Netphoria Message Board


Go Back   Netphoria Message Board > Archives > General Chat Archive
Register Netphoria's Amazon.com Link Members List Photo Album Mark Forums Read

 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-28-2012, 02:16 PM   #1
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default What is going on at Sasquatch

http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/61.../3/628x471.jpg

http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/61.../3/628x471.jpg

http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/61.../3/628x471.jpg

http://ww1.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/22...16/628x471.jpg

http://ww2.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/22.../3/628x471.jpg

http://ww2.hdnux.com/photos/13/31/22.../3/628x471.jpg

so where do i get those shitty racist head dresses i want to party with some young people and get some hippy sex shove a fucking tomahawk up some girl's asshole or something

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:24 PM   #2
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

It's funny that a lot of posts here are complaining about hipsters, considering that the kind of insufferable hyper-PC self-righteous douchebaggery so typical of hipsters pretty much defines this post and the supporting comments.

By this logic...

No one but blacks should wear a do-rag.

No one but Northern Italians should sing Opera

No one but Han Chinese should use guns- it's "offensive" because they were brutally subjugated by the Mongols who spread several chinese inventions, including gunpowder weapons, abroad.

Instead of pulling waving this smug, self-righteous "I'm acting offended so I can show the world how I'm a respectful person and if you don't agree you're racist" circlejerk in other people's faces, why aren't you protesting the Bureau of Indian Affair's ballchoking hold over the First Nations in the continent US? Because, you know, that's way more imperialistic and disrespectful than a few idiots wearing a fucking headdress.

Get over yourselves. Seriously.

Like

7 months ago
64 Likes

Annoyed

I am not a hipster, nor am I Native. I don't wear head dresses or Native regalia. In fact I am more than likely to laugh at a white dude wearing a Headdress because he/she is an idiot. I am however Irish. My culture was oppressed for centuries including after the immigration to the states. I could get upset about our symbols being appropriated into fashion trends. But I don't. A Scotsman could get upset about plaid being worn. I'm sure some of them do (not a single Scotsman I know does). A Roman Catholic could get offended by non Christians wearing crosses and I'm sure they do but no one looks twice at these fashion trends because they have been fully amalgamated into our society. That's just what happens. It's how culture works.

Like

7 months ago
29 Likes

Educate Yourselves

It might be "how the culture works" in your mind, but that doesn't make it okay. Furthermore, for people to recognize that is wrong and do it anyways to fit in to what they think the culture believes is just stupid. Second of all, I realize that the Irish suffered for what I'm sure a bandaid could cover, but instead of taking a a conversation about racism that is focused on a culture that in all of its history up until this very moment is still being persecuted, maybe the all mighty powerful whites could let someone else have the spotlight.

I'm sure your intentions were good in writing a comeback to this article, but you've literally forced your "whiteness" onto an argument and a culture that has no value for that. White skin gives you power and privilege that millions of people never experience as a result of their darker skin color or other "foreign" features. it isn't about wearing things as a representation of a culture, if Native Americans weren't STILL being tortured and people who were attempting to dress as one understood what they were doing then it would be different.

However we live in an age of society where no one chooses to educate themselves and they create this highly offensive blunders and thats the point. White people need to get over themselves and realize that when they don't acknowledge their privilege they take away so much from everyone else in the world. its up to them to use their privilege to help others and to equal out the playing field.

so please and thank you: stick this in your juicebox and really think about it.

Like

6 months ago
in reply to Annoyed
20 Likes

Shawnm

Though the Irish were oppressed in the United States in the past, I would point out that the Irish are not considered an oppressed population in our country anymore. Ireland still has tense relations with the United Kingdom due to war, discrimination, and continued violence, but as a part of the white culture in America, the Irish do not face the same problems modern Natives do. Further, many white Americans claim some sort of Irish descent (how many 'kiss me i'm irish shirts' have you ever seen?) but do not feel much of a connection to the culture and traditions of Ireland. Even those I know who are full or half Irish know little about their heritage outside of American history. Native Americans on the other hand, are more likely to be deeply connected to their history, because the oppression they felt in the past continues today in our white dominated culture, hence this article.
While I do agree that a Roman Catholic could be offended by a non Christian wearing a cross (as a white non Christian myself, I never would wear one), it is not the same as a white person wearing a headdress because, like the Irish, Catholic oppression and discrimination is not the problem that it used to be, especially when compared to the challenges faced by Native Americans today. The same applies to a Scot being offended by a person wearing plaid, but plaid is also no longer identified primarily with the tartan the same way a headdress is identified with Native culture or even a rosary is identified with Catholicism. Hopefully this clears some stuff up.

Like

6 months ago
in reply to Annoyed
16 Likes

Amber_lush

Completely understand. I am a Gumbayngirr woman (Aboriginal Australian) and consistently witness non- Indigenous people 'cherry picking' our culture for the juiciest bits, from adornments to spiritual beliefs and philosophies. Why is it so hard for people to accept that cultural appropriation and the subsequent innappropriate use of sacred objects is a real issue and cuts so deeply for people in cultures who have been relentlessly exploited and controlled over hundreds of years?

The fact that many of the responses from people are so immediately on the defensive really says something to me. Why are people so angry about being told that playing dress-ups with another cultures sacred/significant garments is not ok? How do you feel when an Indigenous person speaks out about this...look at you immediate response...what is it? If it is anger, ridicule or cyncism then why? if you forfeited a feather head-dress at halloween would that affect you so deeply? Would it feel so morally perverse to say 'ok, fine I accept that it is offensive, thanks for pointing it out, I'm sorry if I acted in ignorance...now moving right along...'

In my country the Aboriginal population is only 2% so why would it feel so annoying and ridiculous if this minority says anything at all really? Lets face it we are never going to hold enough power in mainstream culture to enforce much at all so when we do speak out about the things that are close to our hearts why the aggression?

What is even more interesting is that many dominant cultures have been violently enforcing the suppression of Indigenous culture for centuries. Our last official massacre was 1937, the bones of the Desert women were found on a back track scorched black far from family and homelands. In the Amazon people are still being violently hunted from resource rich land...and now its cool to paint up in ochre and endangered macaw feathers in every vogue magazine...come on people you gotta admit that there is a dichotomy here!

I love feathers, I love ochre and 'tribal' adornment but I can certainly live without a feather head-dress particularly if that contributes to the honouring and in the long run, enrichment of a unique and diverse culture. thats what I'm teaching my kids anyway...

Like

6 months ago
28 Likes

Euheduh

those "fringed hipster scarves" are actually keffiyehs, and that comment is actually hugely offensive.

Like

7 months ago
31 Likes

Kate Lasher

i really wanted one of those scarves to fit in with the mission rats until i figured that out... then i didn't want one anymore. it's depressing how something so politically important can lose its power when met with so much ignorance. plain, simple ignorance.

Like

7 months ago
in reply to Euheduh
6 Likes

Alex

How ironic that this blog is about cultural appropriation while she simultaniously does the same? Most of what this article touches on is valid (though I don't know that wearing a turquoise ring is "appropriation" any more than wearing plaid is an appropriation of Scottish culture or kimono sleeves are an appropriation of Japanese culture) but if you're going to talk the talk you have to walk the walk.

Like

7 months ago
in reply to Kate Lasher
13 Likes

Alex

Okay I knowit's only sort of related to the article, but I strongly reject the idea that white people are "boring." White people aren't just one big homogenous mass. When my parents immigrated to North America in the 70s they were both harassed, bullied and physically attacked by other white kids for not being white enough. We have different traditions, speak a second language and still preserve our culture. We are not just like everyone else, and many of the white people I know have other strong cultural heritages. Not all white people came over on the Mayflower, wiped out an indigenous culture or owned slaves. I'm not saying that means it isn't my responsibility to act in a respectful manner, or that the points brought up in this article aren't valid. I am saying don't lump me into your mass of ignorance and boredom and don't invalidate my cultural ties just because yours are lost.

Like

7 months ago
19 Likes

lauraokay

This was poorly written. The arguments lack necessary validity.
Moreover, an article like this needs to clearly elaborate on distinctions between what is appropriate and what is not, and then explain why it is through those reasons that people should take this article seriously. Because I did not. Too many holes. Needs more research.
If this person is studying cultural anthropology, s/he should probably go back to the basics. It is important to understand both sides, which was not adequately done.

Like

7 months ago
17 Likes

random person

Wait why are button down plaid shirts hipster? DAMMIT LEAVE MY GRUNGE CHILDHOOD ALONE. Seriously though, well written.

Like

7 months ago
17 Likes

Accipiter

I agree with about 99% of what's here, but it's important not to go after people who may wear something that appears to be Native American, but is for another purpose. For example, feathers in your hair. For many people (not just Native Americans), feathers have deep spiritual meaning. Wearing them in a warbonnet would be offensive, but wearing them in a general headdress would not. Native Americans were not the only cultures to wear feathers in the hair. It's not 'unique' to them, so please be careful before making widespread arguments against people wearing feathers in their hair.

Like

7 months ago
15 Likes

keona

I just wanted to say that I myself being 50% Native American do not find it offensive what so ever if someone chooses to wear native American inspired fashion. In fact I fully embrace it with my website:

nativevintage.com.

Why can't "hipsters" be inspired by our culture and want to wear fringe boots, turquoise, native patterned shirts, moccasins, feather jewelry, etc. if they chose to? I find no disrespect in that, I do agree if someone is doing it in a "blackface" sense, then it is wrong, however, most "hipsters" don't have that intention at all and do not think they're superior to native americans, they simply do it because it is a fad and they like it. most pictures tastefully (such as mine on my site of myself) simply are photoshoots that are trying to get a native american theme across. I wore a headdress because I think they're beautiful, it is fake because I can't afford a real one and have not earned the real eagle feathers.

To sum it up, I think you may be exaggerating the issue a bit or using hipster fashion as a bad example of people being racist.

Like

1 year ago
32 Likes

Sunflower

Just wanted to let you know that I sent this article to someone at my university who had emailed an invitation to an outdoor group's listserv that I'm a part of. The invitation was for an "island party" set to take place after a canoe trip. Participants were asked to wear "island spirit / indian" costumes. He replied with an apology for his ignorance and saying he was changing the costume theme to "just island." :P I hope he learned something. Keep up the good work!

Like

7 months ago
15 Likes

Malcolm Stumpf

So, i do agree with this. I'm just not sure where the line is. Is it offensive to let your kid be a samurai for halloween? There are still people who follow Bushido as a philosophy, and true Samurai lasted until the late 19th century. Though, letting a kid dress up as a Samurai is not letting them dress up as a 'Japanese person'. You aren't reducing the entirity of japanese culture to one way of life that doesn't exist anymore (although the teachings live on, as i mentioned). Is this the line? But in this case, would it be ok to let a child dress up as a native american warrior of some sort? But i guess that a samurai is far more it's own thing than just a 'warrior of a specific culture'. Arguably, so are some native warrior traditions but i doubt whatever kid that wants to be this knows those traditions.
My only worry with all this is i'm a strong believer that anyone can be their own culture (as in personal culture). Part of making culture is learning from and sometimes borrowing from other cultures. But i guess a head-dress is never really donned in an attempt to truly connect with a piece of native culture, because it's never done in a way even remotely reaching historical or cultural accuracy. A piece of real native jewelry or native inspired clothes that aren't costumes are more in line with the 'make your own culture' concept. Kinda like your kimono sleeves thing.

So hey, really answered my own question there. But this is all very interesting. I actually still have one thing, i can't decide if the Hollywood Voodoo thing is offensive or not. Voodoo and Voudoun are true cultures and religions that still exist in certain parts of America (and the fore-runners to these cultures still exist in parts of Africa and france). Mbut I just love that spooky Voodoo aesthetic so much. The fantasy 'N'orleans Bayou' is one of my favorite stock 'spooky' settings in cartoons and such. But in ways it does belittle true cultures. At what point is it ok to say 'i know this isn't really how it works, but this is fun' and at what point is it offensive?

Like

6 months ago
9 Likes

James

I want to address the commenter above who claims that, as a member of the majority culture, he doesn't have anything sacred. That's an honest and common misconception. I believe that this kind of insecurity is what leads to the kind of misappropriation written about in the post.

Minority cultures seem "special" to a lot of us well-meaning White folks. That "specialness" is partly an illusion created by contrast. If you're used to a lot of the same thing and you encounter something or someone different, it will appear alien, and depending on how you feel about your home culture, a natural automatic response is anything from xenophobia to xenophilia. Both lead to bias and discrimination if they're never developed.

I believe that a lot of clumsy gestures in the States are a result of White folks who feel rotten about how "boring" they are and, therefore defensive. This sometimes manifests itself in misplaced loyalty to a European nation you've never visited. Take some time to consider your own present-day culture. I'm talking about your family, your hometown, your community. What do you love about it? What shaped you as a person? What are the rituals that help you to feel like you're home? Those are your sacred cultural practices and artifacts. If someone found a way to corrupt them in your mind, you'd be upset. And if you let someone else know you felt upset, you'd have a right to hope they'd hear you out and find a way to accommodate when reasonable.

It's a blunder to wear a chicken feather headdress to a music festival, but it's one you've come by honestly if you've been raised participating in media that trivializes the things that others hold dear. But it's a blunder you can make right if you take the thing off and remember that that object means something to someone else. It's mean-spirited and stubborn not to. Calling people racists never really helps anything to change or heal, but if you're part of the power-holding majority in your home environment and you make use of the protection that affords you to maintain a single perspective, it's hard to know what else to call you.

Like

1 year ago
25 Likes

Latelilacs

Quit being a martyr. No one cares.

PS: You don't even look Native. You're probably mostly white anyways.

Like

7 months ago
7 Likes

Saje

I wouldn't go so far as to appropriate a headdress, or a facsimile thereof, but I did recently purchase a pair of moccasin boots or SF convention costume purposes because, first of all, it fits the time period I'll be working within (the premise being an alternate 19th century) and, second, they're astonishingly comfortable--something I've known since I was a kid and grew up wearing moccasins all summer rather than sneakers or cowboy boots like most of my neighbors at the time.

Probably not the same thing, given that, as far as I know, footwear doesn't have a sacred aspect to it. I'd never consider wearing native headgear in the first place. I like hats.

I do find it interesting you're so dismissive of the Irish/Celtic experience, especially since it so closely resembles that of the native peoples in many ways. I wouldn't be so forceful in demanding respect that you refuse to reciprocate. When one expects others to understand your perspective, it helps to show oneself willing to see things from another's.

Like

1 year ago
15 Likes

Photo Jeni

Jac I am with you. I find it truly offensive and honestly sad...especially to make a statement like "the closest I can get to my culture for now are the inexpensive imitations that I still find beauty and symbolism in if worn respectfully & tastefully".
Really? How would a kid at a show or a party ware a war bonnet tastefully and respectfully? Is "Fashion" the only way you feel connected to your culture? Do you know anything about your culture? I mean other than wanting to look "cool"? Have you even looked into the Native community where you live? Have you really tried? Why not go to a library, search out people in your community, LEARN about your tribe, ceremonies, culture, history, and then make your own regalia. They will have greater meaning than if some white lady buying cheap feathers from China slapped it together with a glue gun.

I am Yuchi and Cherokee, and I work at a Native Youth and Family center where I live. I am often having to educate people on appropriation, history, and historical pain that is still felt by Native people everywhere. It truly saddens me when I hear cop out comments by people and wish that thinking of our history before self gratification was the norm. It seems all to easy for folks with white privilege to forget the struggles of our ancestors and elders. To say it's ok for non-Indian people to ware sacred things, things meant for ceremony, that it is ok to make it their own feels like we really don't exist anymore. I tried to go to both your links and it looks like they do not exist or are broken.

Like

1 year ago
9 Likes

Anonymous

I routinely walk about in a pope hat just because it has religious/spiritual significance

Like

2 years ago
19 Likes

Benjamin Hancock

A question for the gang: at what point does a garment with feathers on it begin to be a headdress?
When it is "obviously "inspired?
More aptly, can one make a head garment with feathers which is sufficiently artistic that it isn't racist or offensive?
Is new creation possible in our culture? No: all creation is appropriated from the past...?

Like

10 months ago
6 Likes

Sharletrd

sure- look to New Orleans Mardi Gras for awesome inspiration on the use of feathers & headdress in a way that isn't a silly knock-off of a serious spiritual symbol. they do some incredible feathered costumes!

Like

7 months ago
in reply to Benjamin Hancock
3 Likes

E.J. Starbuck

I agree with Dana Deviant. I think this point of view is painfully old-fashioned. The Internet has created a melting pot of Ancient, Present, Past, and Future cultures from all around the world. And at this point, everyone is fully aware of what stereotypes are and what "PC" is, and going on about them is only going to perpetuate them. Practice sacred culture, don't preach it. Making efforts to keep sacred cultures segregated and separated in the name of respect and cultural preservation maybe honorable, but it is quite impossible and impractical. If that were the way, then the spirit of the Native American culture would be long dead, and we know that isn't true, it's just evolved. Everyone is connected and everyone is mixed, this is a new tribe of people. A handmade headdress (and not the dime store "cowboys and indians" plastic version) is sacred to anyone who wears it and certainly to anyone who makes it. To limit that sacred experience to Native Americans when people from every part of the planet have been using feathers as decorations on their heads all throughout history is just wrong.

Like

1 year ago
14 Likes

keona

Also I heard the argument that it is cultural appropriation from people accusing me of it in my picture of me wearing a headdress, however, the definition of cultural appropriation is the adoption of some specific elements of one culture by a different cultural group. Since I am half native, that argument goes out the window.

The second argument I heard was that only men can wear headdresses, that is not true. My culture specifically Powhatan nation has art & pictures dating back to the early 16 & 1700's of women wearing headdresses as well as modern day examples throughout many tribes I also found (pictured on our tumblr nativevintage.tumblr.com ).

the third and only other intelligent argument I heard is that my feathers are not authentic and not "earned", yes I agree, however I was not given the opportunity to grow up knowing my full native American father since he abandoned my mom and I when I was 2, so the closest I can get to my culture for now are the inexpensive imitations that I still find beauty and symbolism in if worn respectfully & tastefully.

any further rebuttals?

sincerly, nativevintage.com / nativevintage.tumblr.com

-Keona

Like

1 year ago
7 Likes

anonymous

I realize this comment is coming kind of late. Recently I've noticed a lot of people wearing feather hair extensions, and I was wondering if you had any problem with this kind of trend. It's not quite the same as wearing an Eagle feather or something sacred, but it's likely that the inspiration for this trend (also in earrings and jewelry) came from Native American symbols. Is there a distinction between that kind of trend (where people take dyed rooster feathers that are sort of general and decorative) and appropriating something sacred/ wearing full headdresses that are a more clear reference to native cultures when it comes to what people should not wear? Do you think all feather-wearing is appropriation? What would you say to someone, perhaps a biologist who likes birds for example, who claimed to have no desire to "play Indian"? Do you think all feather-wearing people are appropriating Native American traditions when they wear feathers? Does it depend on the context of the rest of their ensemble and which feathers they wear? (I agree that a full headdress is pretty straight-up appropriation and it disgusts me; I'm just curious about how you feel about using feathers as decoration in general.)

Like

7 months ago
3 Likes

alex wilson

Hi-Great site. I have to clarify something though-- headdresses were not, and still are not, just worn by men in First Nations cultures. Women have always worn them, and still do today. There is of course sexism and misogyny in Aboriginal communities as well, so perhaps that is where the misunderstanding comes from. Most importantly though, women were not allowed to be Chiefs under Federal policy, until recently, so that is why there isn't much info out there about it. Keep up the good blog.
alex

Like

9 months ago
4 Likes

Angel H.

The racist douchebags in your comments section who are exactly the reason posts like this need to be read. Mind if I link?

Like

1 year ago
5 Likes

MaeDecember

I have been reading up on not only your blog, but also a few other ones for a few weeks trying to educate myself.

I wouldn't be one to wear a headdress for the hell of it, but I did once dress up as an "indian" for Halloween when I was ten. I have a really hot black top that's got a dream-catcher dangling from it, and a necklace that I have no idea what it's called, but I bought it in Arizona and it had a picture of a native American on it.

That's about as far as I've taken it, but it was in absolute ignorance, because I never thought to ...well...think more of it. I've been having a hard time understanding to the full extent that doing this is offensive because you could fill up a library with things I don't know about the native culture. But my God am I trying. I'm trying to decide what to do with the necklace and dream-catcher top, in the meantime I won't wear them until I know exactly what it means to wear them, and if I'm even allowed to, really.

I've also been informing my 13-year Ke$sha/lady gaga loving sister of these things so that she doesn't follow indie trends and offend anyone.

This is me attempting to show you that ...you changed at least two people. One in LA..one in Mexico.

Thanks.

Like

1 year ago
8 Likes

Katlin

This post is incredible. =) I am an enrolled member of the Cherokee Indian and over half in blood degree. I am currently in the practice of reverting back to my cultures traditional religious beliefs. I disagree with the people here who are claiming Native American culture is alive because of white people perpetuating it, as well as those claiming a headdress is sacred to a non-Indian and that there is no culture anymore. Try telling the thousands of Native Americans in America that they have no culture anymore. Also, if an Irish person were to claim St. Pats day is just for them I would completely step aside and allow them their practice. You can't compare Native culture to Christmas or Halloween because no one is stepping forward and claiming these dates as exclusive to one culture. What is also offensive is hipster art that consists of people placing a headdress on a white girl and calling it art. There is even a group on facebook for this now!If you are a white person and are arguing there is no culture it is because you do not have one you have chosen to honor.

Like

1 year ago
5 Likes

solsolsol

Consequently, nobody OWNS any culture, so you might as well give up defending it. Persecute and do not tolerate the racist douchebags sure, but trying to zealously protect a culture from everyone else is far from realistic.

Like

2 years ago
6 Likes

vegn

Since you seem a bit clueless on the keffiyeh/shemagh thing:

"The black-and-white keffiyeh is a symbol of Palestinian heritage. The red-and-white keffiyeh is worn throughout these regions as well as in Somalia, but is most strongly associated with Jordan, where it is known as shemagh mhadab. The Jordanian keffiyeh has decorative cotton or wool tassels on the sides It is believed that the bigger these tassels, the more value it has and the higher a person’s status. It has been used by Bedouins throughout the centuries and was used as a symbol of honor and tribal identification.The tasseled red and white Jordanian and Palestinian shemagh is much thicker than the red and white shemagh used in the Gulf countries (no tassels). In Yemen it is used extensively in both red-white and black-white pattern and some traditional Yemeni designs and colours.Multi colored tribal shemagh were used widely before the 1950's. Nowadays these are mostly worn in Yemen and Oman only while in the Gulf and Levant the black/white red/white or pure white styles succeeded. The shemagh is part of an ancient Middle Eastern headgear tradition."

Like

1 year ago
3 Likes

HarryBoBarry

Amin. Not to be rude. BUt I'm kind of curious, where would you go? ANd I can't find the comment now but I completely agree with the person who gave the "white people feel they are boring" explanation. Now on to my main question. Does this apply to blues music? is it wrong then for me as a white person to play or listen to blues music? I'm honestly curious about this since I am a musician and I'm white.

Like

1 year ago
3 Likes

don't agree 100% with you

so how to you feel about spell and the gypsy collective? they're white women, hippies, whose business is native inspired jewellry & headbands and kimonos.

http://spelldesigns.com/catego...

Like

6 months ago
1 Like

lucky

I agree with everything you've said about cultural misappropriation, but if the "fringed hipster scarf" you're referring to is actually a keffiyeh, then you're guilty of it as well.

Like

2 years ago
5 Likes

Breakinglimits2

Is it ever okay to buy a headdress but NOT wear it? I am curious by this. Obviously, running around and wearing it as a fashion statement is disrespectful, but what if you have it in a very respectful manner and just have it because they're beautiful? Or is that still not even okay? I feel most discussions are about wearing them and I am curious about just having it.

Like

7 months ago
1 Like

Ginny

Ah thanks so much for this. I see this popping up in the city and it upsets me because it is very disrespectful.

I'm Native American decent (Blackfoot tribe) and I take pride being descended from them (even if it's a little bit). It's just really sad and stupid to see a culture gone 'mainstream' for fashion purposes.

Like

8 months ago
1 Like

Ichael

Just curious, I can see that me wearing a headdress would offend you, but is there any small daily act that you would consider honoring? As an average young middle-class white male I don't really have sacred things. I despise all the hate perpetrated by Christians. I know I live white privilege every day. As a stranger, is there a simple display that WOULD make you feel honored?

Like

2 years ago
3 Likes

Dianna Baldwin

Sorry I still disagree. Native people are not immigrants. They still live in America. They all have individual cultures that are still preserved and practiced. You might want to do a little research on American Indian cultural practices. Headdresses are reserved as a high honor. American Indian culture is valid. I practice the culture I was brought up with and it does not resemble "USA culture" as you seem to understand. I honestly take your comments as being just as disrespectful as hipsters wearing headdresses and with all good intentions cannot continue a conversation with someone who just wants to get a rise out of others. It's the internet phenomenon that sometimes encourages the kind of behavior that dismisses any opportunity to learn about other perspectives.

Like

2 years ago
3 Likes

Anonymous

It's incredibly annoying when people think that protecting one's culture is limiting their free speech. They're frightened that by by claiming responsibility for living in a racist culture they might change the system which gives them leverage. Clearly, carving a pumpkin does not offend anyone, and Easter makes white owned corporations hell of money while promoting the sweet side of Christian domination and imperialism, so no one is offended by that either. Cultural appropriation hurts when it doesn't profit the culture, it's people, and simply amuses the rich and white who have white privilege. Get it right, people. We live in a racist society. It's not stepping on my toes to do what I can to respect others. What lifts others up is what lifts me up. Although white people don't need to be lifted anywhere. We need to be humbled.

Like

2 years ago
3 Likes

Anonymous

"I'm won't even get into the appropriation and "secularization" of sacred religious holidays like Easter and Christmas."

Since these Christian observances themselves appropriated and attached themselves to earlier cultural celebrations, I'm not sure there's a really solid case to be made against re-secularizing a practice originally based on folkways and beliefs.

I come from a culture that appeared to formally adopt Christianity in the 13th century (fire and sword were convincing arguments), but which still practices some of its folk beliefs up to this time. I was raised as a European Christian, plus folkways.
So, I could get bothered by elves being introduced into the Christmas narrative, or I could get bothered by the Christian appropriation of my ancient culture, the colonization of my ancient homeland by a series of dominant military powers, the forced assimilation and relocation of my people even during the second half of the twentieth century, the brutal suppression of my culture and the deliberate, state-organized genocide by the occupying powers.

Argh, what is the point I set out to make? That these questions are more multi-layered than we might at first suspect. And as with an onion, every time we peel away a new layer, there's something to make us cry.

Like

2 years ago
3 Likes

Rob

Headdresses: Made of revered feathers and specific to Plains Indians. Fedoras: Not made of anything revered and generic to all Westerners. The two aren't comparable.

A lot of hipster headdresses clearly are the real thing. Or close enough to be indistinguishable to the average layperson. For instance, Kesha's. What do you have to say about those, Mike?

As for phony headdresses that resemble children's playthings, they don't have the problem of abusing actual feathers. But they do have the related problem of mocking or trivializing an Indian practice. They create the impression that a chief is anybody who wears a colorful headpiece.

An analogy may help. Headdress-wearing hipsters who carouse and get drunk are like mitre-wearing hipsters who pretend to abuse altar boys. Legally they could do it, but Catholics would be right to feel offended. The hipsters would be mocking or trivializing something Catholics revere.

The point you haven't touched is that wearing a fedora doesn't contribute to a centuries-old pattern of harmful racial stereotyping. Wearing a headdress does. That alone makes it wrong.

A comparable act would be hipsters dressing consistently as conquistadors until people believed all whites were greedy plunderers. Or dressing consistently as Klansmen until people believed all whites were violent racists. Needless to say, that hasn't happened. Society would rightly condemn anything like that as a false and malicious stereotype.

Like

2 years ago
3 Likes

Idi 'Big Daddy' Amin

I hope anybody who indulges in this kind of ludicrously offensive cultural larceny receives an inoperable tumour at the base of their spine.

Adrienne, I totally agree with your outrage at your cultural heritage being exhumed and made to dance for kudos by clueless hipster fashionista douchebags. I'm a white guy, and in my mind the genocide of America's Native population is the worst atrocity in human history.

The thing is, as if that weren't bad enough, there seems to be no respect for--or even memory of--what European settlers and later white Americans did to Native Americans. In almost every facet of modern American life, Native history is trampled and disrespected: from that murdering criminal prick Andrew Jackson's presence on the $20 bill and the grinning, caricatured logo of the Washington Redskins--how is that still an acceptable team name in the 21st century? Imagine a team called the Alabama Darkies--to that 5,700-foot "fuck you" to the Lakota known as Mount Rushmore. It's enough to make you want to puke into your soup.

I genuinely dream of the day that a Native American president is elected. I foresee his inauguration speech going something like this:

"Right, you lot: out."

Like

1 year ago
2 Likes

Anonymous

Oh please, the world of the Hipster is an impenetrable island-universe that where these petty exercises in politics have no real place; Ours is a citadel fit only for the purity of art and if you can't wrap your tiny mind around that, I have some Jack Kerouac that you really ought to read.

Like

1 year ago
2 Likes

Jac

@ Keona; With your last paragraph you exemplified one of the very points the author of this blog/article made, "you will be very hard pressed to find a Native artist who is closely tied to their community making headdresses for sale. See the point about their sacredness and significance".
So silly

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

Rosa

Thank you for this wonderful post. I have a hipster sister, and as of yet have not been able to articulate why she is being offensive by wearing certain pieces of clothing.
I am Canadian, so the issues are slightly different, but not by much. And I know that Americans can feel threatened by posts like yours, which I find silly. If a kid grows up watching and hearing racist tv programs, movies, and general statements from those around him/her, does that mean it's ok to be racist as an adult? Absolutely not! If we don't know that we're doing something wrong, then it's still not ok to do it. And when you learn that it's offensive, then stop! Unless you're looking for a fight... which I guess some people are...
My policy is this: everything you do/wear/eat/watch/like, you should know the "why" of. Why do you like it? Why do you eat it? Why do you celebrate it? Why would you think that wearing feathers in the style of Native Americans is interesting and fashion-forward?
I am Polish/Canadian, and I do not agree with cultural appropriation.
Thanks again for saying what I couldn't even begin to talk about.

Like

1 year ago
2 Likes

Mary

Thank you for this.

I was born in Hong Kong, of Chinese descent, have lived most of my life in Canada, and cultural appropriation speaks to me as well. I hated the mid-90s trend of Chinese-style gowns in Western culture. These reductive "fashions" do nothing for us - we should be standing in solidarity instead!

Like

1 year ago
2 Likes

Dana Deviant

I'd have to agree with Dane, there is no culture anymore. We actively exploit it to what end I don't know. I mean for gods-sake Prince Harry can wear a Nazi Uniform to a dress up party. It is idealist to think that YOUR culture and YOUR cultural item won't be exploited for fashion or social comment, when all other culture is exploited to. This generation (in the west anyway) and all others to come to have freedoms, socially, economically and morally that no angry blog is going to curb or undo. Save your breath.

Carly

Like

1 year ago
2 Likes

solsolsol

For cultural appropriation to exist there has to be a specific culture in question. The terms black/white/Asian and native American are NOT cultures. There are Indian (or native american) NATIONS! living in the overarching culture of United states of America. Thus, culture is colorless, has no ethnicity, no religion, no race etc.

Like

2 years ago
2 Likes

Dianoguy

Well written post! I understand your objections and tend to agree with most of them.

I'm curious, though, where we can draw the line. Most St. Patrick's Day traditions mock the Irish (originally a shunned immigrant group). Carving pumpkins on Halloween is a direct appropriation of a practice with specific religious intentions. Popular secular culture has drastically adopted the sacred (to Christians) symbol of the cross, to tattoo it onto their bodies and string gaudy gold version around their necks just because it's trendy. (Christians would find any rapper rapping about his b****es and h*s with a cross around his neck utterly insulting.)

I'm won't even get into the appropriation and "secularization" of sacred religious holidays like Easter and Christmas. And it is a very debated topic at the moment, but Muslims strongly object to any visual representation at all of the Prophet, while cartoonists and others insist that this is a silly restriction for the majority of the population to have to abide by.

Clearly, almost anything you do or say could offend somebody. When does your right to have your culture/religion/ethnicity/history respected override my right to free speech?

Like

2 years ago
2 Likes

Mel Sherman

This was a great post. I actually went through and reported that facebook page because I understand how it is just like blackface. It's wrong and you can see that the only people who are fans are clueless hipsters who wouldn't understand racism if it sat on their head...literally.

Like

2 years ago
2 Likes

Mike Cooke

Well, your points are valid. But I'm not sure they really tackle the actual problem.

If an Indian wears a fedora, are they insulting my Anglo heritage? Are they ethically wrong?

The answer is 'no'. Indeed, the Indian wearing a fedora could be interpreted as having his culture attacked and diminished by the dominant 'anglo' culture.

To get to the real issue, it's this: as a child I played 'Cowboy and Indian', I watched 'westerns', read 'western' comics. The depiction of Indians in those media may have been prejudiced, but I was born into a culture that includes popular ideas of what Indians are.

I understand the righteousness in education and demanding respect for your your people(s). But can you understand the appropriation has already happened and exists now as the American cultural commons artists have a right to?

Which is not to say I want to wear a headdress myself. But I see nothing wrong with a 'hipster' wearing a headdress inspired by Indian headdresses but clearly not the real thing. Had Native Americans had their treaties respected and today held economic and military power to rival the United States - do you suppose you might agree?

Like

2 years ago
2 Likes

Amber_lush

Is a fedora sacred? Is worn only by initiated men? If a woman wore even out of jest could she be very likely punished either by her own people or by the spiritual deities revered by that culture?

No, I didn't think so.

You missed the point...its not about the actual physical article, its about the cultural significance embedded in that object...you wouldn't dare go to a many countries and muck around with male religious/sacred head-wear, so why do you feel that it is ok in your own country, even if its 'not the real thing'?

So if you can acknowledge the predjudice you were born into, assuming you have an understanding about and empathy for those it marginalises, why would you perpetuate these veiws by defending appropriation?

What people are really saying when they talk about 'amalgamation' or 'integration' of Indigenous people/culture/icons into mainstream culture is 'this country has been/is being colonised..deal with it!'

Like

6 months ago
in reply to Mike Cooke
3 Likes

Arilou

I should note that wearing sacred symbols when "dressing up" isn't that uncommon, there are indeed clerical vestments availible for Halloween (as well as nun habits, and other kinds of ceremonial dress)

I'd assume the most cogent comparison would be with king/queen dresses though? People might not remember it much, but royal regalia *is* sacred.

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

gemarina

I like this post, but I have to agree with other commenters that by this time cultural appropriation is far too rampant for it to be truly offensive anymore. It's basically all that hipsters do, although it originated with taking working-class culture or something. (And that culture's pretty oppressed, just not necessarily minority enough to be offended.) It was sort of inevitable that hipster appropriation would hit up other cultures too. I hope that you don't lose any sleep over the hipster wardrobe, it's really not worth the worry.

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

Kelly Hogaboom

This is excellent! Thank you for putting the time and work into it.

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

Adrienne K.

Since two people have mentioned the "fringed scarf", I'll clarify that it's not keffiyeh. I have two of these (Note: That is not me, I google image searched). I actually talk about the keffiyeh comparison in this post. It's definitely something I can see exploring further. Thanks for your comments!

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

Alison

"If the 'fringed hipster scarf' you're referring to is actually a keffiyeh, then you're guilty of it as well."

I was thinking the same thing when I read that.

Like

1 year ago
1 Like

solsolsol

Thank you ermes for confirming my point that nobody "owns" their culture - there's too much variations and too many similarities of the human kind in various cultures around the world for anyone to claim anything. I hope that Ms. Baldwin actually got the point here as well. And again, Indian tribes/nations have no cultures, just like Irish immigrants in America have no culture. The one culture that unites us is the USA culture, and that culture is the only relevant one in this conversation.

In other news, hipsters are still douchbaggerly posers.

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

Dianna Baldwin

http://www.keshasparty.com/us/...

Just thought I'd share! She looks like an idiot...and so do other hipsters who where headdresses. It is not original, it is not ironic, it's pathetic. I'm sorry solsolsol but I disagree. Native people own their individual cultures just like you own your individual dismissive attitude. I could steal it from you, but then it might be deemed as mockery...oh it's funny how things happen...Great blog btw Adrienne!

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

Dianoguy

ayoungethan --

I understand your points. I certainly didn't think the original poster was advocating making hipster headdresses illegal, nor am I advocating such a thing, I hope you didn't think I was implying that...

Certainly, if my Irish-American friends were feeling offended by something I was doing I'd happily listen and adjust my behavior to avoid offence. I'd say the same for blackface, or headdresses (after reading this article), or doodling Muhammed around my Muslim friends, or anything like that.

Definitely don't think of myself as a "spokesperson" for Christianity... perhaps I should have prefaced that statement with "In my experience, I have found that..." Also, as a Christian (and not a very conservative one, at that) I *am* able to tell you what offends me and the Christian friends/family I am in contact with.

Sorry for providing "weird" examples, it was the best I could come up with on the spur of the moment. Thinking of a less weird example... how about corny Cinco de Mayo celebrations, with cartoon-character-shaped pinatas, cheesy sombreros and fake mustaches? I think given Arizona's recent legislation, that certainly is trivializing a culture that is currently in danger of being discriminated against.

What I was intending to ponder (but expressed very poorly, it seems), was... where do we draw the line? That is... it very much depends on the individual whether a given activity/words come across as a light-hearted *celebration* of a culture, or a insulting "appropriation" of the culture. How do we decide how something is going to come across?

I think that's a question that both sides need to be aware of... the celebrant of a culture who might be way too callous about how they're come across, and the cultural member who might be overly sensitive to any efforts of others to engage in and celebrate their culture. (Note that I'm speaking here of culture... the situation becomes more sensitive when we're specifically discussing sacred/religious aspects of a culture, as I understand now headdresses fall into.)

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

Term Papers

I have been visiting various blogs for my term papers writing research. I have found your blog to be quite useful. Keep updating your blog with valuable information... Regards

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

misee

Mike,

The comparison of classic westerns of an earlier time and hipsters wearing headdresses that represent a caricature of a minority in the much more educated and culturally aware society we have now isn't really valid.

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

laura gayle

Wonderful post. While I can't claim my first nation roots (see the tangle around Virginia's history with Native Americans), I want to respect and honor those forebears. Respecting them does not give me license to wear a sacred and ceremonial item.

Keep writing!

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

Mimi

This is a wonderful series of rebuttals! Thank you, I'll be making a note of it over at Threadbared!

(On a less serious note, I think it's hilarious that you had to add the "hipster disclaimer," presumably for all those who felt that the recent slew of posts have unfairly defamed this figure. Also, I love that you mention Zeitgeist to do so!)

Like

2 years ago
1 Like

Sharletrd

Really well-said! As a non-native working with the Snoqualmie Tribe on the West Coast, I have recently been researching/making regalia for Canoe Journey and Dance Ceremonies. The importance of each piece and each symbol is very hard to communicate. But it is important enough that we spent many many hours just doing research and visiting museum archives to understand exactly how things were made. And one of the sad facts is that there are very few authentic pieces to look at. Outlowing Dance and Ceremony was one of the ways that many Tribes were suppressed. Bringing back traditions in a respectiful way is a work of dedication and spirit, not just fashion.

Like

7 months ago

Racheledwards8191

Unfortunately nothing Tribal is sacred anymore. Just like Tribal tattoos. Here in Australia EVERYONE has them, even though probably 50% of the people with them have no link to the original islander tribes that used them originally. I can understand why it upsets you, but I'm sorry thats just how it is. And it isn't just your tribe. I have a friend who is Greek who has always worn the "evil eye" jewelry, and now all of a sudden "evil eyes" are hugely fashionable. Its just a phase and it'll die out. I'm sure there are other bigger problems out there for you to fret about than a bunch of teenagers wearing headdresses.

Like

7 months ago

purejuice

oohhhh grrrl.

Like

7 months ago

cindiasaurus

I loved Keona's response! Mad props.

Like

1 year ago

BP

I love your blog and how well written it is in terms of laying out the issues of native appropriation.

If you don't mind I have taken this post in particular and put it on my blog crediting you as author. You can check at http://www.abp.tumblr.com

If you are at all uncomfortable with that and would like me to remove it or just want to contact me please do so at alinap@gmail.com

Thanks!

Like

1 year ago

ianthevedge

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...

Like

1 year ago

Naomi

Yeah, Native American culture would be long dead if it weren't for helpful white people ripping it off. Ridiculous.

Like

1 year ago

Metak

duh, LINKED your blog. Clearly you don't mind if I LIKED your blog. I can't type. I should be banned from blogging.

Like

1 year ago

Metak

I just want to thank you for this amazing post. Although you are talking about NATIVE appropriations, I think the reasoning you explain here applies to virtually any situation of appropriation of sacred objects for fashion. I hope you don't mind that i liked our blog, Overlooking Tibet to here, because I felt that your explanation of why wearing a sacred object is inappropriate was better than anything I could write! Our post is here:
http://overlookingtibet.blogsp...

We have so many similar situations, these shoes are the tip of a massive iceberg (One which you also brought up in your great Bay to Breakers article). Anyway, thank you for your amazing writing. I hope you don't mind that we used you as a reference.

Like

1 year ago

erinhazel

How do you feel about African tribal prints and patterns that have resurfaced every couple of years in the fashion world since colonialism and slavery first began? Those textiles and accessories don't take into account the diversity of tribes and peoples of Africa OR the oppression of them.

But I bet I'd be hard pressed to find a handful of people in this comment forum who don't own something African-inspired (like animal prints, "loud"/colorful patterns, jewelry, home decor, etc) -- that wasn't actually made in Africa or sold free trade.

I find a more valid comparison between headdresses and African tribal fashion, than of headdresses and blackface. I'm curious what you think about it.

Like

1 year ago

Robin

I just wanted to say that I love this. I disagree with what some commenters say- I think people are trying to frame "being" as "owning" in order to justify cultural appropriation, which is awful. Plus it's like, do you really NEED to offend people in order to be fashionable? Aren't there plenty of other routes you could go? Really, people?

I live in Boston, too- let's be friends! XO

Like

2 years ago

Aries

awesome! have you read Andrea Smith's "Spiritual Appropriation as Sexual Violence"?
I think you'd like it

Like

2 years ago

ermes

I definitely agree that cultural misappropriation is insulting and abhorrent. That said, I am a modern Pagan living in North America with no Native ancestry whatsoever. Symbolism associated with the animals, plants and other spirits of this land are nonetheless sacred to me. Feathers, animal skins, head-dresses, masks, etc, while often associated with Native spirituality, are hardly exclusive to it. I personally find no objection to a feathered head-dress being worn to honor and connect with the aerial or sky dwelling spirits, provided it is done exclusively in a sacred context, and does not pretend to associate to other Native symbolism (such as art motifs, etc). While many Native peoples may object to it, the fact is that there is much in common (in spirit) between Native spirituality and other forms of Paganism around the world. Many of the important sacred symbols have their parallels in other places aswell, including the head-dress, corn-masks, animal pelts, jingle dresses, and so forth. Modern Pagans often (having little other choice) innovate along the same themes for similar sacred (rather than cultural) purposes. Perhaps some day we can all celebrate our differences together in the light of our remarkable similarities. With Respect!

Like

2 years ago

Dianoguy

Incidentally, my wife is one-quarter Native American (Ojibwe and Cherokee). (Not highly relevant to the topic -- just saying I'm not a total stranger to this conversation.)

Like

2 years ago

elorie

Gosh, Dane, thanks for demonstrating why there's a crying need for blogs like this and education on the topic in general. Get on with your special self!

Like

2 years ago

Dane

Need some cheese with this whine!

P.S.>>> it's 2010. there is no culture anymore. you should just be happy people still think of natives when they see a head-dress.

Like

2 years ago

ayoungethan

Dianoguy -- False dichotomy. Who says we can't defend someone's right to use their speech in racist, disrespectful and idiotic manner even as we lecture, shame and (all else failing) ridicule them for their privileged racist idiocy? Did the original poster call for making hipster headdresses illegal?

Privileged people acting racist don't have to stop doing what we are doing. But they can expect to hear MY "free speech" concerning their privileged racist idiocy.

Your final question itself is based in privileged defensiveness insisting that someone else's free speech pointing out your racist idiocy is somehow an "infringement" upon your freedom to speak. Free speech is not expecting the people you are offending to bite their own tongues or emotionally baby you.

Plus, the Irish are not a categorically oppressed population now (we're talking 24/7/365), so that and other examples are WEIRD. HOWEVER, if any of my or your Irish(-American) friends starting voicing concerns and feelings that they felt others were mocking and disrespecting their culture during St. Patrick's Day, would you listen and validate or would you dismiss and silence?

Interesting statement, "Christians would..." ...any other categories of people you've appointed yourself as spokesperson for?

For the record, I share your concern about the "secular appropriation" (a euphemism for capitalist commodification) of religious days. I think it is disrespectful and classist, and that it ultimately sucks the meaning out of our cultural traditions and leaves us emptier.

But it's not poor people -- it's wealthy, mostly men, mostly white or otherwise privileged who are making these decisions to dismantle a less powerful culture for our personal gain.

Like

2 years ago

crunkbunny

Coachella, this year. Hipsters with headdresses. Sold inside the front gate. Everywhere, the whole weekend.

Like

2 years ago

Stephen

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v...
Look out everyone! It's gone mainstream!

Like

2 years ago

Rob

As you may know, I discussed this fine posting in my blog. Mike Cooke came up with an interesting counterargument that led to another round of debate.

Mike went into his "cultural commons" argument and I disassembled it. I'd say he doesn't have a leg left to stand on.

You may be interested in this debate because it's an extension of your original position. I'd love to hear your take on our respective arguments.

Here it is:

Stereotypes Okay in "Cultural Commons"?

Like

2 years ago

julia aka garconniere

thanks so much for linking my article! i'm glad to be a part of this conversation.

Like

2 years ago

Anonymous

yea another reason to avoid coachella, drunk kids wearing war bonnets. you know you have to be a "warrior" to make it from the main stage to the water mist hut in 100 degree weather, with a colored sugary drink.

Like

2 years ago

Anonymous

http://www.tinanded.com.au/pro...

Like

2 years ago

Adrienne K.

@mimi I'm so glad someone appreciated the disclaimer and Zeitgeist reference. And thanks for your initial post at Threadbared!

@Sheena sure thing! I really liked your article. I also fixed the post so the links at the bottom look better, so hopefully it'll give you even more traffic.

Like

2 years ago

Sheena Louise

Thanks for the shout-out! I'm so glad you liked my article as I was really nervous about publishing it. It's definitely gotten a lot of response though, so that's all I can ask for.

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:27 PM   #3
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

Starla you probably already bitched about this right

I mean brought it to our attention

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:28 PM   #4
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

Hey check this slut out

http://www.mediaindigena.com/wp-cont...headdress1.jpg

WE SMOKUM PEACE PIPE TOGETHER!

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:30 PM   #5
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

Non-native hipsters, I know that native imagery is trendy right now, that your friends are wearing it and the blogs and magazines you read are telling you to join in the fun. But when you and I look at those dreamcatcher earrings at the mall, I’m pretty sure we see different things. So I’d like to take a few minutes of your time to share my perspective, as a real live native person. Maybe in exchange for wearing my culture on your chest, you could allow me to suggest a slight re-jigging of your fashion trend.

I come from a family of artists, so I appreciate the aesthetic value of our artwork. My family is full of carvers, weavers, dancers, and singers. I’m lucky that way. But it isn’t just luck that allowed these artforms to be practiced today, it is years of political struggle and resistance.

For close to 100 years, in an effort to get rid of “the Indian problem” in Canada, the Indian Act made it illegal for us to practice our traditions. You see, non-native hipsters, your ancestors wanted to obliterate us in order to clear up the land for colonial expansion, and getting rid of our artforms and cultural practices was at the heart of those efforts. It was only the mid-1950s that this was written out of Canadian law, so that my relatives were no longer imprisoned for using our masks, blankets and other regalia in ceremonies.

I know you probably didn’t learn this in school, but it is a part of the local history that accompanies native culture. Each Indigenous culture around the world has its own history of suppression, its own story of resisting attempts to obliterate them so that industrial capitalism could flourish. Hey, you in the sweater — do you know what it took to maintain Cowichan knitting practices in the face of residential schools, intense poverty and assimilative policies?

Separating native people from our culture, and the politics and history from the images, serves to erase us. It makes it easier for native people like me, and the woman who knitted that sweater, to remain marginalized and silent while our imagery becomes a consumer object as part of mainstream culture. This is an old tactic, part of broader political efforts to forget the history of colonialism upon which this country is founded. Sports teams, band names and brand names which use Indigenous words and icons contribute to turning a marginalized people into a commodity.

This separation of imagery from politics doesn’t just happen here at a local level, but internationally as well. My ancestor’s ceremonial masks are in museums in Germany, England and New York. Mini totem poles are being manufactured in China and then sold in tourist shops in Seattle, Honolulu and Toronto. In the 1800s, they used to put real, live native people on display as well, remnants of a supposedly dying race. But now it is only our hard-won cultural icons and practices, like dreamcatchers and sweatlodges, that are of interest.

So a tomahawk is not just a tomahawk. It is a symbol of my silence. It is a history of resistance turned into a symbol of cool, devoid of any meaning or political significance. As the write-up below the poster notes, images like tomahawks are seen as ‘primitive,’ as are the ceremonies, laws and ways of life native people still practice.

It is no coincidence that when I go to indie music festivals, I see a whole lot of Cowichan sweaters and not a lot of Cowichan people. Yet it is with great surprise whenever I see a native artist or native musicians – actual Indigenous people – included in such mainstream cultural events. It is not the norm.

Likely, many of you won’t care about all this: apathy has had a long-term love affair with consumerism. It’s a classic co-dependent relationship. But a few of you might ask why you should care, what’s in it for you? Well, for starters, I am trying to save you some energy. Maintaining your hipster culture requires a significant amount of effort in order to deny or forget the history I’m talking about. And in fact, it is far from ‘history.’ On the West Coast, we are constantly reminded about the unfinished business of land claims in this province. The current struggle over the Juan de Fuca Trail is a prime example, where elders from local First Nations are speaking out against development.

Consumer culture depends on you divorcing the politics behind native imagery from the history of struggle it has taken for it, and us, to be here. This is an active forgetting, requiring you to spend energy keeping current issues separate and apart from the images you emblazon on your t-shirts, the ‘tribal’ designs you get tattooed on your shoulder or the native names you use for your bands (Geronimo being a good example).

It isn’t necessarily that there is a problem with wearing Indigenous art or symbols – in fact, my family’s success as artists depends on people like yourself buying their jewelry, t-shirts or masks. The challenge is maintaining a connection between the imagery and the practice of our cultural wealth (including artwork, language, ceremonies, and law) and the history and politics that have ensured their survival. So here’s what I suggest.

Why not take another trend and put it to use here – I’m thinking here about the local food craze. ‘Eating local’ involves creating connections on a small scale, lessening the distance between the ground where your food was grown, and your plate. It involves meeting your local farmer at the market, buying a potato they grew themselves and picked that morning, and eating it for dinner that night. Why not take these same principles and put them to work with native imagery and artwork? Rather than buying a Pendleton-style bag mass-produced overseas and sold at Urban Outfitters around the world, why not buy a t-shirt, sweater or earrings from your local Indigenous craftsperson. Meet them, find out where they’re from, and the history behind their particular craft. In the process, you will be educating yourself about local Indigenous history and political struggles, and putting food on the tables of local artisans.

I know this isn’t a complete solution to cultural appropriation, but it’s a start. And with this local approach, you’ll be better informed and can still look cool while doing it.

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:31 PM   #6
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_tmBs3LEW5v...ians_small.jpg

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:32 PM   #7
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

http://www.gq.com/images/women/2010/...oachella03.jpg

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:33 PM   #8
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

I think I could pull this off:

http://matthewjvandeventer.files.wor...head-dress.jpg

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:37 PM   #9
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

Check it out - she's looking to get PORKED in a HONEY BUCKET

http://matthewjvandeventer.files.wor...uld-i-take.jpg

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:39 PM   #10
slunken
Virgo
 
slunken's Avatar
 
Posts: 37,731
Default

i think i s aw my ex gf in one of those pictures

 
slunken is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:40 PM   #11
slunken
Virgo
 
slunken's Avatar
 
Posts: 37,731
Default

http://i121.photobucket.com/albums/o...ot-iceburn.gif

 
slunken is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:41 PM   #12
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m3...xyiko1_500.jpg

whoa side titty DADDY WANT TO EAT THE TITTY

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 02:43 PM   #13
sickbadthing
Out fart the hottie!
 
sickbadthing's Avatar
 
Location: I have super gonorrhoea
Posts: 24,320
Default

ME CHEIF FUCKHEAD! SLEIGH BELLS PUT ON A FUCK-TASTIC SHOW!!!

http://www.legendsofamerica.com/phot...oseph5-500.jpg

 
sickbadthing is offline
Old 05-28-2012, 08:48 PM   #14
duovamp
Brazilian Blouselord
 
duovamp's Avatar
 
Location: heavy metal pool party
Posts: 34,975
Default

There is no greater crime.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sickbadthing View Post
SEEN IT.


Quote:
Originally Posted by sickbadthing View Post
http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m3...xyiko1_500.jpg

whoa side titty DADDY WANT TO EAT THE TITTY
P hawt tbh.

 
duovamp is offline
 


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is On
Google


Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
funny shit from the Sasquatch festival... beef curtains General Chat Archive 8 06-12-2009 12:41 PM
Sasquatch beef curtains Music Board Archive 0 05-24-2009 12:15 PM
Sasquatch Festival Lineup announced MisterSquishyHalo Music Board Archive 15 03-12-2008 05:41 PM
Sasquatch Festival line-up announced MisterSquishyHalo Music Board Archive 5 02-26-2007 03:48 PM
messin with sasquatch Lefluer General Chat Archive 2 06-12-2006 01:49 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:29 AM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Smashing Pumpkins, Alternative Music
& General Discussion Message Board and Forums
www.netphoria.org - Copyright 1998-2014