Netphoria Message Board


Go Back   Netphoria Message Board > Smashing Pumpkins Boards > Smashing Pumpkins/Billy Corgan Discussion
Register Netphoria's Amazon.com Link Members List Photo Album Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 10-24-2017, 03:50 PM   #1
Forgotten Child
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Forgotten Child's Avatar
 
Location: SP, Sao Paulo - Brazil
Posts: 1,442
Default "I love the work he did, itís so cool."

http://drownedinsound.com/in_depth/4...s-billy-corgan

DiS: When did you realise this group of songs were destined for a solo record, rather than a Smashing Pumpkins one?

Billy Corgan: It was a bit of a strange process. I was working on a Pumpkins album, but I became sort of disgusted with the whole thing, so I quit it. I wrote another group of songs, listened to them back, and thought, ďOK, I want to do something with theseĒ. I also made up my own mind, at that point, that I wasnít going to do any more Pumpkins records. Thatís when I started moving down this road, and really, I could have called it anything: I could have put it out under a different name entirely. I didnít give that part too much thought. The whole process really began when Rick Rubin said he was interested in being involved; thatís when it became a serious thing, and the next thing I knew, I was out recording it at his studio in beautiful Malibu.

Once youíd sworn off the Pumpkins, did you figure that the next bunch of songs would be a kick against the sound of the band? This is such a sparse record.


It looks that way, but it didnít feel that way. I think Iíd gotten about as far in one direction with the band as I could go, so for me, it was like going back to the start Ė it wasnít a reaction as much as it was that when you make rock music or pop music, you spend a lot of time looking at whatís going on in the world and thinking about whether or not you have anything to add to the conversation, or if itís just that you want to stomp on something. That was my initial impetus for getting into music Ė I wanted to stomp all over what I was seeing, whereas this time, Iím trying to contribute to the conversation. I felt like I needed to go back to being a songwriter to make sense of what was going on in my brain.

I read that you called Rick Rubin to ask him to recommend a producer. Why not just ask him to do it himself?

I totally didnít think it would be on his radar. For a start, I didnít even know what I was doing at that point. I didnít know which direction the songs were heading in, but he does these massive projects, so the idea that he would want to be part of this acoustic solo record...I didnít think itíd even be in the same zip code as what he normally works on.

He always had a reputation for stripping things back earlier in his career, though. Were the songs like that when you took them to him, or was that his influence?

He told me he liked the feeling of the demos that I sent him, so he just wanted to start there and see where it led us. He didnít have a destination in mind, I donít think - he said he wanted to let the record make itself, so it wasnít like when we were recording, we knew what would and wouldnít be the final version. We were open to anything, and I trusted him to take it to wherever itíd have some energy behind it. I said from the beginning that I was happy to follow his lead.

The instrumental palette primarily involves piano and acoustic guitar, which is a long way away from what springs to mind when people think about the Pumpkins.


Yeah, but Iíve still done a lot of work like that in the past, so itís not as unfamiliar as it might seem. I mean, a lot of Mellon Collie has that kind of stuff on it; in fact, if you take away the drums from that record, thereís a lot of that kind of production on it. I came in with literally just voice-and-guitar demos and, like I said, if Rick had suggested putting a sixty-piece orchestra on them, or flying to India to record them in the lotus position, I was ready to follow that. Left to my own devices, I probably wouldíve added far more layers.

Do you think your sensibilities have changed over the years in terms of production?

You know, that was kind of a weird backdrop to this record. For a long time, Iíve had fans come up to me and say that they didnít like a certain song when they first heard them, and that it took them twenty listens to realise that actually, it was a great song Ė it was just that they didnít like the production, so why did I fuck it up by putting sitars on it or something? Iíve heard that a lot down the years, and I donít take offence at it because the production is just a version, just the way you interpret the song at the time Ė the song itself is sacrosanct. Oftentimes, itís something thatís influenced by whatís going on in your own life, or going on in the culture around you. Thatís where all the big snare drums came from in the eighties, when even Eric Clapton had them on his records. Youíre influenced by the tastes of the time, but the really good songs tend to last regardless.

It doesnít seem like a coincidence that the last Pumpkins tour was the stripped-back In Plainsong tour, and then the next record youíve made is so similar in style to the reinterpretations of those old songs. What made you want to tour the Pumpkins acoustically in the first place?

I guess the best way for me to answer your question faithfully is that there seemed to be an organic interest in my songwriting and my singing in that kind of stripped-down form, and that interest just wasnít there for an electric tour. You do the math. I donít know why it turned out that way. The core of the band for the last few years has been myself and Jeff Schroeder, and weíd sit around saying, ďWell, we donít why this is working, but weíre not going to argueĒ. Weíd had so much difficulty with the other version of the band.

What was the issue with playing electric shows?

Weíd go out with various lineups and play really good shows, playing a lot of songs that people knew, and they were just never happy. It was like it didnít matter what you did Ė we couldíve stood on our heads and played every possible greatest hit, and the audiences still wouldnít have been satisfied, whether it was because certain people werenít there, or because they didnít like the way I was standing, or because Iíd grown older. There was always something.

Suddenly, we sort of stumbled accidentally into playing acoustic, and everybody was patting us on the back and saying, ďWow, you sound great!Ē I was almost suspicious about it, because I hadnít had that level of positivity around me since probably 1997. We sold a lot of tickets and were playing to happy, smiling faces Ė nobody was giving us the finger and telling us to fuck off. I donít know how we got there, but I was cool with it. We sort of fumbled our way into it, because we werenít getting a lot of positive signals from the culture, that was for sure.

The first track on Ogilala, ĎZowieí - you wrote that after David Bowie died, right?

Right.

You knew and worked with him a little bit - what did he mean to you?

Well, I think that he made a commitment early on, circa 1972, that he was going to chart this very singular path, and I think he was true to it. Thatís pretty inspiring, because weíre talking about a legend who did everything from Ziggy Stardust to ĎLetís Danceí. The amount of amazing songs was just mind-boggling. So, you had this A-level talent who could have been anything Ė he couldíve been the next Frank Sinatra, if heíd wanted Ė but he chose to be a space alien. He had good times and bad times, but he never deviated from his inner faith that his vision was important. He stuck with it all the way to the end. As an artist, youíve always got people in your ear, whispering ďIf only you could [insert compromise here]Ē. If you look at Davidís path, or Neil Youngís path, you see that itís still possible to grind out a vision that means something, and thatíll grow in time. I love those artists who knew it wasnít a popularity contest; if you look at the arc of Davidís work, there were popular times and not-so-popular times, but there was very good work in all those times.

Have you had that whisper in the ear yourself down the years?

Quite a bit, yeah. It wasnít too long ago that I was at a wrestling show in England, and I was stood backstage with a promoter, and they were asking me why I wonít play my old albums in full. Because I donít fucking want to play my old albums! Thatís the music businessí way of telling you youíre dead. People were joking to me, ďHey, even U2 are doing it now!Ē Yeah, but to a fucking stadium. Itís not like anybodyís saying, ďHey, play Siamese Dream in order and weíll come see you at the football stadium,Ē even if thatíd be a temptation that Iíd like to have.

I was wondering about the two trips you took across America, and how they informed the record. Was Ogilala written along the way?

Some of this record was written on the first trip, last year. I wrote another album on the second trip, but I havenít recorded it yet. Itís sitting there waiting.

What inspired you take the trips and document them in the first place?

Americaís this vast, confusing country, and if you stick your feet in the soil and get out on the open road, you start remembering Chuck Berry and Route 66 and the whole story of America being interwoven with rock and roll. As the country begins to move towards a more urbane focus, in terms of technologies and things like that, thereís still a lot of stories that arenít being told, that arenít about Elon Musk and his tunnel thing or whatever. I was raised an hour outside of Chicago, but I might as well have been 500 miles away Ė as far as I knew, the city was just this place way in the distance that I visited occasionally. That part of the world is one I feel I understand a little better, and when I get out there, it centres me. Thereís a lot of people there that donít care about the latest tabloid scandal, you know? It clicks me back into a bigger perspective, and a lot of my most famous songs were written about suburbia. I think thatís why they connected with a lot of people, because a lot of people live in the shadow of the big city, but youíre not there, youíre not hanging with the cool people, the people that are giving you a bad vibe because they see you as too dumb or too slow. Thereís something there, in that strip mall thing, that worked for me.

Do you feel as if youíve kept in touch with those places over the years, even as youíve toured so many big cities and experienced a degree of fame?


I think I have, but the two things are growing apart now more than ever. You get caught up in the urbanity propaganda, which is that ďWeíre cooler, weíre faster, we have new phones.Ē As youíve seen in the political situation here, a lot of people have suddenly stepped forward to say, ďWell, actually, thereís this whole other world out here, and we donít necessarily think in lockstep with your ideals.Ē It helps to remember that thereís a much bigger story. Youíve had it in the UK with Brexit. The technocracy thatís in place through these media conglomerates have shoved this message down our throats about globalism, and how weíre all going to hold hands in a big circle, and that someday weíll all live in peace, like the past never happened.

You donít think itís going to go down that way?

No, I just donít, and that doesnít mean it has to be awful Ė more that you have to take it as read that not everybody is at the table. When you do, at least for me, I click into a bigger version of America which is way messier and way louder, but also has a cooler, funkier history. Thereís a lot to be ashamed of, and a lot to be proud of, and if youíre willing to confront both sides of the coin, youíll understand more about the country. Iíve always had that attitude, of not wanting to be censored or sanitised. That was true even with alternative rock, with the band. We didnít want to be part of somebodyís perfect little indie army. We found that really distasteful.

The second trip you took, in January, was right around the time that Trump was inaugurated. Was that a coincidence, that you were going out into the sort of places that swung the election for him and talking to the people living there?

It was probably a coincidence, but that was what I was talking about all of last year. I literally would sit around tables with friends who were in the general liberal frame of mind and they would laugh at what was happening. They were missing the much bigger story going on. Call it what you want Ė populism, nationalism, cult of personality Ė these are big shifts, and they donít come along every season. Iíll give you a perfect example; I was just in the UK doing press, and I was having a drink with a guy Iím friendly with. He said that there wasnít one person in his social circle that voted for Brexit, and that it frightened him Ė you know, ďHow can I be living in such a bubble that I donít know that this other population exists?Ē Surely thatís dangerous for democracy. On these trips, and all through the presidential election campaigns, I was seeing that there was a disconnect between media messaging and the ground reality. Iím a person who would rather know the ground reality, even if I donít like it.

I remember on the first trip you were looking for fans to help connect you to people in those areas that might have a story to tell. How did that go?

I spoke to a lot of people. I was going to do a documentary. I put a mic in front of so many different faces, and Iíd ask them what their version of the American dream was, and so many of them would say that there isnít one. One fan set me up with his uncle, who was, like, eighty and had run a business. When somebodyís eighty years old and theyíre telling you thereís no American dream, you have to respect that Ė how did they arrive at that perspective? I got to people from every background, because I wanted to know. Iím not saying Iím a reporter, but writing songs is a form of reportage that goes all the way back to Leadbelly singing about the flood, you know? All the way through to Dylan doing it, and Neil Young doing it.

Did becoming a father have you thinking about your roots, too?

Well, yeah. Everybody from the older generations is gone now Ė my mother, my father, my grandparents. My grandmother just died around three years ago, at 102. They say a lot of things when youíre a kid that you donít understand, and suddenly, one day, you wake up and youíve got your own kid, and you realise that you have to try and figure out what it was they were trying to tell you, because itís valuable. Particularly in America, because weíre not as in touch with our own history here. The Chicago that I grew up in had a lot of immigrant families that lived in three generation homes; grandmaís upstairs, the kids are in the basement. Thatís kind of fallen apart, and when you have this diapora of families spread all over the place, when you put your grandparents in a retirement home, you lose that sense of living history. I donít want to forget my history Ė I want to be able to pass on an active family story to my son.

Are you still living in Chicago?

Yeah, and I was thinking about that a lot, too. That dovetails with the American dream, and my place within it as an artist. I can walk my own streets and feel like a bit of a ghost Ė I get more love in London or Tokyo than I do in my own town. So, thereís this thing of, ďWhy am I still here?Ē Am I hanging on to some ancestral idea of where home is, when itís irrelevant? All of this stuff about America seeped into the consciousness, and the writing, but how those forces play, and how they flip into the unconscious language of music...you got me. If I knew how to do it, Iíd do it all the time. Why am I singing about Civil War battles? I donít fucking know! So itís weird, but at least I can trace some of the influence.

ĎProcessionalí is the first time youíve recorded with James Iha since he was last a part of the Pumpkins. Why was that the track to have him chip in on?

He came to visit me when I was demoing some of the songs, just to hang out, and because he was sitting there I thought, well, fuck, Iím going to play some of them to him and get some feedback. He was very encouraging, and that encounter stuck with me, so when the record was almost done, and as Rick was saying that it was my last chance to add anything else, I sent James the whole album and told him to pick whatever he wanted, so that itíd be about what he was attracted to. He picked ĎProcessionalí and one other song that didnít make the album. I love the work he did, itís so cool.

Now that youíre on good terms with everybody from that classic lineup of the Pumpkins, is just maintaining those friendships the most important thing, before you start talking about maybe playing together again?

Well, the simple math for me is that when our personal relationships were good, we had a very effective musical one. Our disintegration was never over music, it was personal, so when those friendships fell apart, so did the band. So, the math then would be that if we ever wanted to make good music again together, you would hope that we wouldnít make the same mistake to think that we can do that without having peace with each other. That would be the intention. Whether or not it gets there, in the way that people like to romantically draw it up in their minds Ė I mean, I would love to be a part of that, but I donít have control over all the forces in play, and nor do I want to. Twenty years ago, I wouldíve been trying to mash this thing forwards, because it sounded big and exciting, and now I just think, if it happens, it happens. Iím all for it, but Iím not going to make the same mistake of dictating terms.

Iím guessing any reunion would need to revolve around new music, then? It wouldnít just be the Siamese Dream stadium tour?

[laughs] Well, first of all, we should be so lucky, and secondarily, thatís what interests me Ė that we go back to being a working band. I’m not into the Madame Tussauds version of the band. Iíd like to go back to being in a working band, and if that meant one record every five years, great. If it meant one record every ten years, great. At least weíd be making music, and doing so for the right reasons. Iíd just like to go back to being a working organisation, and if it was just about flipping one switch, Iíd flip it, but thereís other things that need to happen.

What about the future for Ogilala? Do you plan to tour it for a while?

I donít know. I mean, European promoters have been really unfriendly with me in the past few years. Everything Iíve pushed forward has had literally no interest. Hopefully, the record will be well enough received that there would be a demand. Rock and roll works best when itís an easy conversation, when you donít have to twist somebodyís arm to get shows booked, you know? Iíve played so few shows in the UK in particular in the last few years, itís not even funny. I think itís one show in four years. Itís strange that thereís been no interest after that amount of time...maybe you can put in a good word.

 
Forgotten Child is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-24-2017, 03:57 PM   #2
Ram27
Minion of Satan
 
Ram27's Avatar
 
Location: mayfair mistress of the satellites
Posts: 5,527
Default

Quote:
I’m going to play some of them to him and get some feedback. He was very encouraging, and that encounter stuck with me
awwww

i remember the story about james playing songs he wrote for bill in the 80s, bill was a dick and pissed off iha and they didn't speak for a while

 
Ram27 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 01:04 PM   #3
Grox
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Grox's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,583
Default

lol dude got bill's age wrong in the first sentence

 
Grox is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 01:20 PM   #4
bigoltitties
Pledge
 
Posts: 73
Default

Hasn't played Ireland in 10 years. Disgraceful. Can absolutely guarantee that it would sell out.

 
bigoltitties is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 03:31 PM   #5
Forgotten Child
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Forgotten Child's Avatar
 
Location: SP, Sao Paulo - Brazil
Posts: 1,442
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bigoltitties View Post
Hasn't played Ireland in 10 years. Disgraceful. Can absolutely guarantee that it would sell out.
I was expecting him to play at least one gig in Dublin with the In Plainsong tour, I'm sure he would fill-up a place like The Olympia (which is very similar in size and style to Koko in London) or The Academy. I had to fly to London to see the pumpkins in 2015 [?].

 
Forgotten Child is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 05:13 PM   #6
East Rocket
Ownz
 
Location: Denton Texas
Posts: 921
Default

"Everybody from the older generations is gone now – my mother, my father, my grandparents."

Billy's dad died? When?

 
East Rocket is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 05:23 PM   #7
Funbags
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Funbags's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,164
Default

He said on Stern that he's not talking to Bill Sr. because he doesn't care about Augie Jup.

Also; I'm guessing Iha will make an appearance in LA.

 
Funbags is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 09:07 PM   #8
T&T
Minion of Satan
 
T&T's Avatar
 
Location: montreal
Posts: 9,086
Default

look how healthy billy is doing, his dad is dead to him. LOL.

 
T&T is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-25-2017, 10:13 PM   #9
Pizza Club
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Pizza Club's Avatar
 
Location: you sound like a casual fan.
Posts: 3,378
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Funbags View Post
Also; I'm guessing Iha will make an appearance in LA.
APC is on tour

 
Pizza Club is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 02:13 AM   #10
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,422
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by T&T View Post
look how healthy billy is doing, his dad is dead to him. LOL.
tbh that probably IS healthy. his father sounds like a real piece of shit

 
teh b0lly!!1 is online now
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 02:24 AM   #11
FoolofaTook
Braindead
 
FoolofaTook's Avatar
 
Location: The Walla Wallaean Vale
Posts: 16,880
Default

what'd your father say to you when he reached right through you? did he say the things that he had learned from his father, too? so when do you become your own you become your own you? or are you just a shadow of something more

we are chinese boxes equal parts present and past where do I begin and end up? saw those old eyes staring right back at me

so tell me what you need I'll be watching out for you there are no enemies only dangerous friends you grew up very fast I didn't think I'd miss a thing 'cause nothing ever lasts

a wise old man a wise young fool a wise young man a wise old fool

try to understand (a wise old man, a wise young fool) (notice me, comfort me, understand me) just try to understand (a wise old man, a wise young fool) (notice me, comfort me, understand me)

what'd your father say to you to turn you cold? father never quite grew up he just grew old and if I was to say to you you know I love him still would you think less of me for hating me?

we are chinese boxes equal parts present and past we are so unconscious saw those old eyes staring right back at me

so try to understand I'm just like you, and you me exactly who I am might escape you always the fortunes of a man are the debts of the son, always

a wise old man a wise young fool a wise young man a wise old fool

 
FoolofaTook is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 02:25 AM   #12
FoolofaTook
Braindead
 
FoolofaTook's Avatar
 
Location: The Walla Wallaean Vale
Posts: 16,880
Default

I <3 Methusela

 
FoolofaTook is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 12:00 PM   #13
reprise85
Submortal
 
reprise85's Avatar
 
Location: Now, I'm not a professional psychologist, but I am an amateur psychologist. And I think that your spontaneous eye-watering may have something to do with your father.
Posts: 27,869
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teh b0lly!!1 View Post
tbh that probably IS healthy. his father sounds like a real piece of shit
agree

Quote:
Originally Posted by FoolofaTook View Post
I <3 Methusela
agree

 
reprise85 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 11:38 PM   #14
spliff0328
Pledge
 
Posts: 85
Default

I wanna hear the 2nd song he recorded with Iha that didn't make the album. Knowing Corgan, it's probably better than most of the songs on the album.

 
spliff0328 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-26-2017, 11:50 PM   #15
Ram27
Minion of Satan
 
Ram27's Avatar
 
Location: mayfair mistress of the satellites
Posts: 5,527
Default

absolutely agreed

 
Ram27 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2017, 01:21 AM   #16
Corgan's Bluff
Ownz
 
Corgan's Bluff's Avatar
 
Posts: 842
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by teh b0lly!!1 View Post
tbh that probably IS healthy. his father sounds like a real piece of shit
The drugs made him...

 
Corgan's Bluff is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2017, 02:12 AM   #17
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,422
Default

let's all agree to agree or disagree

but preferably agree

 
teh b0lly!!1 is online now
Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2017, 02:19 AM   #18
FoolofaTook
Braindead
 
FoolofaTook's Avatar
 
Location: The Walla Wallaean Vale
Posts: 16,880
Default

The lyrics on Towers are transcendent:

Nobody knows you
even if they pretend to
they're all sure they're all so clever

 
FoolofaTook is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-27-2017, 02:21 AM   #19
FoolofaTook
Braindead
 
FoolofaTook's Avatar
 
Location: The Walla Wallaean Vale
Posts: 16,880
Default

truth is rare as ivory
the truth is in their pure deceit
blessed in your naivete

 
FoolofaTook is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 01:25 PM   #20
brothahi4L
Oblivious Virgin
 
Posts: 31
Default

Hi Kids! I havenīt listened to processional on headphones yet. But honestly which part did IHA play? I donīt hear a second guitar - Did he play the acoustic main part? I guess not - So please help me hear IHas part

 
brothahi4L is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 01:39 PM   #21
smashingjj
is very perspective
 
smashingjj's Avatar
 
Location: my mother, my anus, mayfuck, his mother, reverting and cunt amoebes; the story of my life as a fisherman's wife on mars. now in stores. if you get it before may 30, you'll receive a free coupon to hand it in and get your money back.
Posts: 28,702
Angry

Quote:
Originally Posted by brothahi4L View Post
I havenīt
god dammit what did I just tell you in the other thread, brothahi4L? are you fucking ignoring me?

 
smashingjj is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 01:42 PM   #22
Forgotten Child
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Forgotten Child's Avatar
 
Location: SP, Sao Paulo - Brazil
Posts: 1,442
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brothahi4L View Post
help me hear IHas part

 
Forgotten Child is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 01:44 PM   #23
FoolofaTook
Braindead
 
FoolofaTook's Avatar
 
Location: The Walla Wallaean Vale
Posts: 16,880
Default

Better shape up bro. He's a mod you know.

Be careful.

 
FoolofaTook is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-28-2017, 05:50 PM   #24
Shadaloo
Ownz
 
Shadaloo's Avatar
 
Location: put those panties back on the line and get the hell out of my yard
Posts: 594
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FoolofaTook View Post
I <3 Methusela
Fuck yeah

 
Shadaloo is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 03:15 PM   #25
brothahi4L
Oblivious Virgin
 
Posts: 31
Default

I am really sorry. Did I write incorrectly? Obviously I don't get the problem? I just wanted to ask a question.

 
brothahi4L is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 03:28 PM   #26
Ram27
Minion of Satan
 
Ram27's Avatar
 
Location: mayfair mistress of the satellites
Posts: 5,527
Default

aww, don't worry. it's just the netphorian culture

yeah i can't hear the part either. maybe the little piano notes?

 
Ram27 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 03:31 PM   #27
Corgan's Bluff
Ownz
 
Corgan's Bluff's Avatar
 
Posts: 842
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by brothahi4L View Post
I am really sorry. Did I write incorrectly? Obviously I don't get the problem? I just wanted to ask a question.
Hi brotha? Obviously you are "funny" enough to get out...

 
Corgan's Bluff is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 05:38 PM   #28
Funbags
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Funbags's Avatar
 
Posts: 1,164
Red face

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pizza Club View Post
APC is on tour
Whoa! I didn't even realize they had an album out!

I suppose everyone's doing their own thing before getting back together next year.

 
Funbags is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 06:37 PM   #29
myosis
Minion of Satan
 
myosis's Avatar
 
Location: the institute
Posts: 5,053
Default

the james part seems to be during the chorus

 
myosis is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 10-29-2017, 07:22 PM   #30
fuzzyroes
Socialphobic
 
fuzzyroes's Avatar
 
Posts: 14,975
Default

Cool to hear Corgan sounding content and clear headed.

 
fuzzyroes is offline
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Google


Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
MTAE: album megathread pavementtune Smashing Pumpkins/Billy Corgan Discussion 1729 07-28-2015 10:27 PM
The Zeitgeist Mystery MEGA THREAD bunny Pumpkins Archive 334 01-27-2013 08:39 PM
Kick-Ass was a far better movie than I expected Nimrod's Son General Chat Archive 45 06-14-2012 06:02 AM
Monte: The new pumpkin queen? Sarcastic Smile Pumpkins Archive 53 11-24-2011 02:01 AM
Tracklisting for new Stone Temple Pilots album revealed WeilandFan Music Board Archive 33 03-23-2010 10:26 PM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:06 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Smashing Pumpkins, Alternative Music
& General Discussion Message Board and Forums
www.netphoria.org - Copyright © 1998-2014