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-   -   Hey, can we have a rolling What Are You Reading thread? (http://forums.netphoria.org/showthread.php?t=186757)

Disco King 01-28-2021 12:59 PM

I still haven't noticed it.

Cool As Ice Cream 01-28-2021 02:15 PM

thank you for sharing that with the rest of us. you will be in my thoughts and prayers.

ovary 01-28-2021 08:56 PM

everybody, hold your gamestop stock. DO NOT SELL!!!

MyOneAndOnly 01-28-2021 09:41 PM

Ameritrade won't let me

Disco King 01-28-2021 10:47 PM


run2pee 01-28-2021 10:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alice (Post 4572676)
I mean just take a look at this sentence:

"He brushed past us, and did not interrupt what he was saying to her, but gave us, out of the corner of his blue eye, a little sign which began and ended, so to speak, inside his eyelids and which, as it did not involve the least movement of his facial muscles, managed to pass quite unperceived by the lady; but, striving to compensate by the intensity of his feelings for the somewhat restricted field in which they had to find expression, he made that blue chink which was set apart for us sparkle with all the zest of an affability that went far beyond mere playfulness, almost touched the border-line of roguery; he subtilised the refinements of good-fellowship into a wink of connivance, a hint, a hidden meaning, a secret understanding, all the mysteries of complicity, and finally elevated his assurances of friendship to the level of protestations of affection, even of a declaration of love, lighting up for us alone, with a secret and languid flame invisible to the chantelaine, an enamoured pupil in a countenance of ice."

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alice (Post 4572677)
Or these ones:

"I would stop by the table, where the kitchen-maid had shelled them, to inspect the platoon of peas, drawn up in ranks and numbered, like little green marbles, ready for a game; but what most enraptured me were the asparagus, tinged with ultramarine and pink which shaded off from their heads, finely stippled in mauve and azure, through a series of imperceptible gradations to their white feetóstill trained a little by the soil of their garden-bedówith an iridescence that was not of this world. I felt that these celestial hues indicated the presence of exquisite creatures who had been pleased to assume vegetable form and who, through the disguise of their firm, comestible flesh, allowed me to discern in this radiance of earliest dawn, these hinted rainbows, these blue evening shades, that precious quality which I should recognise again when, all night long after a dinner at which I'd partaken of them, they played (lyrical and coarse in their jesting as the fairies in Shakespeare's Dream) at transforming my chamber pot into a vase of aromatic perfume."

Quote:

Originally Posted by wHATcOLOR (Post 4573338)
im not trying to be contrarian but i genuinely hated reading this "sentence"

Can sympathize with both of u here

Certainly used to come from the school of oh my gosh those are some damn fine pretty words to describe a thing in such minute detail that holy smokes itís transportive af and how do they even do it and tickle my fancy so

10 years later, doing a job where i read and write for bureaucrats, and i have no tolerance left for anything remotely flowery. Itís hard facts written as clearly and succinctly as possible or gtfo. Nowadays im more inclined to marvel at a paragraph that efficiently/expertly summarizes years of info into a meaningful, actionable chunk, than a paragraph that examines and unpacks the minutia of the minutes of life

So, itís like, yeah

run2pee 01-28-2021 11:02 PM

One author for me that’s survived the tectonic shift in my reading appetites is david Foster Wallace. Not saying i can read all his stuff. But when i do it’s a nice balance b/w flowery/fantastical and hard/efficient

buzzard 01-28-2021 11:34 PM

I often find that run-on sentences more closely resemble dialogue or even thoughts and can be pretty effective in storytelling where correct grammar or short sentences in general might inhibit the piece. Concision has its place, too, though just as often to complement as substitute.

run2pee 01-28-2021 11:59 PM

Thing is when u can be efficient but also artful. That’s the trick isn’t it. Blow my mind with an expertly crafted shimmering dose of simplicity/clarity. But not like in a western chauvinist vs drunken hemingway way, cause that sucks too.

Just, like. Tell me what u fucken mean, u dicks

Alice 01-29-2021 01:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Run To Me (Post 4573369)
Can sympathize with both of u here

Certainly used to come from the school of oh my gosh those are some damn fine pretty words to describe a thing in such minute detail that holy smokes itís transportive af and how do they even do it and tickle my fancy so

10 years later, doing a job where i read and write for bureaucrats, and i have no tolerance left for anything remotely flowery. Itís hard facts written as clearly and succinctly as possible or gtfo. Nowadays im more inclined to marvel at a paragraph that efficiently/expertly summarizes years of info into a meaningful, actionable chunk, than a paragraph that examines and unpacks the minutia of the minutes of life

So, itís like, yeah

I definitely have to be in the mood for someone who writes like Proust and I get why he wouldn't be for everyone but there is room for both, in my heart

Alice 01-29-2021 02:01 PM

Cormac McCarthy doesn't like Proust either. Speaking of which I've been making my way through the short stories of Breece D'J Pancake and he sure does make me wistful. Makes me miss the south too, which I suppose I knew would come with time

Alice 01-29-2021 02:03 PM

The rain slows, and for a long time I sit watching the blue chicory swaying beside the road. I think of all the people I know who left these hills. Only Jim and Pop came back to the land, worked it.
“Lookee at the willow-wisps.” Mom points to the hills.
The rain trickles, and as it seeps in to cool the ground, a fog rises. The fog curls little ghosts into the branches and gullies. The sun tries to sift through this mist, but is only a tarnished brown splotch in the pinkish sky. Wherever the fog is, the light is a burnished orange.
“Can’t recall the name Pop gave it,” I say.
The colors shift, trade tones.
“He had some funny names all right. Called a tomcat a ‘pussy scat.’ ”
I think back. “Cornflakes were ‘pone-rakes,’ and a chicken was a ‘sick-un.’ ”
We laugh.
“Well,” she says, “he’ll always be a part of us.”
The glommy paint on the chair arm packs under my fingernails. I think how she could foul up a free lunch.
Ginny honks again from the main road. I stand up to go in, but I hold the screen, look for something to say.
“I ain’t going to live in Akron,” I say.
“An’ just where you gonna live, Mister?”
“I don’t know.”
She starts up with her fan again.
“Me and Ginny’s going low-riding,” I say.
She won’t look at me. “Get in early. Mr. Trent don’t keep no late hours for no beer drinkers.”
The house is quiet, and I can hear her out there sniffling. But what to hell can I do about it? I hurry to wash the smell of turkle from my hands. I shake all over while the water flows down. I talked back. I’ve never talked back. I’m scared, but I stop shaking. Ginny can’t see me shaking. I just walk out to the road without ever looking back to the porch.

Alice 01-29-2021 02:03 PM

Perhaps this is more to the liking of you unwashed masses? Hmm?

FoolofaTook 01-29-2021 03:16 PM


ovary 01-29-2021 03:43 PM

that is one of my favorite stories. captures how the Appalachian mountains make you feel like all of time and history are compressed into the electric air

i also like the one with the serial killer pig farmer. pig guys are weird

Alice 01-29-2021 03:51 PM

He's so good. Been meaning to read him for a while and just finally got around to it. Haven't got to the pig farmer yet but yeah he's great at distilling the feel of that weirdo corner of the country into tight, painfully sad little stories. In the Dry is another one I really loved. That one and The Honored Dead both have this really cool looping feel to them where as soon as you finish you want to start at the beginning again and when you do you pick up the pieces you missed the first time around with context you only could have gained from reading it through once before

Alice 01-29-2021 03:52 PM

Got any similar recommendations? I can already tell his body of work is going to be over for me too soon and I'll be left wanting more. Ever read any Pickney Benedict?

ovary 01-29-2021 04:21 PM

looping is a good word to describe pancake's stories pacing-wise too. i think he was working on a novel when he killed himself but none of it's been published. think he was 27 when he did it like a rock star

i just read "Honey From the Lion" by Mathew Neil Null, which was great. Ann Pancake (no relation) writes similar stories to Breece. I like Breece better tho.

Shadaloo 02-01-2021 08:59 PM

Just finished Lovecraft County

Interesting enough premise but it ultimately didn't say or do much of anything apart from waggle its finger and remind us that racism is bad. Kinda disappointing in that regard. I was hoping for more in the way of actual commentary on how to reconcileor come to terms with the fact that someone who's work you admire is a fucking monster, but nope

Got a few more on my reading pile. Debating between Ursula K. Le Guin's Lathe Of Heaven, a Prince biography, some stories inspired by David Lynch.

Alice 02-05-2021 08:32 PM



Was thinking of rereading one of his novels but I'm doing this instead

slunken 02-05-2021 08:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Alice (Post 4574103)


Was thinking of rereading one of his novels but I'm doing this instead

those are better than his novels imo

ovary 02-05-2021 09:31 PM

sounds like you can't handle a full dose of the faulk bro.

Alice 02-05-2021 09:35 PM

That’s a hell of a claim. His novels are among my favorites. But having just reread Barn Burning I can believe that someone would feel this way. It’s the only one of his short stories I’ve read before and it’s brutal. Last time I read it was in high school and I definitely didn’t appreciate it like I do now. Looking forward to the rest. I wish they were in chronological order tho

Alice 02-05-2021 09:37 PM

It’s hard to imagine his short stories topping As I Lay Dying or The Sound and the Fury for me at at least

Alice 02-05-2021 09:37 PM

But then again I’m due for a reread on both of those

Alice 02-05-2021 09:40 PM

Oh shit was that a callout

Alice 02-05-2021 09:41 PM

Either of you ever read Absolom? That’s the last of his big ones I haven’t got to

ovary 02-05-2021 09:47 PM

absalom absalom and go down moses are my favs. didnt really like sound and the fury. as i lay is the only major one i havent read. absalom is like the best as a novel i think and go down moses is his best writing IMO. what is your take on isaac in moses? hero or douche?

Alice 02-05-2021 09:53 PM

I thought that was a shorts collection too?

Alice 02-05-2021 09:54 PM

Either way I haven’t read it yet. Perhaps I’ve misspoken


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