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Old 12-26-2007, 09:16 PM   #1
Olivier
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Default wikipedia article of your home town

Hemet, California

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemet,_California


some cool facts, some i knew, some I didn't.

-
Hemet Maze Stone. This pictograph, representing a maze, is an outstanding example of the work of prehistoric peoples. It, with 5.75 acres (23,000 m²) of land, was donated to Riverside County as a county park on April 16, 1956 by Mr. and Mrs. Rodger E. Miller.Location: From State Hwy 74, go N 3.2 mi on California Ave to Maze Stone Park, Hemet
(i think i've seen it)

-Each year, the city stages Ramona, formerly known as "The Ramona Pageant," the worlds largest outdoor play, based on Helen Hunt Jackson's novel Ramona.
(always a HUGE thing in town, saw it in 4th grade with a few thousand other kids from around so cal)

-When asked, "Where ya from in the world?" in the 2001 film Spy Game, Brad Pitt's character, Tom Bishop, replies: "Hemet, California"

-In the movie "Almost Famous," the tour bus bears an anachronistic bumper sticker from the 1990s, which says, "Hemet Is Heaven."

-The last chase scene in the movie "The Fast and the Furious" takes place on Hemet's Domenigoni Parkway.
(dad told me that, drives that way every day. hell of a street, it's fast and furious all the time)

-The stable scenes in the movie "Seabiscuit" were filmed at the Hemet Stock Farm.
(tried out as an extra cause my friends were, haha)

notable people:

* James Lafferty, actor and athlete (One Tree Hill)
(went to my high school)
* Dolly Parton, country music singer/songwriter, composer, author, actress and philanthropist.

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:21 PM   #2
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I learned that of July 06 my town had a population of 1,818 people

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:22 PM   #3
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fun fact #584: almost rhymes with helmet!

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:22 PM   #4
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas_City,_Missouri

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:24 PM   #5
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you've got an interesting town. haha.

the second paragraph of my page talks about shuffleboard and the hospital. my town is filled with old fucks.

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:27 PM   #6
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific...%2C_California

Pacific Beach, San Diego, California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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The view south of Crystal Pier



The view north of Crystal Pier


Pacific Beach is a neighborhood of San Diego, bounded by La Jolla to the north, Mission Beach to the south, Interstate 5 and Clairemont to the east, and the Pacific Ocean to the west. While largely populated by surfers and college students, the population is becoming more professional and affluent due to rising property and rental costs. "PB", as it is known as by local residents, is also home to one of San Diego's more popular nightlife, with dozens of bars, cafes, and eateries lining the main east-west street Garnet Avenue and Mission Boulevard, which runs north-south.

Contents

[hide]


[edit] Beaches

Pacific Beach boasts miles of shoreline and beaches along the Pacific Ocean to the west and Mission Bay to the South. The boardwalk overlooking the Pacific Ocean spans from Palisades Park South at Beryl Street in Northern Pacific Beach to Mission Beach, the neighborhood and beach directly to the south. There is also a sidewalk along Mission Bay which runs around Crown Point through Sail Bay and Mission Beach. The boardwalk is typically crowded with pedestrians, cyclists, rollerbladers, and shoppers. The beach scene revolves around Crystal Pier, a large pier and hotel at the west end of Garnet Avenue.



[edit] Alcohol

A one-year ban on drinking alcohol on San Diego’s beaches and coastal parks will go into effect in late December 2007, after the San Diego City Council passed the ban on Monday November 5, 2007 by a 5 to 2 vote.[1] The alcohol ban was passed in response to a beach riot on September 3, 2007 that involved more than 100 beach goers and 70 police officers. In the end, 16 individuals were arrested; two people suffered minor injuries.[2]



[edit] Smoking

Effective August 17th, 2006, after months of legal debating and thoughts of exceptions, the City of San Diego banned smoking at all city beaches and parks. As of the summer of 2007, smoking on the boardwalk is prohibited as well. To help promote a new smoke-free environment, the Surfrider Foundation is installing 30 outdoor ashtrays along Ocean Beach and soon Pacific Beach. Those found smoking on the beach can be fined $250 or more.



[edit] Streets

The primary north-south street running parallel to the beach is Mission Boulevard, with the streets named after late 19th century federal officials, then incrementing in alphabetical order as they move further from the coast: Bayard, Cass, Dawes, Everts, Fanuel, Gresham, Haines, Ingraham, Jewell, Kendall, Lamont, Morrell, Noyes, Olney, Pendelton. Mission Boulevard was formerly Allison Street, being the "A" street of the series.

The east-west streets are named after precious stones and are roughly in alphabetical order from north to south (two of which are officially misspelled):

Other east-west streets also named after stones fall in there, but out of order. These *******: Sapphire, Tourmaline, Opal and Turquoise.

1Despite the fact that Garnet Avenue is surrounded by streets named after other stones, many San Diego residents pronounce it like the surname "Garnette" /gɑrˈnɛt/, instead of the stone "garnet" /ˈgɑr.nɪt/.



[edit] History

Pacific Beach was developed during the boom years of 1886-1888 by D. C. Reed, A. G. Gassen, Charles W. Pauley, R. A. Thomas, and O. S. Hubbell. It was Hubbell who "leared away the grainfields, pitched a tent, mapped out the lots, hired an auctioneer and started to work." To attract people, they built the Race Track and San Diego College of Letters, neither of which survive today. A railway also connected Pacific Beach with downtown San Diego, and was later extended to La Jolla.



[edit] Bars and Nightlife

Pacific Beach is one of the main centers of nightlife in San Diego. Garnet Avenue between Ingraham Street and Mission Blvd. is the main area where bars and restaurants are located. Pacific Beach tends to cater to a younger college- and post-college-oriented crowd, compared to downtown San Diego's Gaslamp District. Dress codes are generally less strict if they are enforced at all.

Some of the larger and more popular bars in Pacific Beach ******* Cabo Cantina, Pacific Beach Bar & Grill, Moondoggies, Tavern At The Beach, Nick's at the Beach, and Typhoon Saloon. There is also a good selection of medium-sized bars and a few smaller local places such as PB Pub, Thrusters, Cass St Bar & Grill, the Tiki House, and The Silver Fox. Most Pacific Beach clubs offering music cater to people in their twenties and early thirties, with DJ's, hip-hop, and live dance music. The notable exception in the Pacific Beach music scene is the Tiki House, which opened in 1980 and caters to an older crowd with live music almost every night. The Tiki typically showcases local acts with original music, and hosted many significant acts before they were big, such as Jewel, the Bastard Sons of Johnny Cash, the Beat Farmers, and other nationally known musicians. Lahaina Beach House, located on the Boardwalk at Reed Street, and Open Bar (on Mission Blvd.) are popular on sunny days.



[edit] External links


 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:33 PM   #7
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Default http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fremantle

Fremantle is a port city in Western Australia, located 19 kilometres (12 mi) southwest of Perth, the state capital, at the mouth of the Swan River on Australia's western coast. It was the first settlement of the Swan River Colonists in 1829. It was declared a city in 1929, and has a population of approximately 26,000.

The city is named after Charles Fremantle, the English naval officer who had pronounced possession of Western Australia and who established the camp at the site. The city contains well preserved buildings and other heritage sites. The Western Australian vernacular diminutive for Fremantle is "Freo".[3]

Geography

Fremantle lies on a series of limestone hills known by the Nyungar people as Booyeembara; the sandplain to the east is Gardoo.[4][5] The original vegetation of the area was mainly Xanthorrhoea and eucalyptus trees, being fired annually (in late spring or summer) by the traditional owners.

Fremantle is subject to weather and climate relative to sea-side communities - to the point that the regular sea breeze is known as the Fremantle Doctor.

The National Hotel, one of the city's historic buildings, was almost destroyed by fire on the night of Sunday, March 11, 2007 - while the inside was gutted, the historic facade was saved and its new owners are working to stabilise the building and restore it so the hotel can operate once more.

The National Trust of Australia have designated the grave of formerAC/DC lead singer Bon Scott a national heritage site, in recognition of the thousands of rock music fans who visit it each year[11].


Fremantle has a broadly mixed-class of professions yet high unemployment (10.2%), multi ethnic population, and an above average proportion of rented dwellings (43%) of which larger than average proportion owned by Homeswest (40.1%).[12] Fremantle supports the Australian Labor Party at both Federal and state elections.[13]

For a town of smaller size Fremantle is very diverse. Only 64% of the population was born in Australia. The largest overseas-born population groups come from the United Kingdom, Italy, New Zealand, Ireland and Germany. There are also sizeable Madeiran, Portuguese and Croatian communities.

Some 57% of the population is Christian, largely Roman Catholic and Anglican.[15]


 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:44 PM   #8
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The town I live in or the town [the suburb?] where I grew up?

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:46 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the antipop
The town I live in or the town [the suburb?] where I grew up?
where you grew up, because if its a fucked up town, that might explain a few things

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:48 PM   #10
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richmond%2C_va

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:52 PM   #11
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actually, technically my hometown would be http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hayward,_California
and i grew up in http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kansas_City,_Kansas

but i posted the city i live in currently (and have for 7 years)

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:55 PM   #12
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I live a block away from "the mormon street." every person i know knows where it is, cause the street is made up of houses upwards of 500,000+. probably a lot upward. no one i know really likes the mormons in my area, unless they are one.


 
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Old 12-26-2007, 09:57 PM   #13
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Wels
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wels

Wels is the second largest city of the state of Upper Austria, located in the north of Austria, upon the Traun River near Linz. It is not part of its surrounding Wels County (Bezirk Wels-Land), but a so-called Statutarstadt (independent city). However, Wels is the county seat of Wels-Land.

Geography

Wels is located in the Hausruckviertel at an elevation of 317 m. From north to south, it extends over 9.5 km, from west to east over 9.6 km. 3.4% of the area are covered with forest, 23.5% are used for agriculture.

The town comprises the following boroughs: Aichberg, Au, Berg, Brandln, Dickerldorf, Doppelgraben, Eben, Gaßl, Höllwiesen, Hölzl, Kirchham, Laahen, Lichtenegg, Mitterlaab, Nöham, Niederthan, Oberhaid, Oberhart, Oberlaab, Oberthan, Pernau, Puchberg, Roithen, Rosenau, Schafwiesen, Stadlhof, Trausenegg, Unterleithen, Waidhausen, Wels, Wimpassing, Wispl.

History

The area of Wels has been settled since the Neolithic era and gained importance in Roman times because of its central location in the province of Noricum. Around the year 120, Wels received Roman city rights under the name of Municipium Ovilava. Around 215, it was named Colonia Aurelia Antoniana Ovilabis by Emperor Caracalla. At that time, the city already had 18,000 inhabitants. However, Wels completely lost its importance with the end of Roman rule.

Wels seved as a minjor trading center during the Middle Ages. In 1222, during the rule of the Babenberger family, Wels again received city rights. A document dating to 1328 provides evidence for Wels' important role as the location of a market. Its endowment with economic privileges, and its advantageous position upon several rivers allowed it to gain an important position in the region.

Emperor Maximilian I died in Wels on January 12, 1519, after having been denied access to Innsbruck by its citizens.

During World War II, a subcamp of Mauthausen concentration camp was located here.

On January 18, 1964, Wels became a Statutarstadt of Austria.

Historical population

215: 18,000; 1991: 40,676; 2001: 56,478

Economy

There are about 36,000 people employed in Wels. Of that, about 63% are in the sevice sector. Wels is known as an important city for shopping and the location of several gymnasiums (schools) and higher vocational schools and also of a vocational college. Furthermore, it is known for the Wels Fair, which takes place every two years in fall.

 
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Old 12-26-2007, 10:00 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by the antipop
Wels
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wels


The area of Wels has been settled since the Neolithic era and gained importance in Roman times because of its central location in the province of Noricum. Around the year 120, Wels received Roman city rights under the name of Municipium Ovilava. Around 215, it was named Colonia Aurelia Antoniana Ovilabis by Emperor Caracalla. At that time, the city already had 18,000 inhabitants. However, Wels completely lost its importance with the end of Roman rule.
That's pretty awesome.

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 12:30 AM   #15
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Houma

The city of Houma (pronounced /homˈɑ/) is the parish seat of Terrebonne Parish, in the U.S. state of Louisiana and the hub of a metropolitan area of over 200,000 residents. [1] [2] The city's powers of government have been absorbed by the parish, which is now run by the Terrebonne Parish Consolidated Government. The population was 32,393 at the 2000 census. There are many unincorporated areas adjacent to the city of Houma; the largest, Bayou Cane, is an urbanized area commonly referred to by locals as Houma but is not included in the 2000 census count, and is in fact a separate census-designated place. For this reason the actual population of the Houma area is estimated to be significantly greater than the census figure.

Houma in popular culture

* Houma and the surrounding area are the setting for the fictional Swamp Thing comic books, the 1994 V. C. Andrews book Ruby, and the 2005 film The Skeleton Key (which was not filmed in Houma or Terrebonne Parish).
* Houma resident Martin Folse, who also owns the local News station HTV, filmed the movie Nutria Man: Terror in the Swamp in the swamps in and around Houma in 1983.
* Blues musician and co-star of the IMAX movie feature Hurricane on the Bayou, Tab Benoit, grew up in Houma and attended Vandebilt Catholic High School.
* Several professional athletes, past and present, were either born or raised in the Houma area, including current New York Giants running back Brandon Jacobs. Former professional athletes from the Houma area ******* NFL players Frank Lewis, Clarence Verdin, and Richie Cunningham, and former Major League Baseball pitcher Wally Whitehurst.
* Rock musician Dax Riggs has lived much of his life in Houma.


Maaaaaaaan. My town is boring.

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 12:31 AM   #16
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Also, Wikipedia forgot that Demolition Man and Crazy in Alabama were filmed down here.

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 12:36 AM   #17
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i lived here from when i was 6 until i was 18

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parkland%2C_Florida

since that place is boring and so is the article about it, here's where i live now. it's more interesting

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coral_Gables%2C_Florida

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 12:44 AM   #18
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I grew up in Bumpass

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bumpass,_Virginia

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 01:12 AM   #19
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Bethesda, Maryland
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Bethesda, Maryland

Panorama of downtown Bethesda (taken from the Residence Inn Bethesda at 7335 Wisconsin Avenue.)

Location of Bethesda, Maryland

Coordinates: 38°59′5″N 77°6′47″W
Country United States
State Maryland
County Montgomery
Area
- Total 13.2 sq mi (34.2 km²)
- Land 13.1 sq mi (34.0 km²)
- Water 0.0 sq mi (0.1 km²)
Elevation 318 ft (97 m)
Population (2000)
- Total 55,277
- Density 4,205.8/sq mi (1,623.9/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
- Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 20800-20899
Area code(s) 301
FIPS code 24-07125
GNIS feature ID 0583184
Bethesda is an urbanized, but unincorporated, area in southern Montgomery County, Maryland, just Northwest of Washington, D.C. It takes its name from a church located there, the Bethesda Presbyterian Church, built in 1820 and rebuilt in 1850, which in turn took its name from Jerusalem's Pool of Bethesda. (In Aramaic, beth hesda means "house of mercy".)
As an unincorporated area, Bethesda has no official boundaries. The United States Census Bureau defines a Census-Designated Place named Bethesda whose center is located at 38°59' North, 77°7' West. The United States Geological Survey has defined Bethesda as an area whose center is at 38°58′50″N, 77°6′2″W, slightly different from the Census Bureau's definition. Other definitions are used by the Bethesda Urban Planning District, the United States Postal Service, and other organizations. As of 2000, the Census-defined community had a total population of 55,277.
Contents [hide]
1 Geography
2 Demographics
3 History
4 Landmarks
5 Notable residents and natives
6 References
7 External links
[edit]Geography



Boundaries of Bethesda CDP as of 2003
Bethesda is located at 38°59′5″N, 77°6′47″W (38.984660, -77.113135)GR1.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 34.2 km² (13.2 mi²). 34.0 km² (13.1 mi²) of it is land and 0.1 km² (0.1 mi²) of it (0.38%) is water.
The main commercial corridor that runs through Bethesda is Maryland Route 355 (known as Wisconsin Avenue in Bethesda and as Rockville Pike and Hungerford Drive in more northern communities), which, to the north, connects Bethesda with the communities of Kensington and Rockville, ending, after several name changes, in Frederick, Maryland. Toward the South, Rockville Pike becomes Wisconsin Avenue near the NIH Campus and continues beyond Bethesda through Chevy Chase, Friendship Heights, Maryland and into Washington, DC, ending in Georgetown.
The area commonly known as "downtown Bethesda" is centered at the intersection of Route 355 (Wisconsin Avenue) with Maryland Route 187 (Old Georgetown Road), and Maryland Route 410 (called "East-West Highway"). Much of the dense construction in that area followed the opening of the Bethesda station on the Red Line of the Washington Metro rapid transit system, also located at this intersection and the centerpiece of the Bethesda Metro Center development. The "downtown," which includes the restaurant districts of Bethesda Row and Woodmont Triangle, lies about 0.7 miles south of Bethesda's other Red Line stop, Medical Center, which serves the NIH Campus and the National Naval Medical Center. Bethesda Row and Woodmont Triangle are under heavy development, including several luxury condominiums, restaurants, and businesses.
The outer rim of Bethesda is known for older houses that still hold a strong value in today’s residential market. Even with the great “bubble burst” in 2006, Bethesda real estate seems to be holding strong. As of November 2, homes are for sale in Bethesda alone for an average price of $994,900, a price change up from October +7.6%. Bethesda Zip codes ******* 20814, 20816, and 20817.
[edit]Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop. %±
1960 56,527

1970 71,621 26.7%
1980 62,736 -12.4%
1990 62,936 0.3%
2000 55,277 -12.2%
source: [1]
As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 55,277 people, 23,659 households, and 14,455 families residing in the defined area. The population density was 1,624.2/km² (4,205.8/mi²). There were 24,368 housing units at an average density of 716.0/km² (1,854.1/mi²). The racial makeup of the community was 85.86% White, 2.67% Black or African American, 0.17% Native American, 7.92% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.23% from other races, and 2.11% from two or more races. 5.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.
There were 23,659 households out of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.9% were non-families. 32.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.30 and the average family size was 2.92.
In the community the population was spread out with 21.9% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.0 males.
Bethesda is a wealthy and well-educated area. According to the 2000 Census, Bethesda is the best-educated city in the United States of America with a population of 50,000 or more. 79% of residents 25 or older have bachelor's degrees and 49% have graduate or professional degrees. The median income for a household is $99,102, and the median income for a family was $130,160. Males had a median income of $84,797 versus $57,569 for females. The per capita income for the area was $58,479. About 1.7% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.8% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over. Many commute to Washington D.C. for work.
Bethesda is often associated with its neighboring communities, Potomac, MD, Chevy Chase, MD, Great Falls, VA, and McLean, VA for their similar demographics.
[edit]History

Bethesda is situated along a major thoroughfare that was originally the route of an ancient Native American trail. Between 1805 and 1820, it was developed into a toll road to carry tobacco and other products between Georgetown and Frederick. Starting around 1920, various sections of the road were paved and widened. The route is now known as Wisconsin Avenue, becoming Rockville Pike just north of the Bethesda town center.[citation needed]
The community of Bethesda took its name from the Bethesda Meeting House, a Presbyterian church built in 1820 on the present site of the Cemetery of the Bethesda Meeting House, located now at 9400 Rockville Pike. The church burnt in 1850 and was rebuilt the same year about 100 yards south at its present site. In 1871, the local post office adopted the name "Bethesda" from the church and in due course the surrounding area generally took on the name.[citation needed]
This short section requires expansion.
[edit]Landmarks



Building 50 at NIH.
Important institutions located in Bethesda ******* the National Institutes of Health campus, the Consumer Product Safety Commission, the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency, and the Naval Surface Warfare Center Carderock Division. Bethesda is also home to the National Naval Medical Center, commonly referred to as Bethesda Naval Hospital, where many famous Americans such as Senator Joseph McCarthy died, and the John F. Kennedy autopsy was performed. Adjoining the hospital to the east is the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS).
The headquarters of defense conglomerate Lockheed Martin, managed health care company Coventry Health Care and hotel and resort chains Marriott International and Host Hotels & Resorts, Inc. are located in Bethesda. Software company Bethesda Softworks was originally located in Bethesda, but moved to Rockville, Maryland in 1990. The Discovery Channel also had its headquarters in Bethesda before relocating to Silver Spring in 2004. Bethesda is renowned for its extensive collection of restaurants—180 were listed at the end of 2004—offering cuisine ranging from Afghan to Vietnamese. Bethesda is also home to two vibrant farmers markets, the Montgomery Farm Woman's Cooperative Market and the Bethesda Farmer's Market, as well as numerous cinemas and art galleries.
Also located in downtown Bethesda is one of just 12 Madonna of the Trail monuments, erected by the National Old Trails Association working in concert with the Daughters of the American Revolution. Judge Harry S. Truman, later 33rd President of the United States, presided over the dedication of the Bethesda monument, on April 19, 1929. Eleven others were erected as well, and they stretch from Upland, California to Bethesda, the easternmost of these monuments, which commemorate the spirit of pioneer women during the westward expansion of the U.S.A. Nearby is the Bethesda Post Office, probably the oldest standing building in the downtown area. Also starting in the heart of downtown Bethesda, is the Capital Crescent Trail Capital Crescent Trail which follows the old tracks of the B&O Railroad stretching from Georgetown, Washington, D.C. to Silver Spring, MD.
Bethesda is also home to the Burning Tree Club and the Bethesda Country Club.
In addition, Bethesda has many good public schools. Bethesda's primary public high schools were ranked by Newsweek Magazine in 2006 as among the best in the country. Bethesda-Chevy Chase High School was ranked 34th nationally, Walter Johnson High School ranked 101st and Walt Whitman High School was ranked 116th.
[edit]Notable residents and natives

Matthew Abend, comedian
Jess Atkinson, former NFL kicker
Red Auerbach, former Boston Celtics GM and coach (deceased October 28, 2006)
Michelle Bachelet, president of Chile
William Peter Blatty, critically acclaimed writer of The Exorcist among other works
John R. Bolton, former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, and former Under Secretary of State
L. Paul Bremer, former Director of Reconstruction and Humanitarian Assistance for post-war Iraq
David Brooks, a New York Times editorial writer, and author of several books
James Brown, sports announcer
Gary Clark, former Washington Redskin and Two-Time Super Bowl Champion
E.J. Dionne, author and journalist, known for Why Americans Hate Politics: The Death of the Democratic Process
John Feinstein, author, columnist and reporter
Douglas Feith, former Under Secretary of Defense for Policy in the Department of Defense.
Thomas Friedman, a New York Times editorial writer, and author of several books.
John Glenn, former astronaut and United States Senator
Jeff Halpern, Dallas Stars forward
Robert Hays, actor, known for role in Airplane!, born in Bethesda on July 24, 1947
Jack Kemp, Vice Presidential Candidate, Former HUD Secretary, Former US Congressman, and Former Buffalo Bills Quarterback
Jeane Kirkpatrick, former American ambassador, known for her Kirkpatrick Doctrine on foreign politics
Gary Michael Krist, a writer and journalist
Tim Kurkjian, ESPN reporter and Baseball Tonight analyst
Marie Levens, former minister for foreign affairs of Suriname
Paul Light
Julia Louis-Dreyfus, heiress and critically acclaimed actress. Raised in Bethesda and graduated from the Holton-Arms School
J.W. Marriott, Jr., Chairman and CEO, Marriott International
Brian McComas, country music artist
Paul Mirengoff, attorney and co-author of Power Line blog
Jim Moody, Former Wisconsin congressman
Bruce Morrison, Former US Congressman and Connecticut Gubernatorial candidate
Phyllis Reynolds Naylor, author
Ann Brashares, author, The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants
Maury Povich, talk-show host. Resides part-time in Bethesda with his wife, Connie Chung
Cokie Roberts, American journalist, author, and contributor to NPR
Dennis Ross, author, director of policy planning in the State Department under George W. Bush, and Middle East coordinator under Bill Clinton
John Schiavone, ambassador of Mexico
Eunice Kennedy Shriver and her husband Sargent Shriver, Jr. live in Bethesda, near the Potomac border
David Willman, Pulitzer prize winning journalist
Dainius Zubrus, ice hockey right winger and centre currently playing for the New Jersey Devils

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 03:10 AM   #20
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honolulu,_Hawaii

sorriest fact?:Currently, Honolulu has no professional sports teams. However, Honolulu hosts the NFL's annual Pro Bowl each February in addition to the NCAA football Hawaii Bowl

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 03:34 AM   #21
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Where I was born -


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anchorage,_Alaska

Where I grew up -

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pine_Ri...an_Reservation

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 04:17 AM   #22
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now i know where you live....

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 04:35 AM   #23
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Warren, Michigan
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City of Warren
Official seal of City of Warren
Seal
Coordinates: [show location on an interactive map] 42°29′31″N 83°1′26″W / 42.49194, -83.02389
Country United States
State Michigan
County Macomb
Incorporated 1957
Government
- Type Council-Strong Mayor
- Mayor James R. Fouts
Area
- Total 34.3 sq mi (88.9 km²)
- Land 34.3 sq mi (88.8 km²)
- Water 0.04 sq mi (0.1 km²)
Elevation 627 ft (191 m)
Population
- Total 138,247
- Density 4,031.8/sq mi (1,556.7/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
- Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
Area code(s) 586
FIPS code 26-84000GR2
GNIS feature ID 1615781GR3
Website: http://www.cityofwarren.org/

Warren is a city in Macomb County in the U.S. state of Michigan. As of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 138,247, making Warren the largest city in Macomb County, the third most populous city in Michigan, and Metro Detroit's largest suburb.

The city is home to a wide variety of businesses, including General Motors Technical Center, the United States Army Tank-Automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM), the Tank Automotive Research, Development and Engineering Center (TARDEC), the National Automotive Center (NAC), and the headquarters of Big Boy Restaurants International and Asset Acceptance. The current mayor is James R. Fouts, who was elected to his first mayoral term in November 2007. Eminem attended Warren Lincoln High School from 1986-1989.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Geography
* 3 Demographics
* 4 Culture, education and recreation
* 5 References
* 6 External links

[edit] History

In 1950 Warren was an incorporated village of one square mile within the boundaries of Warren Township, Macomb County, Michigan. It was centered on the corner of Mound Road and Chicago Road.[1] The village had a population of 582 in 1940 and 727 in 1950.[2]

Warren was incorporated as a city in 1957 and consists of what was previously Warren Township, less the city of Center Line. Between 1950 and 1960, Warren's population soared from 42,653 to 89,426. This population explosion was fueled in part by white flight from its southern neighbor of Detroit in that decade. This change in population continued into the next decade when the city's population doubled again. As the community has matured, its population has begun to gradually decline.

[edit] Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Warren has a total area of 34.3 square miles (88.9 km²), of which, 34.3 square miles (88.8 km²) of it is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km²) of it is water.

The city covers a six mile-by-six mile (10 km x 10 km) square in the southwest corner of Macomb County in suburban Detroit. The city of Center Line is entirely enclosed within Warren. Other cities bordering on Warren are Detroit, Hazel Park, Madison Heights, Sterling Heights, Fraser, Roseville, and Eastpointe.

[edit] Demographics
Historical populations
Census Pop. %±
1900 2,567

1910 2,445 -4.8%
1920 3,564 45.8%
1930 14,269 300.4%
1940 22,126 55.1%
1950 42,653 92.8%
1960 89,426 109.7%
1970 179,260 100.5%
1980 161,134 -10.1%
1990 144,864 -10.1%
2000 138,247 -4.6%
Est. 2006 134,589 -2.6%

As of 2006, there were 138,247 people, 55,551 households, and 36,719 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,556.6/km² (4,031.8/sq mi). There were 57,249 housing units at an average density of 1,669.6/sq mi (644.6/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68.29% White, 26.67% African American, 2.09% Asian, 0.36% Native American, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.34% from other races, and 2.23% from two or more races. 1.35% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

Ancestries: Polish (21.0%), German (20.4%), Irish (11.5%), Italian (10.6%), English (7.3%), French (5.3%).

There were 55,551 households out of which 27.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.7% were married couples living together, 11.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.05.

The city’s population was spread out with 22.9% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $44,626, and the median income for a family was $52,444. Males had a median income of $41,454 versus $28,368 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,407. 7.4% of the population and 5.2% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total people living in poverty, 9.5% were under the age of 18 and 5.8% were 65 or older.

There are a number of distinguishing characteristics about Warren which render it unique:

* Warren was one of the fastest-growing areas in the country between 1940 and 1970. It had a habit of doubling its population every 10 years: In 1940 the official population of Warren Township was 22,146; in 1950, it was 42,653; in 1960, after Warren Township had become the City of Warren, it was up to 89,240; by 1970 it had grown to 179,274.
* Since 1970, Warren has been consistently one of the faster declining cities in population in the country. The population dropped by 10% during each of the next two decades (1980: 161,060; 1990: 144,864), and continued its downward trend by shedding another 4.6% of its population by 2000.
* Warren’s population is currently one of the oldest among large cities in the U.S. 17.3% of Warren's population was 65 or older at the last census, tied for fifth with Hollywood, FL among cities with 100,000+ population, and indeed the highest ranking city outside of Florida or Hawaii.[1]
* Warren is ranked 1st in the nation for resident longevity. Residents of Warren on average have lived in that community 35.5 years, compared to the national average of 8 years for communities of 100,000+ population.
* Warren had the distinction of being the "whitest" large city as well. In 1970, whites made up 99.5% of its total population of 179,274; only 838 non-whites lived within the city limits. (Fellow Detroit suburb Livonia now holds the distinction of being America's "whitest city" as of the 2000 Census.) Racial integration has come slowly to Warren: the white proportion has dropped only gradually in the past few decades, to 98.2% in 1980, 97.3% in 1990, and 91.3% in 2000. However the 2000 figure for non-Hispanic whites was 90.4%.[3] Warren remains a population center for people of Polish, Lebanese, Ukrainian, Scots-Irish, and Chaldean descent.

The fact that both Chaldeans and Lebenese are not white by many people's definitions of white. Beyond this the number of blacks in Warren has risen substantially since 2000. Census estimates for 2006 placed the black population of Warren at about 11%, a substantial increase.[4] Warren also has a growing Hmong population.[5]

The post-1970 population change in Warren has been so pronounced that by 2000 there were 1, 026 Filipinos in Warren as well as 1,145 Asian Indians in the city, and 1,559 American Indians. Many of the American Indians in Warren originated in the Southern United States with 429 Cherokee and 66 Lumbee. In fact the Lumbee were the third largest American Indian "tribe" in the city, with only the 193 Chippewa outnumbering them.[6]

[edit] Culture, education and recreation

Warren is served by five public school districts. Postsecondary institutions ******* the south campus of Macomb Community College, Davenport University, and the Warren Center for Central Michigan University. The public library system comprises four branches, and the city recreation department supports a community center and a recreation center along with a system of 24 parks. The Warren Symphony Orchestra gives several concerts per season. In 2003 the city built a brand new Community Center where the old Warren High School was. It has an auditorium, several gyms and conference rooms, three pools, and the 'Top voted' fitness center in Michigan as of 2006. Also in 2006, Warren Community Center was voted 'The best Community/Recreation Center in Michigan.'

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 06:55 AM   #24
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irvine%2C_North_Ayrshire

I won't just copy and paste the page, thats just lame. Some little bits of info:

Irvine, North Ayrshire

William Wallace enjoyed the fishing and fighting around the River Irvine. Most of his early exploits are firmly placed in the Irvine Valley. He was possibly present at the Capitulation of Irvine.

Alfred Nobel built an explosives factory in Ardeer which sits on the opposing bank of the River Irvine's mouth.

Roddy Woomble, singer of the band Idlewild was born in the town


 
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Old 12-27-2007, 06:59 AM   #25
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bruges

lots-a nice-a pictures!

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 07:01 AM   #26
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you had a place with Dolphins and you never told me I hate you Bram!!!

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 07:03 AM   #27
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Novi_Sad

Article too big to post. Spent my first four years there. Left, returned ten years later for a holiday.

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 07:07 AM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kahlo
you had a place with Dolphins and you never told me I hate you Bram!!!
LOL!

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 08:44 AM   #29
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"Bethel is a village in Clermont County, Ohio, United States. The population was 2,637 at the 2000 census.
Bethel was founded in 1798, by Obed Denham, in what was then the Northwest Territory.
Bethel is the birthplace of former US Senator Thomas Morris, advocate of human liberty.
Bethel was a childhood home of United States President Ulysses S. Grant who was born in nearby Point Pleasant. Bethel is home to the Grant Memorial. It was also the birthplace of Ulysses Simpson Grant, Jr., his son, who became an attorney and entrepreneur.
Bethel is also the birthplace of Christian recording artist Jimmy Dooley.
It is home to the Star Light Drive-In, one of the few remaining drive-in theatres in the United States.
[edit]Geography

Bethel is located at 38°57′47″N, 84°4′54″W (38.963171, -84.081787)GR1.
According to the United States Census Bureau, the village has a total area of 1.3 square miles (3.5 km²), all of it land.
[edit]Demographics

As of the censusGR2 of 2000, there were 2,637 people, 1,012 households, and 682 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,969.2 people per square mile (759.8/km²). There were 1,099 housing units at an average density of 820.7/sq mi (316.7/km²). The racial makeup of the village was 98.29% White, 0.11% African American, 0.19% Native American, 0.19% Asian, and 1.21% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.72% of the population.
There were 1,012 households out of which 40.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.59 and the average family size was 3.22.
In the village the population was spread out with 31.9% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 15.8% from 45 to 64, and 13.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 87.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.9 males.
The median income for a household in the village was $31,385, and the median income for a family was $38,448. Males had a median income of $31,829 versus $23,844 for females. The per capita income for the village was $15,071. About 16.4% of families and 20.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 26.9% of those under age 18 and 20.1% of those age 65 or over."

God what a hole. I hate that place

 
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Old 12-27-2007, 05:19 PM   #30
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Lakewood Township, New Jersey
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Lakewood, New Jersey
Map of Lakewood Township in Ocean County
Map of Lakewood Township in Ocean County
Coordinates: [show location on an interactive map] 40°4′58″N 74°12′34″W / 40.08278, -74.20944
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Ocean
Area
- Total 25.1 sq mi (65.0 km²)
- Land 24.8 sq mi (64.3 km²)
- Water 0.3 sq mi (0.8 km²)
Elevation 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2000)
- Total 60,352
- Density 2,431.8/sq mi (938.9/km²)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
- Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08701
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 34-38550GR2
GNIS feature ID 0882076GR3

Lakewood Township is a Township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the United States 2000 Census, the township had a total population of 60,352. Lakewood is an urban center serving Northern Ocean and Southern Monmouth Counties.

Lakewood was incorporated as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 23, 1892, from portions of Brick Township. Portions of Howell Township in Monmouth County were annexed to Lakewood Township in 1929.[1]

Lakewood is one of the hubs of Orthodox Judaism and is home to one of the largest yeshivas in the world. The large Orthodox population, comprising nearly half of the township's population, wields considerable political clout in Lakewood Township, commanding a bloc of about 10,000 votes.[2]

Lakewood CDP (2000 Census population of 36,065), Leisure Village (1,785) and Leisure Village East (1,594) are census-designated places and unincorporated areas located within Lakewood Township.
Contents
[hide]

* 1 History
* 2 Geography
* 3 Demographics
* 4 Government
o 4.1 Local government
o 4.2 Federal, state and county representation
* 5 Education
* 6 Attractions
* 7 Notable residents
* 8 References
* 9 External links

[edit] History

Lakewood was known as one of the New York City region's winter resorts at the turn of the 1900's. This was due to a pocket of climate that was 3 to 5 degrees warmer than the City. Its Lake Carasaljo and surrounding pine trees made for a picturesque holiday. The Rockefeller family had an estate which has been turned into Ocean County Park. The Jay Gould Estate is now Georgian Court College.[3] Parts of The Amityville Horror were filmed there.[4]

[edit] Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 25.1 square miles (65.1 km²), of which, 24.8 square miles (64.3 km²) of it is land and 0.3 square miles (0.8 km²) of it (1.19%) is water.

[edit] Demographics
Historical populations
Census Pop. %±
1930 7,869

1940 8,502 8.0%
1950 10,809 27.1%
1960 16,020 48.2%
1970 25,233 57.5%
1980 38,464 52.4%
1990 45,048 17.1%
2000 60,352 34.0%
Est. 2006 69,606 [5] 15.3%
Population 1930 - 1990.[6]

As of the census² of 2000, there were 60,352 people, 19,876 households, and 13,356 families residing in the township. The population density was 2,431.8 people per square mile (938.8/km²). There were 21,214 housing units at an average density of 854.8/sq mi (330.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 78.77% White, 12.05% African American, 0.17% Native American, 1.39% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 4.61% from other races, and 2.98% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 14.80% of the population. There were 19,876 households out of which 32.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.3% were married couples living together, 10.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.8% were non-families. 28.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 19.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.64.

In the township the population was spread out with 31.8% under the age of 18, 10.1% from 18 to 24, 23.5% from 25 to 44, 15.7% from 45 to 64, and 18.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females there were 91.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.5 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $35,634, and the median income for a family was $43,806. Males had a median income of $38,967 versus $26,645 for females. The per capita income for the township was $16,700. About 15.7% of families and 19.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 28.9% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

[edit] Government

[edit] Local government

Lakewood's Township Committee is a five-member committee elected in staggered three-year terms. The township committee exercises all legislative power of the township, except in matters of health, which are done at the Board of Health. In addition, the Committee appoints members to many boards, commissions, and committees. Each member of the township committee serves as a liaison to different divisions, departments, and committees.

The mayor, elected from among the members of the committee, presides at meetings and performs other such duties as the Township Committee may prescribe. The mayor has the power to appoint subcommittees with the consent of the committee. When authorized, he or she executes documents on behalf of the township, makes proclamations concerning holidays and events of interest, and exercises ceremonial power of the Township and other powers conferred upon him by law.

The Mayor of Lakewood Township is Ray Coles (D, term ends December 31, 2008). Other Township Committee members are Deputy Mayor Meir Lichtenstein (D, 2009), Charles Cunliffe (D, 2008), Menashe Miller (R, 2009) and State Senator Robert Singer (R, 2007).[7][8]

On Election Day, November 7, 2006, incumbent Township Committee members Democrat Meir Lichtenstein and Republican Menashe Miller easily won reelection to office in a field of five candidates.[9]

[edit] Federal, state and county representation

Lakewood Township is in the Fourth Congressional District and is part of New Jersey's 30th Legislative District.[10]

New Jersey's Fourth Congressional District, covering portions of Burlington County, Mercer County, Monmouth County and Ocean County, is represented by Christopher Smith (R). New Jersey is represented in the Senate by Frank Lautenberg (D, Cliffside Park) and Bob Menendez (D, Hoboken).

The 30th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Robert Singer (R, Lakewood Township) and in the Assembly by Ronald S. Dancer (R, Jackson Township) and Joseph R. Malone (R, Bordentown). The Governor of New Jersey is Jon Corzine (D, Hoboken).

Ocean County is governed by a five-member Board of Chosen Freeholders. Ocean County's Freeholders are: John C. Bartlett Jr., John P. Kelly, James F. Lacey, Gerry P. Little and Joseph H. Vicari.

[edit] Education

The Lakewood School District is broken up into three different stages of schooling. (2004-05 enrollment data is from the National Center for Education Statistics). Students from K-6 attend one of the district's four Elementary Schools: Oak Street School, with 941 students; Spruce Street School, with 637 students; Clifton Avenue School, with 763 students; and Ella G. Clarke School, with 963 students (including pre-K). In grades 7 and 8 children attend Lakewood Middle School, which has 739 students. For grades 9-12 students attend Lakewood High School, with an enrollment of 1,317 students.

Georgian Court University is a private, Roman Catholic university located on the shores of Lake Carasaljo. Founded in 1908 by the Sisters of Mercy as a women's college, the school's strong emphasis on education for women continues, with women comprising 88% of the student population in Fall 2006.

There are many Yeshivas and Jewish day schools catering to the Orthodox Jewish community, with thousands of children enrolled. Beth Medrash Govoha, the largest Yeshiva (Rabbinical Academy) in North America, is also located in Lakewood. In addition, there are at least two Christian schools in Lakewood - the non-denominational Calvary Academy [1], and the Roman Catholic affiliated Holy Family School. The former serves grades K-12, while the latter serves youth from pre-school through 8th grade.

[edit] Attractions

* Sister Mary Grace Burns Arboretum, on the campus of Georgian Court University
* FirstEnergy Park, home of the Lakewood BlueClaws, Single A South Atlantic League minor league baseball team and affiliate of the Philadelphia Phillies

[edit] Notable residents

* Ngo Dinh Diem, first President of South Vietnam.
* Morton Abramowitz, President, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace (1991-1997); United States Ambassador to Thailand and Turkey.
* Marc Ecko, Founder and CEO of *eckō unltd.[11]
* George Jay Gould I, financier and railroad executive, whose estate was donated to create Georgian Court University
* Serge Jaroff, conductor, composer and founder of the Don Cossack Chorus
* Edith Kingdon, actress wife of George Jay Gould I
* Rabbi Aharon Kotler, founder of the Beth Medrash Govoha yeshiva and one of the pre-eminent authorities on Jewish law (halacha) in the 20th Century
* Robert Schmertz, Founder and CEO of Leisure Technology Corp.; Former owner of the Portland Trail Blazers and Boston Celtics.[12]
* J.R. Smith, NBA Player. Currently plays for the Denver Nuggets.[13]
* Mookie Wilson, American baseball player, mostly notably with the New York Mets.
* James Rolfe, also known to many as the Angry Video Game Nerd

[edit] References

oh yeah and

1975 Little League World Series
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1975 Little League World Series
Start date August 20
End date August 23
Teams participating 4
Champion Flag of New Jersey Lakewood Little League
Lakewood, New Jersey
Runner-up Flag of Florida Belmont Heights Little League
Tampa, Florida

The 1975 Little League World Series took place between August 20 and August 23 in Williamsport, Pennsylvania. The Lakewood Little League of Lakewood, New Jersey defeated the Belmont Heights Little League of Tampa, Florida in the championship game of the 29th Little League World Series.

 
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