Exploits of Philadelphia. The Beastie Boys, more widely known for their later hip hop music, were one of the first published hardcore bands in New York City.

Negative FX, perhaps the most popular hardcore band in Boston around early 1982, did not appear on record while they were together. They were largely unknown outside their own area until a posthumous album was released in 1984. Notable early hardcore punk records ******* The Angry Samoans’ first LP, the Big Boys/The Dicks Live at Raul's Club split LP, the Boston-area compilation This Is Boston, Not L.A., Minor Threat's 7" EPs, JFA's Blatant Localism EP, the New York-area compilations New York Thrash and The Big Apple Rotten To The Core, Negative Approach's eponymous EP and the DC-area compilation record Flex Your Head.

[edit] Early support

An influential radio show in the Los Angeles area was Rodney on the ROQ, on the commercial station KROQ. DJ Rodney Bingenheimer played many styles of music, and helped popularize what was, circa 1979–80, called Beach Punk — a rowdy suburban style played by mostly teenage bands in and around Huntington Beach, and in heavily conservative Orange County. He would come under attack from the thriving late 70's punk band the Angry Samoans. Early support in New York City & New Jersey came from Pat Duncan who hosted live punk and hardcore bands weekly on WFMU since 1979.[8] and Tim Sommer who hosted "Noise The Show" on WNYU.[9] In 1982-1983, MTV put the hardcore band Kraut on mild rotation.[10]

College radio was, however, the main outlet for hardcore punk in most of North America. The San Francisco-area public radio station KPFA featured the Maximum RocknRoll radio show with DJs Tim Yohannon and Jeff Bale, who played the younger Northern California bands. A wave of zines helped spread the new punk style, such as Flipside. In late 1981, Yohannon and Bale’s Maximum RocknRoll zine, modeled on Tim Tonooka's Ripper, had a national circulation and featured scene reports from around the country. A strong infrastructure of independent labels, linked with radio outlets and 'zines helped to create a nationwide subculture.

[edit] Negative publicity

Concerts in the early hardcore scene increasingly became sites of violent battles between police and concertgoers; especially in Los Angeles. Many concert venues were trashed on both coasts of the United States, despite frantic pleas from 'zine writers. Henry Rollins argued that in his experience, the police caused far more problems than they solved at hardcore performances. Reputed violence at hardcore concerts was featured in episodes of the popular television shows CHiPs and Quincy, M.E., in which Los Angeles hardcore punks were depicted as being involved in murder and mayhem.[11] Contemporary 'zine writers claimed that these media portrayals attracted new, violent people to the concerts, acting at least partially as a cause of the problem.

[edit] Slam dancing

Main articles: Mosh and Hardcore dancing

The hardcore punk scene of the early 80's gave rise to slam dancing and stage diving.[citation needed] The music was perfectly suited for it as were the venues, with their small atmosphere and easy accessible stages. Mosh was a term used in reggae and ska style music.In the later half of the 80s the thrash metal scene would imitate this form of dancing, with Anthrax popularizing the term "mosh" with the metal scene.[citation needed] Moshing also started being seen at harder college rock shows. In modern times the term "hardcore dancing" describes a style of dance which imitates fighting the air on the spot.[citation needed]

[edit] Influence

Hardcore had a huge influence on other forms of rock music in North America. The San-Francisco-based thrash metal band Metallica were among the first crossover artists, incorporating the compositional structure and technical proficiency of metal with the speed and aggression of hardcore. The new style became known as thrash metal, and later speed metal. Other early bands in this genre ******* Megadeth and Anthrax. Slayer are also well known for their hardcore punk roots, and have released an album formed entirely of hardcore covers called Undisputed Attitude.

The rising influence of heavy metal in the hardcore scene (circa 1984-1985) dismayed some hardcore punks, who felt that hardcore musicians who crossed over to metal styles were embracing a musical style that hardcore punk had originally rejected. However, some musicians in the first wave of hardcore, such as members of Bad Brains and Black Flag, had been influenced by heavy metal acts such as Black Sabbath. Longtime hardcore punks, who remembered fighting with hostile metalheads only a fews years earlier, now felt that those same people were attempting to co-opt hardcore. These die-hard hardcore punks argued that the new long-haired interpreters of hardcore were merely mimicking emotions such as raw anger, that they did not truly feel.

A 1986 concert by the UK band Discharge in New York City generated brief international notoriety when a crowd of roughly 1,500 paid $10 admission and pelted the band with garbage, an apparent response to the band's turn to a more metallic sound.

In 1985, New York's Stormtroopers of Death, an Anthrax side project, released the album Speak English or Die. Though it bore similarities to thrash metal, such as a characteristic bass-heavy guitar and fast tempos and chord changes, the album was distinguished from thrash metal by its lack of guitar solos and heavy use of crunchy chord breakdowns (a New York hardcore technique) known as "mosh parts". Other bands, such as Suicidal Tendencies and DRI, switched from hardcore to a similar metallic style, which came to be known as crossover.

Many hardcore bands began experimenting with other styles, moods and concerns as their careers progressed in the 1980s, becoming known as alternative rock. Bands such as Minutemen, Hüsker Dü, and The Replacements drew from hardcore but broke even further away from its "loud-fast" formula; critic Joe S. Harrington suggests the latter two "paraded as Hardcore until it was deemed permissible to do otherwise".[12] These bands diversified the genre's sound in ways that would be a major influence on later alternative rock bands.[13] Grunge music was especially heavily influenced by hardcore. In the mid-1980s, Washington State bands such as The Melvins and Green River developed a sludgy, "aggressive sound that melded the slower tempos of heavy metal with the intensity of hardcore."[14] The sense of liberation that many of the grunge bands got — that you don't have to be the greatest musicians to form a band — was at least as important as the music. Even though the early grunge sound was more influenced by Black Sabbath and Black Flag's My War album than hardcore punk rock, bands like Mudhoney and Nirvana instilled a traditional hardcore influence as well as take the sound into more conventional pop-oriented territory. Kurt Cobain once described Nirvana's sound as "The Knack and The Bay City Rollers being molested by Black Flag and Black Sabbath." The popularity of grunge resulted in renewed interest in American hardcore in the '90s.

The hardcore punk scene had an influence that spread far beyond music. The straight edge philosophy was rooted in a faction of hardcore particularly popular on the east coast of the United States. Hardcore also put a great emphasis on the DIY punk ethic, with many bands making their own records, flyers, and other items, and booking their own tours through an informal network of like-minded people. Radical environmentalism and veganism found popular expressions in the hardcore scene.

More recently, hardcore punk has given life to new styles of pop punk. Some contemporary pop punk bands (often containing members of former hardcore bands such as New Found Glory's Chad of Shai Hulud fame) have created a new blend of the style by mixing hardcore influences. A phenomenon referred to as the "pop punk breakdown" has become increasingly popular, in which bands play hardcore style breakdowns with more melodic chords.

[edit] Early history in Europe

The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden, and Germany have had notably active hardcore scenes. However, in the United Kingdom, UK82 (also known as UK Hardcore) bands such as The Exploited, Charged GBH, Discharge, and The Anti-Nowhere League occupied the cultural space that American-style hardcore did elsewhere. These UK bands at times showed a musical similarity to American hardcore, often including quick tempos and chord changes, and they generally had similar political and social sensibilities. However, they represented a case of parallel evolution, having been musically inspired by earlier London Oi! bands such as Sham 69, and the proto-speed metal band Motörhead.

Discharge played a huge role in influencing the early Swedish hardcore bands, such as Anti Cimex. Many hardcore bands from that region still have a strong Discharge and Motörhead influence. The band Entombed is also cited as a strong influence on Swedish hardcore bands from the early 1990s onward.

In much the same way, anarcho-punk bands such as Crass, Icons of Filth, Flux Of Pink Indians and Rudimentary Peni had little in common with American hardcore other than an uncompromising political philosophy and an abrasive aesthetic. Many American hardcore punks listened to British punk bands, but others upheld a strict regionalism, deriding the UK bands as rock stars, and their fans as poseurs. Expressive fans of Crass were called Crassholes.

American hardcore bands that visited the UK (such as Black Flag and U.S.CHAOS in 1981-1982) encountered equally ambivalent attitudes. European hardcore bands suffered no such prejudice in the U.S.; Italian bands Raw Power and Negazione, and the Dutch BGK, enjoyed widespread popularity.

In the more underground part of the UK punk scene, a new hardcore sound and scene developed, inspired by continental European, Scandinavian, Japanese and American bands. It was started by bands like Asylum and Plasmid, and their sound — only heard at live concerts and on demo tapes and compilations in the mid 1980s — evolved into bands such as Heresy, Ripcord, Napalm Death, Hellbastard, Doom, The Stupids, Concrete Sox, Jailcell Recipes, Visions of Change and Extreme Noise Terror.

Some of the most important influences among late-1980s UK bands *******d the Japanese band GISM; Boston band Siege, Idaho band Septic Death, and Swedish band Anti Cimex; as well as more metallic bands such as Celtic Frost and Metallica. However, by the late 1980s, UK bands were becoming far more influenced by American bands such as the Dead Kennedys (who were always very popular in the UK), Black Flag and many of the early Washington, D.C., New York, Boston and West Coast hardcore bands such as Minor Threat, DYS, Slapshot and 7 Seconds. Straight edge began to make its presence felt in the UK, with the emergence of small straight edge communities in most major cities in the UK, and straight edge bands forming in Durham and London.

There were many 1980s bands that could be described as sounding like something in between the styles of the dominating UK and US bands. While the bands that had the most significant influence were parallel-evolved bands such as Discharge and Charged GBH, others, such as The Stupids (a UK band influenced by US hardcore) gained brief but widespread college-radio airplay in the US.

Some notable bands from that era in Europe were Crise Total (Portugal), Negazione, Indigesti, Wretched, Raw Power, Declino,(Italy), H.H.H., MG-15, Eskorbuto (Spain), Inferno, Vorkriegsjugend, Scapegoats (Germany), U.B.R. (Former Yugoslavia), Kafka Process, Barn Av Regnbuen (Norway), Heimat-Los (France), Lärm, BGK, Funeral Oration (Netherlands), Vi, Enola Gay, O.H.M. (Denmark), Dezerter, Armia, Moskwa, Siekiera (Poland), Kaaos, Rattus, Rutto, Kansan Uutiset, Terveet Kädet, Appendix (Finland), Headcleaners, Asocial, Missbrukarna, Sound Of Disaster and Anti-Cimex (Sweden).

Examples of bands that continued to play that style of hardcore in the 1990s *******: Seein Red, Uutuus, Kirous, Health Hazard, Slapshot, Voorhees, Totalitär, Los Crudos, Sin Dios, and Detestation. After fall of the Iron Curtain in eastern Europe, many harcore bands were created or became more publicly known (after hiding in garages and being known by small circles of underground fans). Examples of such bands ******* Brachyblast, Radegast or Sarcastic front from Czech Republic. Hardcore also become popular in Asia in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with bands such as Disaster Funhouse, Chronic Mass, Noisemonger and Cramp Mind from Malaysia; 4-Sides and Stomping Ground from Singapore; Agony of Destruction, Death from Above, Mutual Assured Destruction and Biofeedback from the Philippines; and Disclose and Death Side from Japan.

[edit] Hardcore in the 1990s

In the 1980s, hardcore was strictly a style of North American punk rock. By the end of the 1980s and into the 1990s, hardcore became much more diverse, branching off mainly into two sounds: one traditionally punk-based, the other punk based with a greater metal influence. The punk-focussed sound retains much of the style and feel of the original hardcore bands, while the heavier metal influenced sound, tends to be more technical. Nearly all fans of traditional hardcore do not consider metalcore to be a form of hardcore punk or even a genre altogether.

[edit] Metalcore

Main article: Metalcore

? This section may contain original research or unverified claims.
Please help Wikipedia by adding references. See the talk page for details.
This article has been tagged since June 2007.

The neutrality of this article or section is disputed.
Please see the discussion on the talk page.
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Being a chiefly urban phenomenon, hardcore often reflected the life of its players and fans. The incorporation of heavy metal (both musically and mentality-wise) led to a sect of hardcore bands branching off into heavier directions. Notable bands who developed the genre in early years ******* Biohazard, Edgewise, and DC's Damnation A.D.. Today, some of the most well-known representatives of the metalcore genre are Norma Jean, The Birds Of Paradise, Converge, Between the buried and me, As I Lay Dying, Throwdown, Underoath, and Killswitch Engage.

The sound is an amalgamation of deep, hoarse vocals (though rarely as deep or guttural as death metal), downtuned guitars, thrashy drum rhythms inspired by earlier hardcore bands, and slow, staccato low-end musical breaks, known as breakdowns. Thrash metal and hip hop elements are also common.

Some of the bands that helped pioneer the mixture of hardcore with death metal in the 1990s were Brooklyn, NY's Merauder and Confusion; Jackson Heights, NY's Dmize. They have been described as a cross between bands like Kreator and Obituary with New York hardcore. Darkside NYC, formed by Alan Blake of Sheer Terror was often described as Celtic Frost meets Sheer Terror musically, and Negative Approach meets Crumbsuckers vocally. They were known for incorporating blastbeats, which was a direct death metal/grindcore influence.

Dmize, Confusion, and Darkside NYC managed to achieve cult status in the U.S., Europe, and Japan while only playing shows in the Northeast US during their short existences. Merauder signed with Century Media and toured the world, still performing today. In upstate NY, All Out War, formed with ex-Merauder members, gained an extremely violent reputation because their audience members would pummel each other. Many concerts ended in a full scale riot.[citation needed] As a result, many clubs were loathe to have these kinds of bands perform. Just as Merauder, DMIZE, Confusion, and Darkside NYC would loathe being called metalcore as they are actually hardcore and do not recognize metalcore as a subgenre of hardcore but as just plain metal or screamo metal.

This particular scene is known for its stereotypical image and attitude of tight jeans, mop-headed haircuts, painted fingernails, eyeliner, etc.

[edit] Progression and experimentation

In the late 1980s, bands such as NoMeansNo and Victim's Family created a new style of music by blending aggressive elements from hardcore with influences from genres such as psychedelic rock, progressive rock, noise, jazz, or math rock (a development sometimes termed jazzcore). This path was followed in the early 1990s by Mr Bungle, Candiria, Deep Turtle and Ruins. The noisecore played by Melt-Banana may have been a separate evolution. Other notable hardcore-influenced bands in this genre ******* the avant-garde Naked City (formed by saxophonist John Zorn) and Neurosis, which started as a hardcore band before exploring slower tempos and dark ambiance. Many bands started to incorporate emotional and personal aspects into their music; influenced by the sounds coming out of Washington, D.C. and Dischord Records, which by the late 1990s had evolved into emo music. Nation of Ulysses was one of the most influential bands to come out of D.C.; combining dissonant guitars similar to those of Black Flag, elements of jazz, and a seemingly absurdist (or situationist) political ideology. Their sound and fashion sense influenced the San Diego (or 'Chula Vista') hardcore scene.

Ebullition Records, founded in 1990 by Kent McClard in Santa Barbara, California, often releasing bands that criticized the American political and economic system; giving far less attention to personal issues. The sound of the bands on that label — such as Econochrist — featured screeching vocals, heavy distortion with thick chord progressions, and busy drums. It contained few, if any, guitar solos. East coast United States bands, such as Rorschach and Born Against also played a similar left-wing, almost Marxist hardcore. Gravity Records was another notable record label of the 1990s hardcore scene, releasing bands such as Antioch Arrow, Clikatat Ikatowi (both of which were spinoffs of the San Diego band Heroin) and The Locust. Antioch Arrow's music was brutal and spastic, with a goth aesthetic. Clikatat Ikatowi combined pounding tribal drums and dissonant guitar with a post-punk aesthetic. Gravity Records was later associated with the power violence genre.

Metalcore bands in the 2000s with a heavier sound ******* From Ashes Rise and Tragedy, who play a brand of melodic crustcore. The straight edge scene became prominent in the 1990s, with the youth crew style becoming popular among hardline and vegan straight edge bands such as Earth Crisis.

[edit] Hardcore in the 2000s

Many hardcore bands in the 2000s have stuck to the musical and roots and ideals of the original hardcore punk scene, although the hardcore scene has evolved somewhat since the 1980s. Many contemporary bands play hardcore in the original style while attempting to add more intensity to the music. One common trend is to try to capture the sound of influential bands from an earlier era. For example, D-beat bands emulate the early music of Discharge. D-beat bands ******* Deathcharge, Dischange, and Disclose. Two record labels that have continued to release hardcore in the 2000s are Bridge 9 Records and Revelation Records. However, Revelation has been known to stray from the accepted boundaries of hardcore, with releases by indie rock and emo bands such as Elliot and Texas Is The Reason.

The term hardcore has been applied to some bands that play death metal, metalcore or thrash metal; such as Poison the Well Typical of this new genre are breakdowns and harshly delivered vocals; sometimes verging on death metal growls. As this music has evolved, so has the subculture associated with it (e.g. fashioncore). Some hardcore bands of the 2000s, such as Career Suicide and Fucked Up, have continued the sound and attitude of the 1980s hardcore scene. Most of these types of bands are from Canada or the eastern United States. Some bands have created a sound that has been described as melodic hardcore. Examples of those bands ******* Strike Anywhere, Set Your Goals, Crime in Stereo and Shook Ones. This sound is often associated with east coast United States cities such as New York City and New Jersey (although Set Your Goals is from the bay area, and Shook Ones is from Seattle). Many of these bands are influenced by 1990s bands such as Lifetime, Kid Dynamite, and H2O.

[edit] Hardcore punk record labels

* Alternative Tentacles
* Alveran Records
* Bad Taste Records
* Blackout! Records
* Bridge 9 Records
* Burning Heart Records
* BYO Records
* Century Media
* Common Bond Records
* Dischord
* Ebullition Records
* Epitaph Records
* Equal Vision Records
* Eulogy Recordings
* Facedown Records
* Hellcat Records
* Indecision Records
* Lifeforce Records
* Revelation Records
* Solid State Records
* Spook City Records
* SST Records
* TAANG! Records
* Trustkill Records
* Uprising Records
* Victory Records

[edit] See also

* Straight edge
* Youth crew

[edit] Notes

1. Blush, Stephen (November 9, 2001). American Hardcore: A Tribal History. Feral House. ISBN 0922915717.
2. "Hardcore Punk music history". Silver Dragon Records (2003). Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
3. "D.O.A. To Rock Toronto International Film Festival". PunkOiUK. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
4. "D.O.A.". punknews.org. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
5. "Black Flag: 1981". Dementlieu Punk Archive. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
6. http://www.btinternet.com/~thisispun...s/4/middle.htm
7. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p...0:fbfexqw5ldae
8. "Playlists and Archives for Pat Duncan". WFMU. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
9. "Tim Sommer". Beastiemania.com. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
10. "A short history of Kraut". Liner Notes from Complete Studio Recordings 1982-1986. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
11. http://www.chips-tv.com/wiki/index.p...e_of_the_Bands
12. Harrington, Joe S. (2002). Sonic Cool: The Life & Death of Rock 'n' Roll (Milwaukee, Wisc.: Hal Leonard). ISBN 0-634-02861-8, p. 388
13. Reynolds, Simon (2005). Rip It Up and Start Again: Post Punk 1978–1984 (London and New York: Faber and Faber). ISBN 0-571-21569-6, pp. 460-467
14. Azerrad, Michael (2001). Our Band Could Be Your Life (New York: Little, Brown). ISBN 0-316-78753-1, p. 419

[edit] References

* Going Underground: American Punk 1979-1992 (George Hurchalla, Zuo Press, 2005)
* Smash the State: A Discography of Canadian Punk, 1977-92 (Frank Manley, No Exit, 1993), ISBN 0-9696631-0-2

[edit] External links

* KFTH An online hardcore discography
* The Punk Vault History of punk and hardcore
* Scanner zine Interview with 'Going Underground' author, George Hurchalla from 2006
* Hardcore punk! A hardcore punk community with several videos and demos of hardcore punk bands.

Hardcore punk
Anarcho-punk - Christian hardcore - Crust punk - D-beat - Emo - Funkcore - Grindcore - Hatecore - Melodic hardcore - Metalcore - Nazi punk - Oi! - Post-hardcore - Powerviolence - Punk rock - Queercore - Rock Against Communism - Ska-core - Skate punk - Streetpunk - Taqwacore- Thrash metal - Thrashcore - UK82 -Youth crew
Regional Scenes
Australia - Brazil - Canada - Italy - Greece - Japan - Scandinavia - South Wales - Umeå - Yugoslavia

United States: Boston - California - Chicago - Detroit - Minneapolis - New Jersey - New York - North Carolina - Phoenix - DC
Other topics
DIY ethic - Hardcore bands - Hardcore dancing - Hardline - Punk ideologies - Second wave punk musicians - Straight edge
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardcore_punk"

Categories: Articles lacking reliable references from May 2007 | Articles with unsourced statements since April 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since March 2007 | Articles that may contain original research | NPOV disputes from June 2007 | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | Hardcore punk | Punk genres
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Luke de Spa is offline
Old 06-10-2007, 01:03 PM   #38
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Hardcore wrestling
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Hardcore wrestling is a form of professional wrestling that eschews traditional concepts of match rules in favor of matches that take place in unusual environments, using foreign objects that are not normally permitted. Although hardcore wrestling is a staple among some wrestling promotions, where they are used at the climaxes of feuds, some promotions (such as Big Japan Pro Wrestling and Combat Zone Wrestling) specialized in hardcore wrestling, with many matches performed in this manner.

Hardcore wrestling became acknowledged as a major wrestling style first in Japan with promotions such as FMW and W*ING. It then became successful in America with Extreme Championship Wrestling. The World Wrestling Federation capitalizing on the success and introduced the WWF Hardcore Championship. The WWF soon began to turn the matches into comedy skits, illustrating the ridiculousness they involved. Hardcore is in sound contrast to traditional mat-based wrestling, where solid technical skills are preferred over stuntwork, blood, and sheer shock value.

The term garbage wrestling is attributed to Japanese wrestler Giant Baba who used it originally to describe a style of wrestling which required little wrestling athletic ability and often involved no wrestling at all, which is rather common in much of hardcore wrestling. Some in the United States consider it a derogatory term.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Rules
* 2 Common weapons
* 3 Hardcore wrestlers
o 3.1 Men
+ 3.1.1 Japanese wrestlers
+ 3.1.2 American and international wrestlers
+ 3.1.3 Mexican wrestlers
o 3.2 Women
+ 3.2.1 Japanese wrestlers
+ 3.2.2 American and international wrestlers
* 4 Hardcore championship
* 5 Hardcore wrestling promotions
* 6 Criticism
* 7 See also

[edit] Rules

The main rule behind hardcore can have various connotations. Thus, hardcore wrestling is often separated into distinct "levels" based on the graphic nature of the match:

* A 24/7 Title Match describes a situation where a hardcore wrestler must defend the title at all times. The match (and the title) can be won by pinfall at any time and in any place in the presence of a referee. The match has no fixed location, timeframe or even opponent. This is one of the most severe forms of hardcore match given its unpredictablility. This was initially a self-imposed stipulation of Crash Holly's WWE Hardcore Championship but afterward became a general rule of the title. During the time Crash defended his title, he did so in such locations as his hotel room, at the airport and even at the circus.
* A No Disqualification match tends to be less severe, with action taking place mostly inside the ring. Usage of foreign objects is typically minimal, with run-ins (another form of disqualification) being frequently used. The match is often contested between valets (where they may lack wrestling skills), or between a wrestler and a valet (in which a wrestler is expected to run-in and defend their valets). Because of the low-key nature, few consider a no-disqualification match as hardcore, although there is no semantic difference.
* A Deathmatch tends to be the most severe, with a heavy emphasis on the usage of foreign objects to induce bleeding. The types of foreign objects and the nature of the foreign objects are used so as to be extremely graphic and violent in nature. In more recent years, some state athletic commissions in the US have cracked down on the types and frequency of weapons used in these matches.
* A Hardcore match tends to be somewhere in between, with emphasis on the brutality of the attacks and the extreme physical toll on the wrestlers involved.
* Combat Zone Wrestling's Cage of Death, which is held yearly, implements the use of multiple weapons attached to the cage walls. The usual weapons are there, as are unusual ones, such as weedwhackers.

Because of the nature of hardcore wrestling, hardcore matches are often remembered for their dangerous spots (to the point that some deride it as "spotfests") rather than their actual outcome. The hardcore style has even extended to non-hardcore matches (that is, matches with disqualifications), especially into those where disqualifications are uncommon, where the rules allow or encourage the use of certain foreign objects, or where the rules of the match are ambiguous with regards to disqualification. It is not uncommon to have certain types of matches be no-disqualification affairs to avoid the issue of dealing with suspension of disbelief.

[edit] Common weapons

Hardcore matches tend to emphasize the use of certain weapons or the physical toll on the wrestlers, and thus many euphemisms for these matches are employed. (However, the almost kayfabe-breaking accessibility of some of these weapons -- often under the ring -- to wrestlers has led to the noun "plunder" in reference to them.) For example, Street Fights and Bunkhouse Brawls are hardcore-style matches which emphasize that wrestlers need not be in typical wrestling gear when they are battling, while the No Holds Barred match emphasizes the no-disqualification rule. In World Wrestling Entertainment, Extreme rules matches are hardcore-style matches that emphasized the spirit of its former competitor, Extreme Championship Wrestling. Other euphemisms, such as the Good Housekeeping match and Full Metal Mayhem, emphasize the use of certain foreign objects as being legal (the former with kitchen implements, and the latter with metallic objects). In a Fans Bring the Weapons match, wrestlers fight with "weapons" that members of the audience bring to the venue. An Anus Explosion Deathmatch was an FMW special deathmatch where the loser or losing team were abused either by objects or fireworks.

There are several weapons that are used commonly in deathmatch wrestling:

* Fluorescent light tubes
* Barbed wire
* Fire
* Thumbtacks
* Staple gun
* Broken Glass
* Steel folding chair
* Table
* Ladder
* Mousetrap
* Beds of spikes nails
* Barbed wire Baseball Bats
* Barbed wire two-by-four
* Tables
* Barbed Wire
* Thumbtack Bats
* Trash Cans
* Weed whacker
* Road/Street signs
* Kendo sticks/Singapore canes
* Space heater wrapped in barbed wire
* Cacti
* Tank of Scorpions
* Tank of Piranhas
* Tank of Hermit Crabs
* Tank of Snakes (non-venomous)
* Salt, Lemon Juice, boiling concentrated sulphuric acid, hydroflouric acid (to intensify pain on open wounds)
* Razor wire
* Electric tazers
* Meat hooks
* Lobsters
* Lead Pipes
* Razorblade boards
* Chains
* Knives
* Scissors
* Chainsaws
* Cars
* Drills
* Hammer/Sledgehammer
* Cans
* Screwdriver
* Guitar
* Sink
* Handcuffs (to tie the opponent to ropes)
* Chairs
* Crutches
* Cheese graters
* Televisions
* forks
* beer bottles
* Golf club
* Light bulbs
* Shovel
* Cinder blocks
* Pens
* Frying pan
* Wires connected to 30kV overhead lines

[edit] Hardcore wrestlers

Many well-known deathmatch wrestlers are from Japan. In addition, most American wrestlers who participated in deathmatches made their mark in Japan.

[edit] Men

[edit] Japanese wrestlers

* Mr Pogo (deathmatch)
* Tarzan Goto
* Keiji Takayama (Gedo)
* Shoji Akiyoshi (Jado)
* Masato Tanaka (deathmatch)
* Survival Tobita
* Hayabusa (deathmatch)
* Tomoaki Honma (deathmatch)
* Atsushi Onita (The Great Nita) (deathmatch)
* Ryuji Ito (deathmatch)
* Jun Kasai (deathmatch)
* Shadow WX (deathmatch)
* Mokujin Ken (Ken the Box) (deathmatch)
* Ryuji Yamakawa (deathmatch)
* Takashi Sasaki (deathmatch)
* Naoki "Jaki" Numazawa (deathmatch)
* GYAOPPI (deathmatch)
* Kintaro Kanemura(deathmatch)
* Yoshihiro Tajiri
* Shoji Nakamaki (deathmatch)
* BADBOY Hido (deathmatch)
* Apeman Vargon
* Abdullah Kobayashi (deathmatch)
* Mitsuhiro "Mr. Danger" Matsunaga (deathmatch)
* Mr. Gannosuke (deathmatch)
* Hiroshi Ono (deathmatch)
* Togi Makabe (deathmatch)
* Hisakatsu Oya
* Koji Nakagawa (GOEMON)
* Keiji Mutoh (The Great Muta)

[edit] American and international wrestlers

* Vampiro
* Supreme
* Terry Gordy
* Bam Bam Bigelow
* Tiger Jeet Singh
* The Headhunters
* Wifebeater (deathmatch)
* Homeless Jimmy (Tournament of Death)
* Leatherface (deathmatch)
* Necro Butcher (deathmatch)
* Crash Holly (22-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Hardcore Holly (6-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Tazz (2-times ECW World Champion)
* Nick Mondo (deathmatch)
* Shaggy 2 Dope
* Ruckus
* "Hardcore Homie"The Rude Boy[1]
* Mick Foley (King of the deathmatch, first WWF/E Hardcore Champion)
* Vic Grimes
* Rob Van Dam
* Sabu
* The Sandman
* Tommy Dreamer
* Raven (27-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Stevie Richards (22-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Rhyno
* Balls Mahoney
* Spike Dudley
* Bubba Ray Dudley
* D-Von Dudley
* Axl Rotten
* New Jack
* Terry Funk(deathmatch)
* The Moondogs
* B.J. Whitmer
* "The Monster" Abyss
* Ian Rotten (deathmatch)
* John Zandig (deathmatch)
* The Messiah (deathmatch)
* Nick Gage (deathmatch)
* Justice Pain (deathmatch)
* Lobo (deathmatch)
* Madman Pondo (deathmatch)
* Toby Klein (deathmatch)
* Corporal Robinson (deathmatch)
* Drake Younger (deathmatch)
* The Sheik
* Flash Flanagan (deathmatch)
* Abdullah the Butcher
* John Kronus
* Brian Lee
* Mike Awesome
* Mikey Whipwreck
* J.C. Bailey
* Nate Hatred
* Al Snow
* CW Anderson
* Steve Corino
* Kid Kash
* "The Sadistic Artist" Lil' Hearse
* Latin American Exchange
* Cursed

[edit] Mexican wrestlers

* Psicosis
* Super Crazy
* Angel
* Halloween
* Mr. Aguila
* Crazy Boy
* Joe Lider
* Damian 666
* Xtreme Tiger
* Kid Kaos
* Shiryu Dragon
* Shenky
* Amazing Kid
* Morvius
* Hellhammer
* X-Rider
* Slade
* Nicho el Millonario
* Nightmare
* Dralion
* Lord Byron
* Sickboy
* Insane
* Xtreme Dragon
* Mayhem
* Erick Snake
* Vertigo
* Skam13
* Murder Angel
* Furor
* Titanik
* Golden Boy
* Azteca Warrior
* Galactar
* Black Soul
* Beto Alcala
* Morvius
* Marrullero
* Simbolo
* Voltaje Negro

[edit] Women

[edit] Japanese wrestlers

* Combat Toyoda
* Shark Tsuchiya
* Megumi Kudo
* Bad Nurse Nakamura
* Miwa Sato
* Mayumi Ozaki
* Crusher Maedomari
* Yukie Nabeno

[edit] American and international wrestlers

* Beastie the Road Warrior
* Mickie Knuckles
* LuFisto
* Princesa Sugei
* El Santo Tribute: Dark Angel
* Nikki Roxx
* Luna
* Beulah McGillicutty

[edit] Hardcore championship

In promotions where Hardcore wrestling is present, a Hardcore title may come into exsistence. This form of title is defended under hardcore rules, and title changes are frequent. Some hardcore titles may have their own unique rules. For example, the WWE Hardcore Championship was defended under 24/7 rules, meaning it could be defended and won at anytime, provided a referee was present to make the pinfall. The OVW Hardcore Championship had a trashcan passed from wrestler to wrestler rather than a belt. The GHC Openweight Hardcore Championship has a unique stipulation in that if the challenger survives 15 minutes, he wins the match and the title. Some Hardcore titles *******:

* WWE Hardcore Championship: 1998-2002, 2006
* WCW Hardcore Championship: 1999-2000
* BJW Death Match Championship (Japan): 1998-Present
* BJW Eight Man Scramble Championship (Japan) : 1999
* BJW Big Authorization Death Match Championship (Japan)
* BJW Barbed Wire Street Fight Six Man Tag Team Title (Japan)
* JCW Juggalo Championship : 1999-Present
* GHC Openweight Hardcore Championship (Japan): 2004-Present
* BWA Hardcore Championship: 2002-Present [2]
* RCW Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* IPW Hardcore Championship [3]
* PWU Hardcore Championship [4]
* FOW Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* CPW Hardcore Championship [5]
* TNW Hardcore Championship [6]
* TCW Hardcore Championship [7]
* WXw Hardcore Championship
* WZW Hardcore Championship [8]
* NCW Hardcore Championship [9]
* CWA Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* NWL Hardcore Championship: 2000- [10]
* IHW Hardcore Championship: 1999-Present[citation needed]
* ECCW/NWA Pacific Northwest Hardcore Championship 1999-present
* FMW Brass Knuckles Title (Japan): 1990-1999
* FMW Independent Championship (Japan): 1996-1999
* IWA Hardcore Championship (Puerto Rico): 2000-Present
* CZW Ultraviolent Underground Championship 2005-Present
* CZW/NWA Intrapromotional Hardcore Championship: 1999
* XPW World Heavyweight Championship: 1999-2002
* WEW Hardcore Championship (Japan): 1999-2001
* WWC Hardcore Championship (Puerto Rico): 1999-2001
* NWA Texas Hardcore Championship: 1999-2001 [11]
* CWA Hardcore Championship [12]
* OVW Hardcore Championship: 2000-2001
* WWA Hardcore Championship: 2001-2002
* WPW Hardcore Championship: 1999-Present [13]
* Saitama Pro Wrestling Company Monster Attack Champion (Japan)
* Lucha Libre Feminil (LLF) Extreme Championship
* BWF Hardcore Championship [14]
* UCW Hardcore Championship [15]
* World Brass Knuckles Championship (mainly used in various Southern-based wrestling promotions)

[edit] Hardcore wrestling promotions

* Big Japan Pro Wrestling
* Nueva Generacion Extrema(NGX) (Mexico)
* Orden de Lucha Extrema(OLX) (Mexico)
* Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW)
* NWA: Extreme Canadian Championship Wrestling (ECCW)
* Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) — now defunct, though has been revived as a brand for World Wrestling Entertainment
* Frontier Martial Arts Wrestling (FMW) — now defunct
* International Wrestling Syndicate
* Insane Hardcore Wrestling (IHW)[citation needed]
* Psychotic Wrestling Alliance UK [16]
* Saitama Pro Wrestling Company (SPWC) (Japan)
* International Wrestling Association of Japan — now defunct
* Pro Pain Pro Wrestling (3PW) — now defunct
* UWA/PWA Hardcore Wrestling
* W*ING — now defunct
* Xtreme Latin American Wrestling (XLAW) (Mexico)[citation needed]
* Xtreme Pro Wrestling (XPW) — now defunct
* Mid American Wrestling (Occasionally)
* IWA Japan
* IWA East Coast
* IWA Deep South
* IWA Mid South

[edit] Criticism

Many fans of traditional professional wrestling, or simply wrestling in general, find the pure hardcore style appalling and unworthy of the title of professional wrestling, considering it little more than glorified streetfighting with weapons. Aside from Giant Baba coining the term "garbage wrestling" (which is rather characteristic, as many hardcore matches start and/or end with garbage items filling the ring), multi-time World Champion Ric Flair has also criticized exclusively hardcore performers like Mick Foley of being "glorified stuntmen" due to the radical spots he has performed throughout his career combined with his self-admitted lack of ability to do any other sort of match in the ring.[17] The critics of hardcore wrestling do not necessarily reject the idea of hardcore matches or spots in professional wrestling. What they react most negatively to is poor or unskilled wrestlers incapable of wrestling any other style making careers out of being hardcore wrestlers.

The hardcore wrestling style also tended to burn itself out if used too much. Each spotfest raised expectations for the next one leading to excess and eventually self-parody. In the World Wrestling Federation, the concept of hardcore wrestling became by company plan a parody of itself. Not long after the birth of the WWF Hardcore Championship, and the 24/7 rule it constituted, the title became the subject of comedic scenarios and exchanged hands more than any other championship, quickly degrading whatever value it had as a championship belt. A similar event took place in World Championship Wrestling with Norman Smiley and manager Jimmy Hart approaching hardcore bouts, suited up in football gear and Medieval plate armor, while pushing shopping carts filled with foreign objects to the ring.

In terms of ring psychology, many fans consider the worst examples of hardcore wrestling to be "spotfests" and claim that the matches have no direction. This is attributed to the idea that they rely heavily on drastic spots with no transition between them aside from often unrealistically setting up the next spot and with little concern over the actual result of the match. Matches may find themselves in awkward looking moments due to the difficulty in setting up a highly dangerous spot, as evident when New Jack and Vic Grimes clinched onto one another, hesitantly preparing to fall off a 20-foot scaffold. The spot resulted in both men falling to the concrete floor and New Jack receiving both brain damage and permanent blindness in his right eye.

Performance which takes place between these major spots is often subject to elementary brawling or usage of less "damaging" weapons like a crutch or flimsy aluminum tray and, as aforementioned, may be restricted to obscure situations of spot preparation. This is in stark contrast to conventional wrestling which requires a practice and technique to accomplish the various stages of a match and maintain the effect of a real battle.

The "anything goes" ruling may also require an even greater suspension of disbelief than mat wrestling due to the fact that, in kayfabe, the performers may use absolutely any items they choose as weapons. The matches can fall into almost cartoonish levels of violence where weapons that should cause serious injury in the real world do no harm at all. They also often avoid weapons that could help win a match in favor of those that allow for the theatrical suffering or mutilation of their opponent such as a staple gun, broken glass, cacti, or even small biting animals. Many such elements are embellished even further in the "deathmatch" style virtually unseen in mainstream western promotions, with heavy emphasis on blood, mutilation, and shock value. These elements introduce perhaps a much darker side to the world of professional wrestling with its constant aim to please fans.

[edit] See also

* Backyard Wrestling
* List of professional wrestling styles

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardcore_wrestling"

Categories: Articles lacking sources from February 2007 | All articles lacking sources | Articles with unsourced statements since March 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Professional wrestling | Professional wrestling genres

 
Luke de Spa is offline
Old 06-10-2007, 01:04 PM   #39
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Hardcore punk
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Hardcore punk
Stylistic origins: Punk rock
Cultural origins: Early 1980s North America
Typical instruments: Vocals - Guitar - Bass - Drums
Mainstream popularity: Low to Mid
Derivative forms: Alternative rock - Grunge - Emo - Post-hardcore
Subgenres
Christian hardcore - Crust punk - D-beat - Grindcore - Melodic hardcore - Powerviolence - Skate punk - Thrashcore - Youth crew
Fusion genres
Crossover thrash - Funkcore - Metalcore
Regional scenes
Australia - Brazil - Canada - Europe: Italy - South Wales - Scandinavia: Umeå - Japan - USA: Boston - California - Chicago - Detroit - Minneapolis - New Jersey - New York - North Carolina - Philadelphia - Phoenix - DC
Other topics
Hardcore dancing - Straight edge - DIY punk ethic - List of bands

Hardcore punk is a subgenre of punk rock that originated in the United States in the late 1970s. It emerged as many of the first-wave punk bands disbanded or moved onto different genres, and as many of the newer punk musicians focused on music with faster tempos, louder volume and harder bass levels.[1] The hardcore punk sound is generally thicker, heavier, and faster than 1970s-style punk rock, and it is sometimes characterized by short, loud, and passionate songs about serious topics such as government, capitalism, war and the punk subculture itself. The full phrase hardcore punk usually refers to a music style from the early 1980s (and music by current bands of similar style) that has more in common with punk rock than it does with a more recent style that referred to as simply hardcore; which has more in common with metal than punk.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Origins
* 2 The big three
* 3 Other early notable bands
* 4 Early support
* 5 Negative publicity
* 6 Slam dancing
* 7 Influence
* 8 Early history in Europe
* 9 Hardcore in the 1990s
o 9.1 Metalcore
o 9.2 Progression and experimentation
* 10 Hardcore in the 2000s
* 11 Hardcore punk record labels
* 12 See also
* 13 Notes
* 14 References
* 15 External links

[edit] Origins

The music genre that became known as hardcore punk originated in different areas of North America in late 1980 and early 1981. Some of the major areas in North America associated with the origins of hardcore punk *******: California, Washington, DC, Chicago, New York City, Vancouver and Boston. At the same time, a British equivalent had emerged, although it would not be known as UK 82 or British hardcore until later. The origin of the term hardcore punk is uncertain, however one theory is that the Vancouver-based band D.O.A. made the term official with the title of their 1981 album, Hardcore '81.[2][3][4] Until about 1983, the term hardcore was used fairly sparingly, and mainly as a descriptive term. (i.e., a band would be called a "hardcore band" and a concert would be a "hardcore show"). American teenagers who were fans of hardcore punk simply considered themselves fans of punk — although they were not necessarily interested in the original punk rock sound of late 1970s (i.e. the Sex Pistols, the Ramones, Johnny Thunders and the Heartbreakers). In many circles, hardcore was an in-group term, meaning 'music by people like us,' and it *******d a wide range of sounds, from hyper-speed punk rock to sludgy dirge-rock, and often including arty experimental bands, such as The Stickmen and Flipper.

Hardcore was noted for its do-it-yourself (DIY) approach. In most cities (California being the exception) the hardcore scene relied entirely on DIY recordings, zines, radio shows and concerts due to many bands having little to no access to any means of production. Hardcore punk fans brought a dressed-down T-shirt, jeans, and crewcut style to punk fashion. This contrasted with the more elaborate and provocative clothing styles of many 1970s punk rockers, such as Richard Hell, Sid Vicious and Soo Catwoman.

[edit] The big three
Black Flag, June 1985
Black Flag, June 1985

Michael Azerrad's Our Band Could Be Your Life traces hardcore back to three bands: Black Flag, Bad Brains and Minor Threat. He calls Black Flag, formed in Los Angeles in 1976, the music’s "godfathers." Azerrad credits Bad Brains, formed in Washington, D.C. in 1977, with introducing "light speed" tempos. He calls Minor Threat, formed in Washington, D.C. in 1980, the "definitive" hardcore punk band. Minor Threat, also from Washington, DC, formed out of the short-lived Teen Idles. Carry-over members of The Teen Idles were Ian MacKaye (who went on to co-found post-hardcore group Fugazi and Embrace) and Jeff Nelson. Minor Threat played an aggressive, fast, hardcore punk style influenced by Bad Brains. The band was responsible for inspiring the straight edge movement, with their song of the same name. After the Teen Idles broke up, MacKaye and Nelson put the band's concert money toward founding Dischord Records, initially to release their Minor Disturbance EP on vinyl. The record label went on to release EPs by Minor Threat and many other early Washington, DC hardcore bands.

Black Flag had a major impact on the Los Angeles scene—and later the wider North American scene—with their raw, confrontational sound and DIY ethical stance. The original lineup featured Keith Morris (later of the Circle Jerks), and the final lineup featured former State of Alert singer Henry Rollins, who first sang with Black Flag at a concert in New York City on June 27, 1981.[5] While their musical influence was limited (few contemporary bands sounded similar to Black Flag), their tireless work[citation needed] in promoting their own concerts and releasing self-financed records inspired other bands to do the same. Tours in 1980 and 1981 brought Black Flag in contact with developing hardcore scenes in many parts of North America.

Bad Brains are an African-American band that formed in Washington, DC. The band members had backgrounds in soul music, funk, and jazz, and were influenced by rock bands such as Black Sabbath and the Sex Pistols. The single "Pay to Cum" b/w "Stay Close to Me" was released in 1980. Their first album (originally a 1981 cassette-only release from Reachout International Records) *******d three reggae songs, in sharp contrast to the rest of their music, which mainly consisted of fast, loud, hardcore punk.

[edit] Other early notable bands
Music samples:

* "Pay to Cum" (file info) — [Play media] play in browser (beta)
o Sample of "Pay to Cum" by the Bad Brains from Pay to Cum single (1980)
o Problems listening to the file? See media help.

Several 1970s bands from southern California released records featuring music that sounds very similar to what later became known as hardcore. One of those records is the Middle Class’ 1978 Out of Vogue EP.[6] It is unclear the extent to which this early record (and the inclusion of the band's music on the 1979 compilation LP Tooth & Nail) directly inspired hardcore. Mentions of them in contemporary publications are sparse, and little notice appears to have been taken of them outside the Los Angeles area. A more influential record was The Germs’ 1979 LP (GI); essentially a hardcore record, not only for its quick tempos but also for its fast chord changes. Also from Orange County, T.S.O.L (formed in 1978) made a name for themselves in the hardcore punk scene with a melodic yet aggressive pop punk sound.

San Francisco's Dead Kennedys formed in 1978 and released their first single "California Über Alles" in 1979. By the time they released the In God We Trust, Inc. EP in 1981, Dead Kennedys were playing very fast tempos. Circle Jerks’ first album (recorded in late 1979, released 1980) features several songs with very fast chord changes and tempos. The Misfits (of New Jersey) were a 1977-style punk band involved in New York’s Max's Kansas City scene. Their horror film aesthetic was popular among early hardcore fans. In 1981, the Misfits integrated high-speed thrash songs into their set. Hüsker Dü was formed in Saint Paul, Minnesota in 1979 as a post-punk/new wave band, but soon became a loud and fast hard punk band. Hüsker Dü released the 1982 live album Land Speed Record, which has been called a "breakneck force like no other... Not for the faint of heart."[7] By 1985, the band morphed into one of the seminal alternative rock bands.

By 1981, many more hardcore punk bands began to perform and release demos and records, including the Neos of Victoria, British Columbia; Negative Approach of Detroit; The Meatmen of Lansing, Michigan; The Necros of Maumee, Ohio; The Effigies of Chicago; SS Decontrol, DYS, Negative FX, Jerry's Kids, and Gang Green of Boston; Zeroption of Toronto; the Big Boys, MDC and The Dicks of Austin, Texas; and Sadistic Exploits of Philadelphia. The Beastie Boys, more widely known for their later hip hop music, were one of the first published hardcore bands in New York City.

Negative FX, perhaps the most popular hardcore band in Boston around early 1982, did not appear on record while they were together. They were largely unknown outside their own area until a posthumous album was released in 1984. Notable early hardcore punk records ******* The Angry Samoans’ first LP, the Big Boys/The Dicks Live at Raul's Club split LP, the Boston-area compilation This Is Boston, Not L.A., Minor Threat's 7" EPs, JFA's Blatant Localism EP, the New York-area compilations New York Thrash and The Big Apple Rotten To The Core, Negative Approach's eponymous EP and the DC-area compilation record Flex Your Head.

[edit] Early support

An influential radio show in the Los Angeles area was Rodney on the ROQ, on the commercial station KROQ. DJ Rodney Bingenheimer played many styles of music, and helped popularize what was, circa 1979–80, called Beach Punk — a rowdy suburban style played by mostly teenage bands in and around Huntington Beach, and in heavily conservative Orange County. He would come under attack from the thriving late 70's punk band the Angry Samoans. Early support in New York City & New Jersey came from Pat Duncan who hosted live punk and hardcore bands weekly on WFMU since 1979.[8] and Tim Sommer who hosted "Noise The Show" on WNYU.[9] In 1982-1983, MTV put the hardcore band Kraut on mild rotation.[10]

College radio was, however, the main outlet for hardcore punk in most of North America. The San Francisco-area public radio station KPFA featured the Maximum RocknRoll radio show with DJs Tim Yohannon and Jeff Bale, who played the younger Northern California bands. A wave of zines helped spread the new punk style, such as Flipside. In late 1981, Yohannon and Bale’s Maximum RocknRoll zine, modeled on Tim Tonooka's Ripper, had a national circulation and featured scene reports from around the country. A strong infrastructure of independent labels, linked with radio outlets and 'zines helped to create a nationwide subculture.

[edit] Negative publicity

Concerts in the early hardcore scene increasingly became sites of violent battles between police and concertgoers; especially in Los Angeles. Many concert venues were trashed on both coasts of the United States, despite frantic pleas from 'zine writers. Henry Rollins argued that in his experience, the police caused far more problems than they solved at hardcore performances. Reputed violence at hardcore concerts was featured in episodes of the popular television shows CHiPs and Quincy, M.E., in which Los Angeles hardcore punks were depicted as being involved in murder and mayhem.[11] Contemporary 'zine writers claimed that these media portrayals attracted new, violent people to the concerts, acting at least partially as a cause of the problem.

[edit] Slam dancing

Main articles: Mosh and Hardcore dancing

The hardcore punk scene of the early 80's gave rise to slam dancing and stage diving.[citation needed] The music was perfectly suited for it as were the venues, with their small atmosphere and easy accessible stages. Mosh was a term used in reggae and ska style music.In the later half of the 80s the thrash metal scene would imitate this form of dancing, with Anthrax popularizing the term "mosh" with the metal scene.[citation needed] Moshing also started being seen at harder college rock shows. In modern times the term "hardcore dancing" describes a style of dance which imitates fighting the air on the spot.[citation needed]

[edit] Influence

Hardcore had a huge influence on other forms of rock music in North America. The San-Francisco-based thrash metal band Metallica were among the first crossover artists, incorporating the compositional structure and technical proficiency of metal with the speed and aggression of hardcore. The new style became known as thrash metal, and later speed metal. Other early bands in this genre ******* Megadeth and Anthrax. Slayer are also well known for their hardcore punk roots, and have released an album formed entirely of hardcore covers called Undisputed Attitude.

The rising influence of heavy metal in the hardcore scene (circa 1984-1985) dismayed some hardcore punks, who felt that hardcore musicians who crossed over to metal styles were embracing a musical style that hardcore punk had originally rejected. However, some musicians in the first wave of hardcore, such as members of Bad Brains and Black Flag, had been influenced by heavy metal acts such as Black Sabbath. Longtime hardcore punks, who remembered fighting with hostile metalheads only a fews years earlier, now felt that those same people were attempting to co-opt hardcore. These die-hard hardcore punks argued that the new long-haired interpreters of hardcore were merely mimicking emotions such as raw anger, that they did not truly feel.

A 1986 concert by the UK band Discharge in New York City generated brief international notoriety when a crowd of roughly 1,500 paid $10 admission and pelted the band with garbage, an apparent response to the band's turn to a more metallic sound.

In 1985, New York's Stormtroopers of Death, an Anthrax side project, released the album Speak English or Die. Though it bore similarities to thrash metal, such as a characteristic bass-heavy guitar and fast tempos and chord changes, the album was distinguished from thrash metal by its lack of guitar solos and heavy use of crunchy chord breakdowns (a New York hardcore technique) known as "mosh parts". Other bands, such as Suicidal Tendencies and DRI, switched from hardcore to a similar metallic style, which came to be known as crossover.

Many hardcore bands began experimenting with other styles, moods and concerns as their careers progressed in the 1980s, becoming known as alternative rock. Bands such as Minutemen, Hüsker Dü, and The Replacements drew from hardcore but broke even further away from its "loud-fast" formula; critic Joe S. Harrington suggests the latter two "paraded as Hardcore until it was deemed permissible to do otherwise".[12] These bands diversified the genre's sound in ways that would be a major influence on later alternative rock bands.[13] Grunge music was especially heavily influenced by hardcore. In the mid-1980s, Washington State bands such as The Melvins and Green River developed a sludgy, "aggressive sound that melded the slower tempos of heavy metal with the intensity of hardcore."[14] The sense of liberation that many of the grunge bands got — that you don't have to be the greatest musicians to form a band — was at least as important as the music. Even though the early grunge sound was more influenced by Black Sabbath and Black Flag's My War album than hardcore punk rock, bands like Mudhoney and Nirvana instilled a traditional hardcore influence as well as take the sound into more conventional pop-oriented territory. Kurt Cobain once described Nirvana's sound as "The Knack and The Bay City Rollers being molested by Black Flag and Black Sabbath." The popularity of grunge resulted in renewed interest in American hardcore in the '90s.

The hardcore punk scene had an influence that spread far beyond music. The straight edge philosophy was rooted in a faction of hardcore particularly popular on the east coast of the United States. Hardcore also put a great emphasis on the DIY punk ethic, with many bands making their own records, flyers, and other items, and booking their own tours through an informal network of like-minded people. Radical environmentalism and veganism found popular expressions in the hardcore scene.

More recently, hardcore punk has given life to new styles of pop punk. Some contemporary pop punk bands (often containing members of former hardcore bands such as New Found Glory's Chad of Shai Hulud fame) have created a new blend of the style by mixing hardcore influences. A phenomenon referred to as the "pop punk breakdown" has become increasingly popular, in which bands play hardcore style breakdowns with more melodic chords.

[edit] Early history in Europe

The Netherlands, Finland, Sweden, and Germany have had notably active hardcore scenes. However, in the United Kingdom, UK82 (also known as UK Hardcore) bands such as The Exploited, Charged GBH, Discharge, and The Anti-Nowhere League occupied the cultural space that American-style hardcore did elsewhere. These UK bands at times showed a musical similarity to American hardcore, often including quick tempos and chord changes, and they generally had similar political and social sensibilities. However, they represented a case of parallel evolution, having been musically inspired by earlier London Oi! bands such as Sham 69, and the proto-speed metal band Motörhead.

Discharge played a huge role in influencing the early Swedish hardcore bands, such as Anti Cimex. Many hardcore bands from that region still have a strong Discharge and Motörhead influence. The band Entombed is also cited as a strong influence on Swedish hardcore bands from the early 1990s onward.

In much the same way, anarcho-punk bands such as Crass, Icons of Filth, Flux Of Pink Indians and Rudimentary Peni had little in common with American hardcore other than an uncompromising political philosophy and an abrasive aesthetic. Many American hardcore punks listened to British punk bands, but others upheld a strict regionalism, deriding the UK bands as rock stars, and their fans as poseurs. Expressive fans of Crass were called Crassholes.

American hardcore bands that visited the UK (such as Black Flag and U.S.CHAOS in 1981-1982) encountered equally ambivalent attitudes. European hardcore bands suffered no such prejudice in the U.S.; Italian bands Raw Power and Negazione, and the Dutch BGK, enjoyed widespread popularity.

In the more underground part of the UK punk scene, a new hardcore sound and scene developed, inspired by continental European, Scandinavian, Japanese and American bands. It was started by bands like Asylum and Plasmid, and their sound — only heard at live concerts and on demo tapes and compilations in the mid 1980s — evolved into bands such as Heresy, Ripcord, Napalm Death, Hellbastard, Doom, The Stupids, Concrete Sox, Jailcell Recipes, Visions of Change and Extreme Noise Terror.

Some of the most important influences among late-1980s UK bands *******d the Japanese band GISM; Boston band Siege, Idaho band Septic Death, and Swedish band Anti Cimex; as well as more metallic bands such as Celtic Frost and Metallica. However, by the late 1980s, UK bands were becoming far more influenced by American bands such as the Dead Kennedys (who were always very popular in the UK), Black Flag and many of the early Washington, D.C., New York, Boston and West Coast hardcore bands such as Minor Threat, DYS, Slapshot and 7 Seconds. Straight edge began to make its presence felt in the UK, with the emergence of small straight edge communities in most major cities in the UK, and straight edge bands forming in Durham and London.

There were many 1980s bands that could be described as sounding like something in between the styles of the dominating UK and US bands. While the bands that had the most significant influence were parallel-evolved bands such as Discharge and Charged GBH, others, such as The Stupids (a UK band influenced by US hardcore) gained brief but widespread college-radio airplay in the US.

Some notable bands from that era in Europe were Crise Total (Portugal), Negazione, Indigesti, Wretched, Raw Power, Declino,(Italy), H.H.H., MG-15, Eskorbuto (Spain), Inferno, Vorkriegsjugend, Scapegoats (Germany), U.B.R. (Former Yugoslavia), Kafka Process, Barn Av Regnbuen (Norway), Heimat-Los (France), Lärm, BGK, Funeral Oration (Netherlands), Vi, Enola Gay, O.H.M. (Denmark), Dezerter, Armia, Moskwa, Siekiera (Poland), Kaaos, Rattus, Rutto, Kansan Uutiset, Terveet Kädet, Appendix (Finland), Headcleaners, Asocial, Missbrukarna, Sound Of Disaster and Anti-Cimex (Sweden).

Examples of bands that continued to play that style of hardcore in the 1990s *******: Seein Red, Uutuus, Kirous, Health Hazard, Slapshot, Voorhees, Totalitär, Los Crudos, Sin Dios, and Detestation. After fall of the Iron Curtain in eastern Europe, many harcore bands were created or became more publicly known (after hiding in garages and being known by small circles of underground fans). Examples of such bands ******* Brachyblast, Radegast or Sarcastic front from Czech Republic. Hardcore also become popular in Asia in the late 1980s and early 1990s, with bands such as Disaster Funhouse, Chronic Mass, Noisemonger and Cramp Mind from Malaysia; 4-Sides and Stomping Ground from Singapore; Agony of Destruction, Death from Above, Mutual Assured Destruction and Biofeedback from the Philippines; and Disclose and Death Side from Japan.

[edit] Hardcore in the 1990s

In the 1980s, hardcore was strictly a style of North American punk rock. By the end of the 1980s and into the 1990s, hardcore became much more diverse, branching off mainly into two sounds: one traditionally punk-based, the other punk based with a greater metal influence. The punk-focussed sound retains much of the style and feel of the original hardcore bands, while the heavier metal influenced sound, tends to be more technical. Nearly all fans of traditional hardcore do not consider metalcore to be a form of hardcore punk or even a genre altogether.

[edit] Metalcore

Main article: Metalcore

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Being a chiefly urban phenomenon, hardcore often reflected the life of its players and fans. The incorporation of heavy metal (both musically and mentality-wise) led to a sect of hardcore bands branching off into heavier directions. Notable bands who developed the genre in early years ******* Biohazard, Edgewise, and DC's Damnation A.D.. Today, some of the most well-known representatives of the metalcore genre are Norma Jean, The Birds Of Paradise, Converge, Between the buried and me, As I Lay Dying, Throwdown, Underoath, and Killswitch Engage.

The sound is an amalgamation of deep, hoarse vocals (though rarely as deep or guttural as death metal), downtuned guitars, thrashy drum rhythms inspired by earlier hardcore bands, and slow, staccato low-end musical breaks, known as breakdowns. Thrash metal and hip hop elements are also common.

Some of the bands that helped pioneer the mixture of hardcore with death metal in the 1990s were Brooklyn, NY's Merauder and Confusion; Jackson Heights, NY's Dmize. They have been described as a cross between bands like Kreator and Obituary with New York hardcore. Darkside NYC, formed by Alan Blake of Sheer Terror was often described as Celtic Frost meets Sheer Terror musically, and Negative Approach meets Crumbsuckers vocally. They were known for incorporating blastbeats, which was a direct death metal/grindcore influence.

Dmize, Confusion, and Darkside NYC managed to achieve cult status in the U.S., Europe, and Japan while only playing shows in the Northeast US during their short existences. Merauder signed with Century Media and toured the world, still performing today. In upstate NY, All Out War, formed with ex-Merauder members, gained an extremely violent reputation because their audience members would pummel each other. Many concerts ended in a full scale riot.[citation needed] As a result, many clubs were loathe to have these kinds of bands perform. Just as Merauder, DMIZE, Confusion, and Darkside NYC would loathe being called metalcore as they are actually hardcore and do not recognize metalcore as a subgenre of hardcore but as just plain metal or screamo metal.

This particular scene is known for its stereotypical image and attitude of tight jeans, mop-headed haircuts, painted fingernails, eyeliner, etc.

[edit] Progression and experimentation

In the late 1980s, bands such as NoMeansNo and Victim's Family created a new style of music by blending aggressive elements from hardcore with influences from genres such as psychedelic rock, progressive rock, noise, jazz, or math rock (a development sometimes termed jazzcore). This path was followed in the early 1990s by Mr Bungle, Candiria, Deep Turtle and Ruins. The noisecore played by Melt-Banana may have been a separate evolution. Other notable hardcore-influenced bands in this genre ******* the avant-garde Naked City (formed by saxophonist John Zorn) and Neurosis, which started as a hardcore band before exploring slower tempos and dark ambiance. Many bands started to incorporate emotional and personal aspects into their music; influenced by the sounds coming out of Washington, D.C. and Dischord Records, which by the late 1990s had evolved into emo music. Nation of Ulysses was one of the most influential bands to come out of D.C.; combining dissonant guitars similar to those of Black Flag, elements of jazz, and a seemingly absurdist (or situationist) political ideology. Their sound and fashion sense influenced the San Diego (or 'Chula Vista') hardcore scene.

Ebullition Records, founded in 1990 by Kent McClard in Santa Barbara, California, often releasing bands that criticized the American political and economic system; giving far less attention to personal issues. The sound of the bands on that label — such as Econochrist — featured screeching vocals, heavy distortion with thick chord progressions, and busy drums. It contained few, if any, guitar solos. East coast United States bands, such as Rorschach and Born Against also played a similar left-wing, almost Marxist hardcore. Gravity Records was another notable record label of the 1990s hardcore scene, releasing bands such as Antioch Arrow, Clikatat Ikatowi (both of which were spinoffs of the San Diego band Heroin) and The Locust. Antioch Arrow's music was brutal and spastic, with a goth aesthetic. Clikatat Ikatowi combined pounding tribal drums and dissonant guitar with a post-punk aesthetic. Gravity Records was later associated with the power violence genre.

Metalcore bands in the 2000s with a heavier sound ******* From Ashes Rise and Tragedy, who play a brand of melodic crustcore. The straight edge scene became prominent in the 1990s, with the youth crew style becoming popular among hardline and vegan straight edge bands such as Earth Crisis.

[edit] Hardcore in the 2000s

Many hardcore bands in the 2000s have stuck to the musical and roots and ideals of the original hardcore punk scene, although the hardcore scene has evolved somewhat since the 1980s. Many contemporary bands play hardcore in the original style while attempting to add more intensity to the music. One common trend is to try to capture the sound of influential bands from an earlier era. For example, D-beat bands emulate the early music of Discharge. D-beat bands ******* Deathcharge, Dischange, and Disclose. Two record labels that have continued to release hardcore in the 2000s are Bridge 9 Records and Revelation Records. However, Revelation has been known to stray from the accepted boundaries of hardcore, with releases by indie rock and emo bands such as Elliot and Texas Is The Reason.

The term hardcore has been applied to some bands that play death metal, metalcore or thrash metal; such as Poison the Well Typical of this new genre are breakdowns and harshly delivered vocals; sometimes verging on death metal growls. As this music has evolved, so has the subculture associated with it (e.g. fashioncore). Some hardcore bands of the 2000s, such as Career Suicide and Fucked Up, have continued the sound and attitude of the 1980s hardcore scene. Most of these types of bands are from Canada or the eastern United States. Some bands have created a sound that has been described as melodic hardcore. Examples of those bands ******* Strike Anywhere, Set Your Goals, Crime in Stereo and Shook Ones. This sound is often associated with east coast United States cities such as New York City and New Jersey (although Set Your Goals is from the bay area, and Shook Ones is from Seattle). Many of these bands are influenced by 1990s bands such as Lifetime, Kid Dynamite, and H2O.

[edit] Hardcore punk record labels

* Alternative Tentacles
* Alveran Records
* Bad Taste Records
* Blackout! Records
* Bridge 9 Records
* Burning Heart Records
* BYO Records
* Century Media
* Common Bond Records
* Dischord
* Ebullition Records
* Epitaph Records
* Equal Vision Records
* Eulogy Recordings
* Facedown Records
* Hellcat Records
* Indecision Records
* Lifeforce Records
* Revelation Records
* Solid State Records
* Spook City Records
* SST Records
* TAANG! Records
* Trustkill Records
* Uprising Records
* Victory Records

[edit] See also

* Straight edge
* Youth crew

[edit] Notes

1. Blush, Stephen (November 9, 2001). American Hardcore: A Tribal History. Feral House. ISBN 0922915717.
2. "Hardcore Punk music history". Silver Dragon Records (2003). Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
3. "D.O.A. To Rock Toronto International Film Festival". PunkOiUK. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
4. "D.O.A.". punknews.org. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
5. "Black Flag: 1981". Dementlieu Punk Archive. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
6. http://www.btinternet.com/~thisispun...s/4/middle.htm
7. http://www.allmusic.com/cg/amg.dll?p...0:fbfexqw5ldae
8. "Playlists and Archives for Pat Duncan". WFMU. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
9. "Tim Sommer". Beastiemania.com. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
10. "A short history of Kraut". Liner Notes from Complete Studio Recordings 1982-1986. Retrieved on December 22, 2006.
11. http://www.chips-tv.com/wiki/index.p...e_of_the_Bands
12. Harrington, Joe S. (2002). Sonic Cool: The Life & Death of Rock 'n' Roll (Milwaukee, Wisc.: Hal Leonard). ISBN 0-634-02861-8, p. 388
13. Reynolds, Simon (2005). Rip It Up and Start Again: Post Punk 1978–1984 (London and New York: Faber and Faber). ISBN 0-571-21569-6, pp. 460-467
14. Azerrad, Michael (2001). Our Band Could Be Your Life (New York: Little, Brown). ISBN 0-316-78753-1, p. 419

[edit] References

* Going Underground: American Punk 1979-1992 (George Hurchalla, Zuo Press, 2005)
* Smash the State: A Discography of Canadian Punk, 1977-92 (Frank Manley, No Exit, 1993), ISBN 0-9696631-0-2

[edit] External links

* KFTH An online hardcore discography
* The Punk Vault History of punk and hardcore
* Scanner zine Interview with 'Going Underground' author, George Hurchalla from 2006
* Hardcore punk! A hardcore punk community with several videos and demos of hardcore punk bands.

Hardcore punk
Anarcho-punk - Christian hardcore - Crust punk - D-beat - Emo - Funkcore - Grindcore - Hatecore - Melodic hardcore - Metalcore - Nazi punk - Oi! - Post-hardcore - Powerviolence - Punk rock - Queercore - Rock Against Communism - Ska-core - Skate punk - Streetpunk - Taqwacore- Thrash metal - Thrashcore - UK82 -Youth crew
Regional Scenes
Australia - Brazil - Canada - Italy - Greece - Japan - Scandinavia - South Wales - Umeå - Yugoslavia

United States: Boston - California - Chicago - Detroit - Minneapolis - New Jersey - New York - North Carolina - Phoenix - DC
Other topics
DIY ethic - Hardcore bands - Hardcore dancing - Hardline - Punk ideologies - Second wave punk musicians - Straight edge
Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardcore_punk"

Categories: Articles lacking reliable references from May 2007 | Articles with unsourced statements since April 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Articles with unsourced statements since March 2007 | Articles that may contain original research | NPOV disputes from June 2007 | Articles with unsourced statements since February 2007 | Hardcore punk | Punk genres
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Hardcore wrestling is a form of professional wrestling that eschews traditional concepts of match rules in favor of matches that take place in unusual environments, using foreign objects that are not normally permitted. Although hardcore wrestling is a staple among some wrestling promotions, where they are used at the climaxes of feuds, some promotions (such as Big Japan Pro Wrestling and Combat Zone Wrestling) specialized in hardcore wrestling, with many matches performed in this manner.

Hardcore wrestling became acknowledged as a major wrestling style first in Japan with promotions such as FMW and W*ING. It then became successful in America with Extreme Championship Wrestling. The World Wrestling Federation capitalizing on the success and introduced the WWF Hardcore Championship. The WWF soon began to turn the matches into comedy skits, illustrating the ridiculousness they involved. Hardcore is in sound contrast to traditional mat-based wrestling, where solid technical skills are preferred over stuntwork, blood, and sheer shock value.

The term garbage wrestling is attributed to Japanese wrestler Giant Baba who used it originally to describe a style of wrestling which required little wrestling athletic ability and often involved no wrestling at all, which is rather common in much of hardcore wrestling. Some in the United States consider it a derogatory term.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 Rules
* 2 Common weapons
* 3 Hardcore wrestlers
o 3.1 Men
+ 3.1.1 Japanese wrestlers
+ 3.1.2 American and international wrestlers
+ 3.1.3 Mexican wrestlers
o 3.2 Women
+ 3.2.1 Japanese wrestlers
+ 3.2.2 American and international wrestlers
* 4 Hardcore championship
* 5 Hardcore wrestling promotions
* 6 Criticism
* 7 See also

[edit] Rules

The main rule behind hardcore can have various connotations. Thus, hardcore wrestling is often separated into distinct "levels" based on the graphic nature of the match:

* A 24/7 Title Match describes a situation where a hardcore wrestler must defend the title at all times. The match (and the title) can be won by pinfall at any time and in any place in the presence of a referee. The match has no fixed location, timeframe or even opponent. This is one of the most severe forms of hardcore match given its unpredictablility. This was initially a self-imposed stipulation of Crash Holly's WWE Hardcore Championship but afterward became a general rule of the title. During the time Crash defended his title, he did so in such locations as his hotel room, at the airport and even at the circus.
* A No Disqualification match tends to be less severe, with action taking place mostly inside the ring. Usage of foreign objects is typically minimal, with run-ins (another form of disqualification) being frequently used. The match is often contested between valets (where they may lack wrestling skills), or between a wrestler and a valet (in which a wrestler is expected to run-in and defend their valets). Because of the low-key nature, few consider a no-disqualification match as hardcore, although there is no semantic difference.
* A Deathmatch tends to be the most severe, with a heavy emphasis on the usage of foreign objects to induce bleeding. The types of foreign objects and the nature of the foreign objects are used so as to be extremely graphic and violent in nature. In more recent years, some state athletic commissions in the US have cracked down on the types and frequency of weapons used in these matches.
* A Hardcore match tends to be somewhere in between, with emphasis on the brutality of the attacks and the extreme physical toll on the wrestlers involved.
* Combat Zone Wrestling's Cage of Death, which is held yearly, implements the use of multiple weapons attached to the cage walls. The usual weapons are there, as are unusual ones, such as weedwhackers.

Because of the nature of hardcore wrestling, hardcore matches are often remembered for their dangerous spots (to the point that some deride it as "spotfests") rather than their actual outcome. The hardcore style has even extended to non-hardcore matches (that is, matches with disqualifications), especially into those where disqualifications are uncommon, where the rules allow or encourage the use of certain foreign objects, or where the rules of the match are ambiguous with regards to disqualification. It is not uncommon to have certain types of matches be no-disqualification affairs to avoid the issue of dealing with suspension of disbelief.

[edit] Common weapons

Hardcore matches tend to emphasize the use of certain weapons or the physical toll on the wrestlers, and thus many euphemisms for these matches are employed. (However, the almost kayfabe-breaking accessibility of some of these weapons -- often under the ring -- to wrestlers has led to the noun "plunder" in reference to them.) For example, Street Fights and Bunkhouse Brawls are hardcore-style matches which emphasize that wrestlers need not be in typical wrestling gear when they are battling, while the No Holds Barred match emphasizes the no-disqualification rule. In World Wrestling Entertainment, Extreme rules matches are hardcore-style matches that emphasized the spirit of its former competitor, Extreme Championship Wrestling. Other euphemisms, such as the Good Housekeeping match and Full Metal Mayhem, emphasize the use of certain foreign objects as being legal (the former with kitchen implements, and the latter with metallic objects). In a Fans Bring the Weapons match, wrestlers fight with "weapons" that members of the audience bring to the venue. An Anus Explosion Deathmatch was an FMW special deathmatch where the loser or losing team were abused either by objects or fireworks.

There are several weapons that are used commonly in deathmatch wrestling:

* Fluorescent light tubes
* Barbed wire
* Fire
* Thumbtacks
* Staple gun
* Broken Glass
* Steel folding chair
* Table
* Ladder
* Mousetrap
* Beds of spikes nails
* Barbed wire Baseball Bats
* Barbed wire two-by-four
* Tables
* Barbed Wire
* Thumbtack Bats
* Trash Cans
* Weed whacker
* Road/Street signs
* Kendo sticks/Singapore canes
* Space heater wrapped in barbed wire
* Cacti
* Tank of Scorpions
* Tank of Piranhas
* Tank of Hermit Crabs
* Tank of Snakes (non-venomous)
* Salt, Lemon Juice, boiling concentrated sulphuric acid, hydroflouric acid (to intensify pain on open wounds)
* Razor wire
* Electric tazers
* Meat hooks
* Lobsters
* Lead Pipes
* Razorblade boards
* Chains
* Knives
* Scissors
* Chainsaws
* Cars
* Drills
* Hammer/Sledgehammer
* Cans
* Screwdriver
* Guitar
* Sink
* Handcuffs (to tie the opponent to ropes)
* Chairs
* Crutches
* Cheese graters
* Televisions
* forks
* beer bottles
* Golf club
* Light bulbs
* Shovel
* Cinder blocks
* Pens
* Frying pan
* Wires connected to 30kV overhead lines

[edit] Hardcore wrestlers

Many well-known deathmatch wrestlers are from Japan. In addition, most American wrestlers who participated in deathmatches made their mark in Japan.

[edit] Men

[edit] Japanese wrestlers

* Mr Pogo (deathmatch)
* Tarzan Goto
* Keiji Takayama (Gedo)
* Shoji Akiyoshi (Jado)
* Masato Tanaka (deathmatch)
* Survival Tobita
* Hayabusa (deathmatch)
* Tomoaki Honma (deathmatch)
* Atsushi Onita (The Great Nita) (deathmatch)
* Ryuji Ito (deathmatch)
* Jun Kasai (deathmatch)
* Shadow WX (deathmatch)
* Mokujin Ken (Ken the Box) (deathmatch)
* Ryuji Yamakawa (deathmatch)
* Takashi Sasaki (deathmatch)
* Naoki "Jaki" Numazawa (deathmatch)
* GYAOPPI (deathmatch)
* Kintaro Kanemura(deathmatch)
* Yoshihiro Tajiri
* Shoji Nakamaki (deathmatch)
* BADBOY Hido (deathmatch)
* Apeman Vargon
* Abdullah Kobayashi (deathmatch)
* Mitsuhiro "Mr. Danger" Matsunaga (deathmatch)
* Mr. Gannosuke (deathmatch)
* Hiroshi Ono (deathmatch)
* Togi Makabe (deathmatch)
* Hisakatsu Oya
* Koji Nakagawa (GOEMON)
* Keiji Mutoh (The Great Muta)

[edit] American and international wrestlers

* Vampiro
* Supreme
* Terry Gordy
* Bam Bam Bigelow
* Tiger Jeet Singh
* The Headhunters
* Wifebeater (deathmatch)
* Homeless Jimmy (Tournament of Death)
* Leatherface (deathmatch)
* Necro Butcher (deathmatch)
* Crash Holly (22-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Hardcore Holly (6-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Tazz (2-times ECW World Champion)
* Nick Mondo (deathmatch)
* Shaggy 2 Dope
* Ruckus
* "Hardcore Homie"The Rude Boy[1]
* Mick Foley (King of the deathmatch, first WWF/E Hardcore Champion)
* Vic Grimes
* Rob Van Dam
* Sabu
* The Sandman
* Tommy Dreamer
* Raven (27-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Stevie Richards (22-time WWE Hardcore Champion)
* Rhyno
* Balls Mahoney
* Spike Dudley
* Bubba Ray Dudley
* D-Von Dudley
* Axl Rotten
* New Jack
* Terry Funk(deathmatch)
* The Moondogs
* B.J. Whitmer
* "The Monster" Abyss
* Ian Rotten (deathmatch)
* John Zandig (deathmatch)
* The Messiah (deathmatch)
* Nick Gage (deathmatch)
* Justice Pain (deathmatch)
* Lobo (deathmatch)
* Madman Pondo (deathmatch)
* Toby Klein (deathmatch)
* Corporal Robinson (deathmatch)
* Drake Younger (deathmatch)
* The Sheik
* Flash Flanagan (deathmatch)
* Abdullah the Butcher
* John Kronus
* Brian Lee
* Mike Awesome
* Mikey Whipwreck
* J.C. Bailey
* Nate Hatred
* Al Snow
* CW Anderson
* Steve Corino
* Kid Kash
* "The Sadistic Artist" Lil' Hearse
* Latin American Exchange
* Cursed

[edit] Mexican wrestlers

* Psicosis
* Super Crazy
* Angel
* Halloween
* Mr. Aguila
* Crazy Boy
* Joe Lider
* Damian 666
* Xtreme Tiger
* Kid Kaos
* Shiryu Dragon
* Shenky
* Amazing Kid
* Morvius
* Hellhammer
* X-Rider
* Slade
* Nicho el Millonario
* Nightmare
* Dralion
* Lord Byron
* Sickboy
* Insane
* Xtreme Dragon
* Mayhem
* Erick Snake
* Vertigo
* Skam13
* Murder Angel
* Furor
* Titanik
* Golden Boy
* Azteca Warrior
* Galactar
* Black Soul
* Beto Alcala
* Morvius
* Marrullero
* Simbolo
* Voltaje Negro

[edit] Women

[edit] Japanese wrestlers

* Combat Toyoda
* Shark Tsuchiya
* Megumi Kudo
* Bad Nurse Nakamura
* Miwa Sato
* Mayumi Ozaki
* Crusher Maedomari
* Yukie Nabeno

[edit] American and international wrestlers

* Beastie the Road Warrior
* Mickie Knuckles
* LuFisto
* Princesa Sugei
* El Santo Tribute: Dark Angel
* Nikki Roxx
* Luna
* Beulah McGillicutty

[edit] Hardcore championship

In promotions where Hardcore wrestling is present, a Hardcore title may come into exsistence. This form of title is defended under hardcore rules, and title changes are frequent. Some hardcore titles may have their own unique rules. For example, the WWE Hardcore Championship was defended under 24/7 rules, meaning it could be defended and won at anytime, provided a referee was present to make the pinfall. The OVW Hardcore Championship had a trashcan passed from wrestler to wrestler rather than a belt. The GHC Openweight Hardcore Championship has a unique stipulation in that if the challenger survives 15 minutes, he wins the match and the title. Some Hardcore titles *******:

* WWE Hardcore Championship: 1998-2002, 2006
* WCW Hardcore Championship: 1999-2000
* BJW Death Match Championship (Japan): 1998-Present
* BJW Eight Man Scramble Championship (Japan) : 1999
* BJW Big Authorization Death Match Championship (Japan)
* BJW Barbed Wire Street Fight Six Man Tag Team Title (Japan)
* JCW Juggalo Championship : 1999-Present
* GHC Openweight Hardcore Championship (Japan): 2004-Present
* BWA Hardcore Championship: 2002-Present [2]
* RCW Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* IPW Hardcore Championship [3]
* PWU Hardcore Championship [4]
* FOW Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* CPW Hardcore Championship [5]
* TNW Hardcore Championship [6]
* TCW Hardcore Championship [7]
* WXw Hardcore Championship
* WZW Hardcore Championship [8]
* NCW Hardcore Championship [9]
* CWA Hardcore Championship[citation needed]
* NWL Hardcore Championship: 2000- [10]
* IHW Hardcore Championship: 1999-Present[citation needed]
* ECCW/NWA Pacific Northwest Hardcore Championship 1999-present
* FMW Brass Knuckles Title (Japan): 1990-1999
* FMW Independent Championship (Japan): 1996-1999
* IWA Hardcore Championship (Puerto Rico): 2000-Present
* CZW Ultraviolent Underground Championship 2005-Present
* CZW/NWA Intrapromotional Hardcore Championship: 1999
* XPW World Heavyweight Championship: 1999-2002
* WEW Hardcore Championship (Japan): 1999-2001
* WWC Hardcore Championship (Puerto Rico): 1999-2001
* NWA Texas Hardcore Championship: 1999-2001 [11]
* CWA Hardcore Championship [12]
* OVW Hardcore Championship: 2000-2001
* WWA Hardcore Championship: 2001-2002
* WPW Hardcore Championship: 1999-Present [13]
* Saitama Pro Wrestling Company Monster Attack Champion (Japan)
* Lucha Libre Feminil (LLF) Extreme Championship
* BWF Hardcore Championship [14]
* UCW Hardcore Championship [15]
* World Brass Knuckles Championship (mainly used in various Southern-based wrestling promotions)

[edit] Hardcore wrestling promotions

* Big Japan Pro Wrestling
* Nueva Generacion Extrema(NGX) (Mexico)
* Orden de Lucha Extrema(OLX) (Mexico)
* Combat Zone Wrestling (CZW)
* NWA: Extreme Canadian Championship Wrestling (ECCW)
* Extreme Championship Wrestling (ECW) — now defunct, though has been revived as a brand for World Wrestling Entertainment
* Frontier Martial Arts Wrestling (FMW) — now defunct
* International Wrestling Syndicate
* Insane Hardcore Wrestling (IHW)[citation needed]
* Psychotic Wrestling Alliance UK [16]
* Saitama Pro Wrestling Company (SPWC) (Japan)
* International Wrestling Association of Japan — now defunct
* Pro Pain Pro Wrestling (3PW) — now defunct
* UWA/PWA Hardcore Wrestling
* W*ING — now defunct
* Xtreme Latin American Wrestling (XLAW) (Mexico)[citation needed]
* Xtreme Pro Wrestling (XPW) — now defunct
* Mid American Wrestling (Occasionally)
* IWA Japan
* IWA East Coast
* IWA Deep South
* IWA Mid South

[edit] Criticism

Many fans of traditional professional wrestling, or simply wrestling in general, find the pure hardcore style appalling and unworthy of the title of professional wrestling, considering it little more than glorified streetfighting with weapons. Aside from Giant Baba coining the term "garbage wrestling" (which is rather characteristic, as many hardcore matches start and/or end with garbage items filling the ring), multi-time World Champion Ric Flair has also criticized exclusively hardcore performers like Mick Foley of being "glorified stuntmen" due to the radical spots he has performed throughout his career combined with his self-admitted lack of ability to do any other sort of match in the ring.[17] The critics of hardcore wrestling do not necessarily reject the idea of hardcore matches or spots in professional wrestling. What they react most negatively to is poor or unskilled wrestlers incapable of wrestling any other style making careers out of being hardcore wrestlers.

The hardcore wrestling style also tended to burn itself out if used too much. Each spotfest raised expectations for the next one leading to excess and eventually self-parody. In the World Wrestling Federation, the concept of hardcore wrestling became by company plan a parody of itself. Not long after the birth of the WWF Hardcore Championship, and the 24/7 rule it constituted, the title became the subject of comedic scenarios and exchanged hands more than any other championship, quickly degrading whatever value it had as a championship belt. A similar event took place in World Championship Wrestling with Norman Smiley and manager Jimmy Hart approaching hardcore bouts, suited up in football gear and Medieval plate armor, while pushing shopping carts filled with foreign objects to the ring.

In terms of ring psychology, many fans consider the worst examples of hardcore wrestling to be "spotfests" and claim that the matches have no direction. This is attributed to the idea that they rely heavily on drastic spots with no transition between them aside from often unrealistically setting up the next spot and with little concern over the actual result of the match. Matches may find themselves in awkward looking moments due to the difficulty in setting up a highly dangerous spot, as evident when New Jack and Vic Grimes clinched onto one another, hesitantly preparing to fall off a 20-foot scaffold. The spot resulted in both men falling to the concrete floor and New Jack receiving both brain damage and permanent blindness in his right eye.

Performance which takes place between these major spots is often subject to elementary brawling or usage of less "damaging" weapons like a crutch or flimsy aluminum tray and, as aforementioned, may be restricted to obscure situations of spot preparation. This is in stark contrast to conventional wrestling which requires a practice and technique to accomplish the various stages of a match and maintain the effect of a real battle.

The "anything goes" ruling may also require an even greater suspension of disbelief than mat wrestling due to the fact that, in kayfabe, the performers may use absolutely any items they choose as weapons. The matches can fall into almost cartoonish levels of violence where weapons that should cause serious injury in the real world do no harm at all. They also often avoid weapons that could help win a match in favor of those that allow for the theatrical suffering or mutilation of their opponent such as a staple gun, broken glass, cacti, or even small biting animals. Many such elements are embellished even further in the "deathmatch" style virtually unseen in mainstream western promotions, with heavy emphasis on blood, mutilation, and shock value. These elements introduce perhaps a much darker side to the world of professional wrestling with its constant aim to please fans.

[edit] See also

* Backyard Wrestling
* List of professional wrestling styles

Retrieved from "http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hardcore_wrestling"

Categories: Articles lacking sources from February 2007 | All articles lacking sources | Articles with unsourced statements since March 2007 | All articles with unsourced statements | Professional wrestling | Professional wrestling genres
Nah, neither of those.

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 01:16 PM   #40
Luke de Spa
someone more...punk rock?
 
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troll!

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 01:18 PM   #41
GlasgowKiss
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Thanks for helping out tho LDS, you are a real asset to the community.

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 01:21 PM   #42
Luke de Spa
someone more...punk rock?
 
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one does one's best

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 06:06 PM   #43
davin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GlasgowKiss
Thanks for helping out tho LDS, you are a real asset to the community.
yea LDS, you put the "cess" in cesspool....

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 06:08 PM   #44
exactlythesame
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davin
yea LDS, you put the "cess" in cesspool....
Aww, so sweet.

 
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Old 06-10-2007, 06:11 PM   #45
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thanks btw, to all those who PM'd me article and news links.

 
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Old 06-23-2007, 10:46 PM   #46
davin
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Quote:
Originally Posted by standing
I completely respect your call if you don't wanna ******* it. But I really consider the release rather official and includible. In its defense: A) It was officially released in a way that allowed the band to profit from it. B) They probably could have released it physically, but they are living out gatmog, and they had to do something to mirror zero's entire back catalogue being released on the new z-disc format. C) I can't give you a direct quote, but I read in either a billy or jimmy interview once that those two directly picked the songs to be *******d in this release. D) Not including it because it isn't physically released is not a forward-thinking call. That is probably just the future of music. (Same with movie rentals: Netflix will one day just stream a movie to you for the rental price.). Like, What if spfc was formed before cds? Would only cassette releases be *******d? I would bet that 35 years from now there will be no physically released music. So we have to start including official digital releases.
Again, I COMPLETELY respect your decision, just throwing in my 2-cents.
ps- some may think my 35 year prediction is exaggerated. But if you look at what downloadable music has done to album sales AND most people's attention spans for music from a single artist in just (maybe) 15 years, I think it's completely believable that 35 more years of this progression could completely do in printed music.
its been added. http://www.spfc.org/songs-releases/d...?discog_id=208

 
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Old 06-23-2007, 11:35 PM   #47
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do u have lost tapes 94 info/ i cant find shit

 
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Old 06-24-2007, 04:21 AM   #48
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"I ain't feelin that shit man you gotta take that shit back to the studio or somethin."

 
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Old 06-24-2007, 08:11 AM   #49
standing
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davin

NNNICE entry! Thanks!

 
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Old 06-24-2007, 08:37 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davin
but thanks for the kind words...we do it out of love...



http://www.my-mistake.net/infinitepics/band/band366.jpg

[email protected] James

I wonder where Jimmy got his inspiration...

http://i178.photobucket.com/albums/w...-highway-2.jpg

someone photoshop that

 
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