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Old 06-26-2017, 03:22 PM   #661
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Originally Posted by teh b0lly!!1 View Post
wow these photos mesmerized me

also, very nice photo quality - you dabble in photography/have a really fancy camera?

the cooking one in particular stands out, the out of focus thing is really nice

man i need this so much right now, i wish i could do a trip like that
Thanks man.

I dabble, yes, enough to justify buying the cheapest DSLR I could find. It helps me do cheap tricks like the short depth of field on the bacon and extra long exposures. I barely know how to use it otherwise, just trying to get better at overall composition before I delve into the more technical stuff like color correction.

Mountains are certainly spectacular, but any time spent in nature, away from people, is time well spent in the service of self care.

 
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Old 06-26-2017, 03:41 PM   #662
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Have you considered doing some forestry work? I hope I'm not offending you to bring it up but there's a lot (in a small field) of relevant jobs there and if you like being outside and don't mind water, bugs, etc. it can be good thing to do.

 
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Old 06-26-2017, 04:01 PM   #663
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any time spent in nature... is time well spent
good stuff.

i also wish to join in the naturebrag






 
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Old 06-26-2017, 04:16 PM   #664
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btw are these better, worse than, or equally as soulless as pictures of food?




not sure if the q makes sense entirely but you get it

 
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Old 06-26-2017, 04:23 PM   #665
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It would help to dispel that argument if there was a description of what the pics are in terms geology/biology over great spans of time

 
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Old 06-26-2017, 09:41 PM   #666
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ur guyses pics r nice

I wish I was that good at takin picters

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 01:39 AM   #667
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B'fast
Got any info on that iron skillet?

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 03:21 AM   #668
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this is all I got for yous guys



 
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:08 AM   #669
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:20 AM   #670
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I would post the photos I've been taking, but I'm too lazy to scan them.

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:36 AM   #671
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I would post the photos I've been taking, but I'm too lazy to scan them.
you should. I love looking at people's pictures but usually whenever one of these threads gets bumped it's me posting a bunch of poor photography and not much else

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 06:25 AM   #672
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This thread quality just went way up, how am I supposed to post my blurry phone pics now and not feel bad about it?!!?!?

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 09:54 AM   #673
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I would post the photos I've been taking, but I'm too lazy to scan them.
scanning is certainly a chore. when we get our film developed, we also get discs (disks?), but the dang computi just spits them out now so scanning is our only option.

one day i'm going to upload everything to my flickr page. andrew w.k follows me there and i'm sure he will like a lot.

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:35 PM   #674
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btw are these better, worse than, or equally as soulless as pictures of food?
scenery/landscape photos are my favorite kind of photography personally. Food pictures don't offend me but are uninteresting for the most part. A beautiful landscape shot sets my heart aflutter and shovels coal into the engine of my heart's wanderlust locomotive

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It would help to dispel that argument if there was a description of what the pics are in terms geology/biology over great spans of time
The snail was the biggest snail I have ever seen and it was on the ground outside a place in Chiang Mai where I took a class on Thai massage

The sunrise shot is in Bagan, the first capital of unified Myanmar (then Pagan) between about 1000-1200 CE. It's a big plain filled with over 2,000 stupas and temples (but at the height of the city there were over 10,000). Probably the most awe-inspiring place I have ever been. Most of the stupas and temples are smaller, but a good number are the size of castles

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:55 PM   #675
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Do you Think it's bigger because Thailand has more oxygen

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 04:57 PM   #676
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I was wondering what the little leaf plant is tbh. If I find some Micranthemum I will get botany points

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 05:19 PM   #677
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It would help to dispel that argument if there was a description of what the pics are in terms geology/biology over great spans of time
say no more

Merced River
When the North American Plate on its slow journey westwards encountered the Pacific Plate approximately 250 million years ago during the Paleozoic, the latter began to subduct under the North American continent. Intense pressure underground caused some of the Pacific Plate to melt, and the resulting upwelling magma pushed up and hardened into the granite batholith that makes up much of the Sierra Nevada. Extensive layers of marine sedimentary rock that originally made up the ancient Pacific seabed were also pushed up by the rising granite, and the ancestral Merced River formed on this layer of rock. Over millions of years, the Merced cut a deep canyon through the softer sedimentary rock, eventually hitting the hard granite beneath. The encounter with this resilient rock layer caused the Merced River to mostly stop its downcutting, although tributary streams continued to widen the ancient canyon.

Over about 80 million years, erosion caused the transportation of massive amounts of alluvial sediment to the floor of the Central Valley, where it was trapped between the California Coast Range on the west and the Sierra Nevada on the east, forming an incredibly flat and fertile land surface. The present-day form of the upper Merced River watershed, however, was formed by glaciers, and the lower watershed was indirectly but significantly affected.

When the last glacial period or Ice Age arrived, a series of four tremendous valley glaciers filled the upper basin of the Merced River. These glaciers rose in branches upstream of Yosemite Valley, descending from the Merced River headwaters, Tenaya Canyon and Illilouette Creek. Tenaya Canyon was actually eroded even deeper by an arm of the Tuolumne Glacier, which formed the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and Hetch Hetchy Valley on the Tuolumne River in the north. Little Yosemite Valley formed as a result of the underlying rock being harder than that below the Giant Staircase, the cliff wall containing Vernal Fall and Nevada Fall. These three branches of each glacier combined to form one large glacier about 7,000 feet (2,100 m) thick at maximum, stretching 25 miles (40 km) downstream past the mouth of Yosemite Valley, well into Merced Canyon. These glaciers formed the granite cliffs that now constitute landmarks such as Half Dome, El Capitán, and Cloud's Rest.

The first and largest glacier was the Sherwin or Pre-Tahoe glacier, which eroded the upper Merced watershed to an extent close to its present form. Three stages followed during the Wisconsinian glaciation; these were the Tahoe, Tenaya and Tioga stages, of which the Tioga was the smallest. The Tioga glacier left at the mouth of Yosemite Valley a rocky moraine. This moraine was actually one of several moraines deposited by the four glaciations, which ******* Medial Moraine and Bridalveil Moraine. After the Tioga Glacier retreated this moraine formed a lake that flooded nearly the entire valley. Gradual sedimentation filled Lake Yosemite, creating a broad and flat valley floor. Sediments of glacial origin continued to travel down the Merced River following then, helping to form the flat floor of the Central Valley.
San Joaquin Valley
The San Joaquin Valley is a sediment-filled depression, called a basin, that is bound to the west by the California Coast Ranges, and to the east by the Sierra Nevadas. It is classified as a forearc basin, which basically means that it is a basin that formed in front of a mountain range.

The Valley dates back more than 65 million years ago to the Mesozoic, when subduction was taking place off the coast of California. However, the plate tectonic configuration of western North America changed during the Tertiary, and the ancient trench that once characterized offshore California was transformed into a zone of right-lateral strike-slip motion that we know today as the San Andreas fault. Nonetheless, the Valley still retains many features that characterized it prior to formation of the San Andreas transform.

Because the San Joaquin Valley is bound to the west by the California Coast Ranges, which represent a zone of folding and thrusting (i.e., an accretionary prism) associated with the ancient subduction zone, and bound to the east by the Sierra Nevadas, which represent the eroded roots of an ancient volcanic arc that was also associated with the subduction zone, some call the valley a remnant arc-trench gap.

The tectonic processes by which this arc-trench gap formed are complicated, as are the events by which the ancient trench became the San Andreas fault. These events are covered in more detail in the plate tectonics section of this website, and the four panels below show a snapshot of the key events.

When the San Joaquin Valley first formed it was an inland sea between two mountain ranges. This configuration remained even after formation of the San Andreas fault. However, as the volcanic cover of the Sierras was eroded off, the resulting sediment was dumped into the Valley below. At the same time, The Coast Ranges were also being worn down and dumped into the valley. Thus, the inland sea was filled to create the continental basin we know today.

When the basin was still an inland sea, diatoms and other plankton thrived in it, and when these organisms died they accumulated on the basin floor to create organic-rich shales that ******* the Eocene Kreyenhagen, and Miocene Monterey Formations. The integrated effects of heat and time then acted on the buried organic matter within these shales to create oil, and the detritus eroded from the Coast Ranges and the Sierra Nevadas provided reservoir rocks where the oil could accumulate.
Yosemite area
The exposed geology of the Yosemite area includes primarily granitic rocks with some older metamorphic rock. The first rocks were laid down in Precambrian times, when the area around Yosemite National Park was on the edge of a very young North American continent. The sediment that formed the area first settled in the waters of a shallow sea, and compressive forces from a subduction zone in the mid-Paleozoic fused the seabed rocks and sediments, appending them to the continent. Heat generated from the subduction created island arcs of volcanoes (not unlike Japan) that were also thrust into the area of the park. In time, the igneous and sedimentary rocks of the area were later heavily metamorphosed.

Most of the rock now exposed in the park is granitic, having been formed 210 to 80 million years ago as igneous diapirs 6 miles (10 km) below the surface. Over time, most of the overlying rock was uplifted along with the rest of the Sierra Nevada and was removed from the area by erosion. This exposed the granitic rock to much lower pressure, and it was also subjected to erosion in the forms of exfoliation and mass wasting.

Starting about 3 million years ago a series of glaciations further modified the area by accelerating the erosion. During that time large glaciers periodically filled the valleys and canyons. Landslides and river erosion have been the primary erosive forces since the end of the last glacial period, which ended in this area around 12,000 years BP.

The area of the park was astride a passive continental margin (similar to the east coast of present-day United States) during the Precambrian and early Paleozoic. Sediment was derived from continental sources and was deposited in shallow water. The limestones, sandstones, and shales thus created have since been metamorphosed into marble, quartzite, and slate. These rocks are now exposed on isolated pendants in the northern and central parts of the park (Snow Lake Pendant in the Emigrant Wilderness is a good example).

Starting in the mid-Paleozoic and lasting into the early Mesozoic, a Convergent Plate Boundary transported many of the above-mentioned seabed sediments into the area of the park (possibly during the Antler orogeny). Heat generated from the subduction led to the creation of an island arc of volcanoes on the west coast of ******tia (proto-North America) between the late Devonian and Permian periods. These rocks were incorporated into proto-North America by the middle of the Triassic, some of them finding their way to the area of the park. Most of these igneous and sedimentary rocks have since been heavily metamorphosed, uplifted and eroded away. Outcrops of the resulting Shoo Fly Complex (made of schists and gneisses) and younger Calaveras Complex (a mélange of shale, siltstone, and chert with mafic inclusions) are now found in the western side of the park.

Later volcanism in the Jurassic intruded and covered these rocks in what may have been magmatic activity associated with the early stages of the creation of the Sierra Nevada Batholith. 95% of these rocks were eventually removed by uplifted-accelerated erosion. Most of the remaining rocks are exposed as 'roof pendants' in the eastern metamorphic zone. Mount Dana and Mount Gibbs are made of these metavolcanic rocks. Only 5% of the rocks exposed in Yosemite National Park are metamorphic.

The first phase of regional plutonism started 210 million years ago in the late Triassic and continued throughout the Jurassic to about 150 million years BP. Also starting 150 million years ago was an increase in the westward drift rate of the North American Plate. The resulting orogeny (mountain-building event) is called the Nevadan orogeny by geologists. The resulting Nevadan mountain range (also called the Ancestral Sierra Nevada) was 15,000 feet (4500 m) high and was made of sections of seafloor and mélange.

These rocks were later metamorphosed and today can be seen in the gold-bearing metamorphic belt of California's Mother Lode country. In the area of the park these rocks are exposed along the Merced River and State Route 140. This was directly part of the creation of the Sierra Nevada Batholith, and the resulting rocks were mostly granitic in composition and emplaced about 6 miles (10 km) below the surface.

The second, major pluton emplacement phase lasted from about 120 million to 80 million years ago during the Cretaceous. This was part of the Sevier orogeny. All told there have been more than 50 plutons found in the park. A few miles (several km) of material was eroded away, leaving the Nevadan mountains as a long series of hills a few hundred feet (tens of meters) high by 25 million years ago.

Starting 20 million years ago and lasting until 5 million years ago a now-extinct extension of Cascade Range volcanoes erupted, bringing large amounts of igneous material in the area. These igneous deposits blanketed the region north of the Yosemite area. Some lava associated with this activity poured into the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and formed Little Devils Postpile (a smaller but much older version of the columnar basalt palisades in nearby Devils Postpile National Monument).

In the late Cenozoic, extensive volcanism occurred east of the park area. Within the Yosemite region, andesitic lava flows and lahars flowed north of the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and volcanic dikes and plugs developed from faults on the flanks of Mount Dana. There is also evidence for a great deal of rhyolitic ash covering the northern part of the Yosemite region 30 million years ago. This and later ash deposits have been almost completely eroded away (especially during the ice ages).

Volcanic activity persisted past 5 million years BP east of the current park borders in the Mono Lake and Long Valley areas. The most significant activity was the creation of the Long Valley Caldera about 700,000 years ago in which about 600 times as much material was erupted than in the 1980 eruption of Mt. Saint Helens. The most recent activity was the eruption of the Mono-Inyo Craters from 40,000 to 600 years ago.

10 million years ago, vertical movement along the Sierra fault started to uplift the Sierra Nevada. Subsequent tilting of the Sierra block and the resulting accelerated uplift of the Sierra Nevada increased the gradient of western-flowing streams. The streams consequently ran faster and thus cut their valleys more quickly. Tributary streams ran more-or-less in line with the Sierras, therefore not having their gradients increased. Thus their rate of valley cutting was not significantly affected. The results were hanging valleys and cascading waterfalls where the tributaries met the main streams. Additional uplift occurred when major faults developed to the east, especially the creation of Owens Valley from Basin and Range-associated extensional forces. Uplift of the Sierra accelerated again about two million years ago during the Pleistocene. However, Yosemite valley was not created by streams or fault lines (to create a graben valley), such was suggested by geologist Josiah Whitney. Glaciers shaped the Yosemite Valley, and can easily be confused with a graben valley. (Example of a graben valley is Death Valley in California)

The uplifting and increased erosion exposed granitic rocks in the area to surface pressures, resulting in exfoliation (responsible for the rounded shape of the many granite domes in the park) and mass wasting following the numerous fracture joint planes (cracks; especially vertical ones) in the now solidified plutons. Pleistocene glaciers further accelerated this process and the larger ones transported the resulting talus and till from valley floors.

Numerous vertical joint planes controlled where and how fast erosion took place. Most of these long, linear and very deep cracks trend northeast or northwest and form parallel, often regularly spaced sets. They were created by uplift-associated pressure release and by the unloading of overlying rock via erosion. The great majority of Yosemite Valley's widening, for example, was due to joint-controlled rockfall. In fact, only 10% of its widening and 12% of its excavation are thought to be the result of glaciation. Large, relatively unjointed volumes of granite form domes such as Half Dome and monoliths like the 3604 feet (1098 m) high El Capitan. Closely spaced joints lead to the creation of columns, pillers, and pinnacles such as Washington Column, Cathedral Spires, and Split Pinnacle.

Starting about 2 to 3 million years ago a series of glaciations further modified the area by accelerating mass wasting through ice-wedging, glacial plucking, scouring/abrasion and the release of pressure after the retreat of each glaciation. Severe glaciations formed very large glaciers that tended to strip and transport top soil and talus piles far down glacial valleys, while less-severe glaciations deposited a great deal of glacial till further up in the valleys.

At least 4 major glaciations have occurred in the Sierra Nevada; locally called the Sherwin (also called the pre-Tahoe), Tahoe, Tenaya, and Tioga. The Sherwin glaciers were the largest, filling Yosemite and other valleys, while later stages produced much smaller glaciers. The Sherwin may have lasted almost 300 thousand years and ended about 1 million years ago. A Sherwin-age glacier was almost surely responsible for the major excavation and shaping of Yosemite Valley and other canyons in the area.

The Tahoe, Tenaya, and Tioga stages were part of the Wisconsinan glaciation. The Tahoe glacial stage is thought to have reached its maximum extent around 70,000 to 130,000 years ago; little is known about the more recent Tenaya. Evidence also suggests that the most recent local glacial stage, the Tioga, started about 28,000 cal (calibrated Radiocarbon dating#Measurements and scales) years ago, reached its maximum extent 20,000 to 25,000 cal yr ago, and ended by ~15,000 cal yr ago. Glaciers reformed in the highest cirques during a minor late-glacial readvance, the Recess Peak event, between about 14,200 and 13,100 yr ago.

After that, glaciers appear to have been absent from the range until about 3200 cal yr ago, when small glaciers reappeared in the highest cirques. This readvance records the onset of Neoglaciation in the Sierra Nevada. Neoglaciation in the range culminated during the "Little Ice Age," a term originally coined by François E. Matthes in the Sierra Nevada, but now widely accepted as referring to a period of global glacial expansion between about AD 1250 to 1900. Moraines in the Sierra Nevada related to the Little Ice Age event are termed Matthes deposits. They are common in north-facing cirques and below modern glaciers in the High Sierra and are typically fresh, unstable, and often ice-cored. Good examples of Matthes moraines can be found below the Palisade Glacier (the largest glacier in the range), Lyell and Maclure glaciers in southern Yosemite N.P., and the smaller glaciers below Mount Dana, Kuna Peak, Mount Conness, and Matterhorn Peak.

Glacial systems reached depths of up to 4000 feet (1200 m) and left their marks in the Yosemite area. The longest glacier in the Yosemite area ran down the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River for 60 miles (95 km), passing well beyond Hetch Hetchy Valley. Merced Glacier flowed out of Yosemite Valley and into the Merced River Gorge. Lee Vining Glacier carved Lee Vining Canyon and emptied into Lake Russell (the much enlarged ice age version of Mono Lake). Only the highest peaks, such as Mount Dana and Mount Conness, were not covered by glaciers. Retreating glaciers often left recessional moraines that impounded lakes such as Lake Yosemite (a shallow lake that periodically covered much of the floor of Yosemite Valley).

Some domes in the park were covered by glaciers and modified into roche moutonnées, which are characterized by having a smooth, rounded side and a steep face. The rounded side was where the glacier flowed over the dome and the steep side is where the glacier flowed away from it. The steepness is caused by glacial plucking of rock along fracture joints. Good examples in the park are Liberty Cap, Lembert Dome, and Mount Broderick. Half Dome was created by a different process, but erosion acting on jointing planes was still the major factor.

The origin of the geological landscapes of the park have been under debate since 1865. At that time, Josiah Whitney, then chief geologist of California, proposed that Yosemite Valley is a graben: a downdropped block of land surrounded by faults. John Muir proposed that Yosemite Valley and Hetch Hetchy Valley were formed purely by glacial action. In 1930, François E. Matthes proposed a hybrid hypothesis, where most of the depth of the valley was gouged by water erosion, the rest by glacial action. The glacial action also claimed to have widened the valley.

More recently, the debate has been reopened by Jeffrey Schaffer, who suggests that the role of glaciers and other erosion processes has been dramatically overstated. Schaffer states that Yosemite Valley above 5600 feet (1700 m), for example, has changed relatively little in the past 30 million years. Other than being slightly larger, if one could look back in time and see them, the major features would be recognizable to the modern eye. Schaffer believes that the numerous joint planes have had the greatest impact on the geomorphology of the Park's major features. This is in contradiction to the consensus view that huge highly abrasive glaciers acting on joint planes combined with a great deal of uplift over just the past couple million years was the primary shaping force of the features (such rapid uplift would have greatly accelerated all types of erosion).

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 05:48 PM   #678
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Whoa, very nice. I drew up this diagram to go with your type out:

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:52 PM   #679
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really beautiful photos cork soaker & rbg

i feel like i'm going kinda crazy i think i need to take a few days off and go travel somewhere

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 10:55 PM   #680
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Go to Myanmar, you will not be disappoint.

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:12 PM   #681
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my friend who had just gotten back from a 3 week long trip in tibet/nepal warmly recommended me to go there, but i think i need something really very easy. just a very smooth, zero resistance trip of openly doing nothing and enjoying serene and beautiful nature.

is myanmar hard to get around in? you know, the whole 17-hour bus trips in a bus made out of TV cartons and jammed windows that you can't open or close buses in india thing

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:17 PM   #682
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Do you Think it's bigger because Thailand has more oxygen
yes

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my friend who had just gotten back from a 3 week long trip in tibet/nepal warmly recommended me to go there, but i think i need something really very easy. just a very smooth, zero resistance trip of openly doing nothing and enjoying serene and beautiful nature.

is myanmar hard to get around in? you know, the whole 17-hour bus trips in a bus made out of TV cartons and jammed windows that you can't open or close buses in india thing
Myanmar is by far the most holy shit where the fuck am I place I have ever been. No comparison. It's not what I would call an easy trip, although overall it was easier to navigate than India, it's also more disconnected from the outside world than anywhere else I have been. And it's more expensive than most other places in SE Asia.

I was on a train for 18 hours that shook so hard I couldn't even lie down without being tossed against the wall. I eventually got so drunk I fell asleep. Anthony Bourdain even did a special about the insane railways here.

I probably would not recommend this as a no resistance trip, but it is something I would highly highly recommend you do eventually since you are already in Asia.

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:19 PM   #683
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You should fly into Luang Prabang, Laos and spend a few days chilling out, wandering the streets of the little city, drinking beer and going on pre-organized day trips to cool waterfalls and caves and stuff.

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:35 PM   #684
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That sounds awesome. How long were you in Mynmar?

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:37 PM   #685
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I'm thinking of thos snails

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:38 PM   #686
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Whoa, very nice. I drew up this diagram to go with your type out:
Whatevs. I've been there twice, sober and on drugs.

Think about that!

 
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Old 06-27-2017, 11:47 PM   #687
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That sounds awesome. How long were you in Mynmar?
only 10 days. we had a month to backpack through vietnam laos thailand and myanmar. we managed to see a LOT though

 
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Old 06-28-2017, 01:23 AM   #688
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Originally Posted by Disco King View Post
I would post the photos I've been taking, but I'm too lazy to scan them.
Have you had a go at making redscale, yet?


 
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Old 06-28-2017, 03:32 AM   #689
redbreegull
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I guess I'm going to do the thing I always do and just post a bunch of pics since everyone else is so coy about it. more myanmar incoming




built in the mid 19th century, U Bein Bridge near Mandalay is the longest and oldest teakwood bridge in the world

 
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Old 06-28-2017, 03:49 AM   #690
Shallowed
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I'm no photographer but there's something about the composition of that photo

 
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