Netphoria Message Board

Netphoria Message Board (http://forums.netphoria.org/index.php)
-   Music News and Discussion (http://forums.netphoria.org/forumdisplay.php?f=11)
-   -   Guitar Playing and gear thread (http://forums.netphoria.org/showthread.php?t=181491)

he/she/it 05-06-2016 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slunken (Post 4261476)
1. Don't most advanced delays have a tone knob where you can control the darkness/brightness of the delay? I know the DD-20 has one.

2. Use some Deoxit for the pedal, as suggested. It's made for electronic/instrument gear. Personally I wouldn't go messing about with anything else.

Bomb The Moon isn't clear on where the squeak is coming from, but Deoxit is for cleaning electronic and metal parts, clearing rust, making contacts more clean and direct.

An expression pedal's hinge comes greased, and a squeaky hinge is probably because it needs re-greasing. Lithium grease should take care of that. Just make sure to not get it on the circuitry.

If it isn't the hinge on the pedal, but is joints of the pedal enclosure, then maybe Deoxit would be better.

Bomb The Moon 05-07-2016 08:37 AM

the squeak is coming from the hinges, when using expression pedal. or perhaps a family of mice living inside.

thanks for the ideas. :rock_on:

Disco King 05-07-2016 01:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by soniclovenoize (Post 4261471)
Not as great. Maybe upgrade to the Memory Man for a slapback.

I see. Thanks!

Quote:

Originally Posted by slunken (Post 4261476)
1. Don't most advanced delays have a tone knob where you can control the darkness/brightness of the delay? I know the DD-20 has one.

I dunno, but the ones in the price range I was looking at don't tend to have one.

teh b0lly!!1 05-07-2016 01:58 PM

in my wildest, most secret dreams, somebody loves me unconditionally and i own a binson echorec

Disco King 05-11-2016 04:59 AM

Looks like a cool machine. It looks like Catalinbread tried to replicate it in a pedal. Have you seen it?
http://www.catalinbread.com/product/echorec/


I was just recording a rough sketch of the vocals for a song I'm writing (just a bunch of nonsense placeholder lyrics for now). I'm not confident in my voice, and I noticed I was kind of too embarrassed to sing all that clearly because I wasn't sure if anybody could hear me (I live in a shitty apartment and my window faces the parking lot and I can always hear idiots out there), so I was pretty much whispering. I feel like I can't improve my vocals because in order to do that, I need to practice, and I don't like practicing because there's the chance somebody could hear me. It's a feedback loop.

Also, I don't know much about mixing. I only recorded a single acoustic guitar and two vocal tracks, but it was hard for me to have them all sit comfortably in their own spaces in the mix. Doesn't help that my vocals were already very blended into the guitar due to the whispery-ness.

Listening to myself is really cringey and it usually forces me to stop and give up but I tried to push through it this time.

Elphenor 05-11-2016 08:04 AM

this is not a singing thread tho

Disco King 05-11-2016 01:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elphenor (Post 4262163)
this is not a singing thread tho

But I was singing over a guitar so

Also, I didn't want to put this in the "thread for posting your musics" because I wasn't actually posting my musics, just complaining about how my musics is a shit

Quote:

Originally Posted by Poots (Post 4262176)
try taking one vocal and cutting out all the high and middle frequencies leaving a muffled low end mess. Pan that hard left. Then take the other vocal and take all the lows and mids, for a high end tweeter-destroying vocal. Pan that hard left as well. Then take the acoustic guitar and take out all the highs and lows so that it sounds boxy and wooden. Also add heavy studio flanging. Pan hard left. All of these parts will sound like shit by themselves, but they will create an awesome sonic forest for your listeners to get totally lost in.

Thanks bro. Just followed these tips in my latest recording. What I ended up with isn't perfect, but it's definitely an improvement and I think I'm headed in the right direction. I did add my own personal flair by doing this trick I like to do, though. I like to ensure each channel really gives all it's got and goes for that threshold in order to get that square-wave clipping so that I end up with something approximating that beautiful Siamese Dream tone.

Take a listen and tell me what you think.

Elphenor 05-11-2016 02:27 PM

I kind of hate the beach boys I gotta be honest

Why they are so beloved I don't think I'll ever understand

It all reminds me of Christmas music

Run To Me 05-11-2016 04:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elphenor (Post 4262190)
I kind of hate the beach boys I gotta be honest

Why they are so beloved I don't think I'll ever understand

It all reminds me of Christmas music

Elph are you talking Pet Sounds or radio beach boys? If the latter I can forgive. If the former, you need to try it on headphones with some bong hoots. The experience will thoroughly destroy your mind/soul then remake them for the better, I promise

slunken 05-11-2016 08:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elphenor (Post 4262190)
I kind of hate the beach boys I gotta be honest

Why they are so beloved I don't think I'll ever understand

It all reminds me of Christmas music

Research Brian Wilson. I recommend the book "Catch A Wave: The Rise, Fall, and Redemption of the Beach Boys' Brian Wilson".

Brian was a wizard at using found and natural sounds as parts of his compositions (running water, dishes clanging, fire crackling, people chewing, things like that).

I used to feel the same way as you but it wasn't until earlier this year that it finally hit me. This song was my entry point.



Guy was pretty messed up. It might help if you start with the songs he wrote the lyrics to. Lots of heartbreak and longing and all the good stuff that makes for good music, as opposed to "songs about surfing and cars"

soniclovenoize would have much, much more to say on the subject.

Elphenor 05-11-2016 08:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Run To Me (Post 4262198)
Elph are you talking Pet Sounds or radio beach boys? If the latter I can forgive. If the former, you need to try it on headphones with some bong hoots. The experience will thoroughly destroy your mind/soul then remake them for the better, I promise

I tried listening to Pet Sounds and didn't get it sorry man

slunken 05-11-2016 08:55 PM

If you can find a way to separate Brain from the rest of the Boys (which happened within the group) you will be much better off.

Brian Wilson > Beach Boys

Unfortunately he lyrically contributed less and less to every album although Pet Sounds and Smile (Smiley Smile) were his megaliths.

Elphenor 05-11-2016 08:57 PM

Maybe there's hope for me

Idk I won't give up on them yet

slunken 05-11-2016 09:35 PM

For the record I don't revisit it everyday but it's at least worth listening to once or twice with an informed ear.

soniclovenoize 05-12-2016 01:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by slunken (Post 4262219)

soniclovenoize would have much, much more to say on the subject.

Not trying to sound like a dick, but someone who is obsessed with post-punk will most likely not "get" The Beach Boys.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Elphenor (Post 4262229)
I tried listening to Pet Sounds and didn't get it sorry man



Just listen to this. Listen to the lyrics. Then go back and listen to the chord sequence. Then go back and listen to it as a whole, as a production.

If you don't get it, don't bother.

ButtHash 05-12-2016 06:04 PM

A lot of their music has a dark undercurrent to it. Probably has to do with their backstory too. Surf's Up the album rules.




slunken 05-22-2016 01:05 PM

Starting to learn the importance of an engineer. I went through about 20 takes of a certain song and the only thing I could think was "man I wish the vocals were up a bit higher". Find the ones with the best sounding vocals and I think "eh this performance isn't as good as the others". I should have checked these things in between takes instead of just constantly recording until I got a performance I was happy with.

Or like a certain instrumental in 7 takes the best performance has a couple spots were another part could be a tad higher in volume but the others with the best "mixing sound" have booted performances where I completely mess up the ending or something.

I do everything live in real time so it's not like I can go back into a DAW and click a button. I also write and make revisions while recording so take 1 of a song is usually not as evolved as what the final take will be, whether its specific sequences or lyrics or whatever.

I know it happens to everybody but does anybody else have anything to share regarding compromising when choosing takes of your own material? Something other than "choose the one with the best feels, man".

Maybe I should just start to take the time to listen to every playback between performances, or maybe listen to the day's performances as a whole instead of just recording a whole bunch of stuff and then a couple of months later go back through all the audio takes.

I dunno, rambling here.

soniclovenoize 05-22-2016 02:09 PM

Are you not multi-tracking? Are you recording live to like a 2-track stereo channel?

For basic tracks, I always prefer the spontaneity of first or second takes. Anything above four is over-thinking it; walk away from it and rehearse it more. Overdubs, same rules apply but sometimes it takes a few passes to get the right feel. But even then, after many takes, I just walk away and try again from scratch the next day and often nail it right away.

I comp vocals like crazy now though.

slunken 05-22-2016 02:59 PM

No I don't multi-track. Everything is recorded live to a stereo channel. I tend to over-record because when the recorder isn't on I'll often play something I wish was recorded.

I agree about over-thinking it though. Even if I do 20 takes of something more than likely I'll be choosing something in the first 4. What I do (instrumentally) leaves a lot of room for experimentation though, so I like to play around with the recorder running. Sometimes a simple take on the first pass will evolve into something more complex over the course of a day or a month.

soniclovenoize 05-22-2016 05:46 PM

You are mixing looped/FX guitars and vocals, right? If so, I would recommend investing in at least a 4-channel interface, so you at least have the option to drop out a vocal flub over an otherwise good take of your guitar loops. Then you can also take elements of different takes and combine them, Frank Zappa's ideas of xenochrony.

Also, a few years ago I got into Can and I really liked the idea of taking epic, long jams and just editing out the best sections of one long piece and stringing them together as the final 'song'. You could try that, hard edits between different takes... Or maybe a crossfade of the different takes if there's some mixing differences?

I'm playing in a newish project called FM Bells that has evolved into a sort of electro-jazz sort of thing. I can't remember if I've talked about that here, but we've been jamming with an electronic producer who makes live beats and sonic manipulations, with us playing live bass, guitar and saxophone. It's pretty cool, I've never done anything like it. But what's happening is everything is devolving into a droney 20 minute jam. I think it's great, and am pushing to do the Can thing of taking those jams and editing the best pieces and making it a six minute thing, idk. All four of us have a different idea of how to proceed and take these hours upon hours of just jamming and make it something feasible an audience might want to hear...

Here it is if anyone is curious. https://soundcloud.com/soniclovenoiz...c-of-capricorn

slunken 05-22-2016 08:09 PM

The material with vocals is something different than my normal guitar instrumentals. I was just using it as an example. I do a small amount of editing within a track, like you mentioned editing down a super long jam into a more defined piece, but the nature of what I do doesn't allow me to cobble different takes together, unless it's a distinctly different movement.

Idk. Thanks for the replies.

Disco King 06-03-2016 06:02 PM

Finally got my noise gate to work how I want it to. At first I was stupidly putting it at the end of my chain before, because I was like "that way, it'll cut the noise introduced by all my other pedals," but when I did that, if I put the threshold high enough to cut out the noise when my first pedals were on, if I wanted to switch to clean playing, it's be inaudible because the clean signal was lower than the threshold, and I couldn't turn it up without making the noise louder and having to set the threshold up again.

I then realized that most of my noise is coming from the guitar, and is only being amplified by the pedals, so the gate is now in front of the chain, and it's working very well for me. Like, that feeling when there is total silence of maybe just a soft hum, but then you start playing evil fuzzed out bliss, but then you stop playing, and there's silence again. It just feels crisp and right. The worst thing is when you have a modulation pedal on, like a phaser or flanger, and you can hear it phasing through the buzz when you're not playing. I mean, I feel like that could be used for some cool effect, but it's annoying when you don't want any of it.

My problem now, though, is that there seems to be a tradeoff between cutting noise and having crazy long sustain, because as soon as the guitar signal goes below the threshold, it gets cut off with the noise. What do I do if I want both a lack of noise and some good sustain?

I'm guessing the only things I'll be able to do are (1) shield my guitar so that I don't need a noise gate or can set the gate threshold lower, and/or (2), get a compression pedal and set it before the gate, but set it just right so that the threshold is just above the gate's threshold, so that it sustains the guitar signal without boosting the noise.

Are there any other options that don't require buying more shit or doing anything that takes effort though?

Disco King 06-03-2016 06:10 PM

Although sometimes I like doing this cool thing where I let a note or chord sustain and wait for it to fade back into the noise and pretend to be a rockstar in my room

slunken 06-04-2016 12:26 PM

Seems a bit goofy to be using a noise gate for playing at bedroom volume. Are you sure you just don't have a ground hum?

teh b0lly!!1 06-04-2016 09:50 PM

lol how is it goofy

the second you turn on a fuzz pedal you're going to have shitloads of noise every time you're not playing, wether you're playing with earphones or to a crowd of 10,000 people


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 08:49 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Smashing Pumpkins, Alternative Music
& General Discussion Message Board and Forums
www.netphoria.org - Copyright 1998-2020