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Old 07-04-2018, 02:20 PM   #1
Oklahoma Sexual
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Default Bright and Oh So Shiny Tour - Loudwire Interview

http://loudwire.com/smashing-pumpkin...fbshare_mobile

Lol, article doesn't even get tour name right
Quote:
Smashing Pumpkins are back on a career upswing, reuniting three-quarters of their classic lineup, while also continuing on with guitarist Jeff Schroeder who has been a key figure in the latter day era of the group. The band just released the new single ďSolaraĒ and will start their ďBright and Oh So ShinyĒ tour July 12 in Glendale, Ariz.

Loudwire Nights host Toni Gonzalez recently spoke with Billy Corgan and Jeff Schroeder about ďSolaraĒ and their excitement over new music, as well as the current lineupís dynamics.

Do you remember the first thing the reunited Smashing Pumpkins worked on creatively in the studio as a unit?

Billy Corgan:
We went to a studio for three weeks to do demos, so I donít even really remember. There was so much music, and we worked so fast. We worked on 16 pieces of music over three weeks, so itís kind of a blur. You have any memory, Jeff?

Jeff Schroeder: Yeah, actually, I do. We did do the demos first, but when we actually moved up to Shangri-La to work with Rick [Rubin], actually, on the tunes and start tracking, I personally had a pretty touchy moment for myself in that I was sitting there tuning my guitar, and then I looked around and saw Billy, Jimmy, and James. And then I look through the window and see Rick Rubin, and I thought like, ďWow. This is a really special moment.Ē To think that when I joined the band it was such a different scenario, that to even think twelve years later youíd be at this point, it was really unfathomable. So I really kind of took a second and took it in.

Letís talk about the new song, ďSolara,Ē which we are playing on Loudwire Nights. Why did you feel it was the right song to reintroduce the Smashing Pumpkins to the world, and do you consider it a reintroduction, given the band never really went away?

Billy Corgan:
You wanna tackle that one, Jeff?

Jeff Schroeder: [Laughing] Sure, yeah. No, I think that we didnít over-intellectualize it and try to write a song that would reintroduce the band. I think that we just played, and I think certain characteristics that are strong points of the band came into play, and so I think that what you hear is very classic Pumpkins, because thatís kind of everybody doing their job and doing it well and it just works.


Billy, can you speak of it, too, how this song came together and the meaning behind it?

Billy Corgan:
I usually donít talk about song meanings anymore, because somehow in the Internet age that turns into, like, a religion. So I hate to be vague, but Iíve learned my lesson on that. As far as the songís roots, it actually has roots in the last Smashing Pumpkins album. It was demoed during the Monuments album; Jeff and I were the only people in the band at that time and we just couldnít find the magic. We always thought the song was strong, but we couldnít find the magic in it. So when we came in in this situation, the minute we put it in Jimmy Chamberlinís hands, itís like, ďOh, thereís the magic.Ē So it got a lot easier after that.

What makes you most excited about the new songs?

Billy Corgan:
For me, I think itís the fact that, like Jeff said, we donít have to intellectualize anything. You have the principal people in the room who made the albums that people are familiar with. And like Jeff said, when everybody does what they do and they do it well, it comes out sounding like Smashing Pumpkins without having to try, where having been in other situations, and obviously Jeff was involved in many of those situations, at times we would sit around and say, ďWe know what people want.Ē Itís not really, ďShould we try to shave an edge here and there?Ē And honestly, as a musician, thatís probably the worst thing you can do. Frank Zappa had an album called Shut Up ní Play Yer Guitar, and I think thereís something to that. Thereís a point where youíre better off as a musician just playing whatever you feel.

I donít blame anybody for this, but I think when I was in the band called Smashing Pumpkins, and Jeff and I are the only guys in the band, by calling it Smashing Pumpkins, people are gonna have an expectation, whether you want them to or not, and if you try to combat that expectation, youíre gonna be frustrated. If you try to go along with it, youíre really probably not being in the moment, as far as making the music thatís in your heart. So you get kind of caught in cross-purposes. So it just feels really good now to not have to think about any of that anymore, and we just make our music, and if people like it, great.

Has the band settled on a release date that you can share?

Billy Corgan:
I think management would prefer if we not talk about that, but thereís definitely more music coming. We recorded eight songs, and we hope to put them all out this year.

OK, I had to ask. Billy, people tend to classify you as, as you called it, ďA Class A heel,Ē as you said in your New York Times interview. Do you give much thought to othersí perspectives of you?

Billy Corgan:
No, honestly, because we live in a world where most of the people who care about that stuff really arenít fans of the band. Itís more of a gossip type of thing, and you can play into that, but ultimately it doesnít really do what you hoped it would do, which is get people to listen to the music. I donít think the guy printed it in the New York Times interview, but I said, ďIím done playing that guy.Ē I did it because I enjoyed it. I thought it was fun. I thought I made a lot of good points through the years that exposed the hypocrisy of much of the media complex as far as how they treat celebrity, that theyíre really not interested in the work, theyíre more interested in what the work gives them in terms of opportunity of creating clickbait and stuff like that.

So Iím pretty settled at 51 years old. My life is about music and being an artist. Iím blessed to play with such tremendous musicians who are great collaborators, friends, family. Iím blessed to still want to write music, and especially with my partners. Itís a great time in my life. Like Jeff, whoís obviously in this with us, he and I, weíre 12 years into this journey together, thatís a tremendous journey, and just Jeff and I alone, weíve had the highest of the highs and the lowest of the lows. So itís a great time to be in the band.

Jeff, you seem to be very ambitious, very productive. I believe you earned your PhD in comparative literature; youíve produced an EP and a full-length album while working with the Pumpkins; studying jazz guitar with Tony Do Rosario. But Billy has spoken about how much you do behind the scenes for Smashing Pumpkins besides your musical contribution. Can you speak a bit about that?

Jeff Schroeder:
I never really thought about it in that way of, ďOh, I should do some extra.Ē I just think that what I learned from joining the band 12 years ago is that thereís kind of a high demand for putting out quality work or a quality show. So itís just kind of looking around and looking at what needs to be done, I guess different than other bands, which Billy and I to this day shouldnít be shocked at that. People in the industry that work for you tend to be shocked that you actually care about how your guitar sounds or what you look like or what the video looks like, what the lights look like, what the sound is like. And so I think itís just across the ó I think you would find that all of us care that much. Itís not just me, itís that we all care.

I donít mean to sound sappy, but what is the most valuable thing youíve taught each other, musically or otherwise, as you said, during your 12 years?

Jeff Schroeder:
I just think, and Iíll just use one example, that what I learned and what has been the most valuable thing to me as an artist and as a musician is that I think people would say that maybe Billy has a reputation for being a certain way in the studio, whatever, and be hard on people or this or that, but Iíll tell you one thing, heís just as hard, if not harder, on himself. So once you realize that, and you get into that mindset of itís really the art, the song that youíre working for and really trying to uncover little pieces that you can find that are gonna make the song better, I think that that kind of relentless pursuit of greatness in that way is the most valuable lesson that Iíve learned as a musician.

Billy Corgan: From my end, Iím almost 30 years in as a quote/unquote ďprofessional musician.Ē My father was a professional musician, and I watched him go through great struggles, never achieved the success that he hoped for. If you approach music from the point of ambition first and relationships second, youíre also gonna be severely disappointed. I think the one thing I really, really learned over time is that if you donít trust the people youíre in the bunker with, if you donít love them, if you donít care for them, and you also donít let them love you back, youíre also gonna be disappointed.

The music, when you can combine your friendships and your family and your heart with the music youíre making, the music sounds so much better. The songs you write have so much more passion in them. Itís hard to explain, but it starts from the family of the band first to the music, and when James, DíArcy, Jimmy, and I had that at a point, these golden years where we produced so much great music that people still want to talk to me about every time Iím in an airport or something, it really goes back to we were on the same page, not just about the next video, but like where we were as people. We shared every meal together. We went to each otherís weddings, and it really, really did have a lot to do with the music that we made. When we lost that with one another, we lost our ability to make that kind of music.

Do you feel that the rebuilding of public trust, as you stated, in the band has begun, and what measures are being taken to do so?

Billy Corgan:
Well, itís kind of weird because Ö I think itís a great question. Itís not me disabusing the question, but itís weird, because you end up battling perceptions which you know internally really arenít real, so it gets into your reputation or why some people left or stayed, so you end up answering a lot of questions which really arenít relevant to how the band works internally. I would say the simplest thing, if the question is trust, which I think is really ephemeral, honestly, and not as valuable as people might think it is, itís just: do your work and be consistent. A lot of the years that people didnít like what we were doing, they didnít even really understand why we were doing what we were doing.

Iíll give you the perfect example. We did a 20th anniversary tour in 2008. Jeff was in the band, Jimmy was in the band, James was obviously not in the band, and we were taking a very aggressive position against where rock and roll was, what people thought the band was and wasnít, so it was very much a contrarian position on what rock and roll is, whatís valuable in rock and roll. We made a lot of creative and aesthetic points that I consider very valuable in that the band as it exists today is completely tied to that band at that moment.

But people look at it as like, ďOh, you were so angry.Ē No. I was in complete control of my emotions, and I knew exactly what I was doing. I was playing the character of a very angry person. It doesnít mean I didnít have my own feelings about it, but as an artist, if youíre not in control of yourself, then itís like being an actor onstage and forgetting your lines and fumbling all over. Itís like 99 percent of the time Iím in control of myself and I know what Iím doing, because Iím making points that arenít necessarily about fame or success. Thatís what the band was built on.

The band was built on a contrary position. We had to fight for every video, every weird thing we ever did, because people would say, ďWhy donít you just make the normal video, and youíll sell more records and people will like you.Ē And weíd say, ďBut we donít care. Itís not why weíre here.Ē So people forget that the bandís roots really are anachronistic and anarchic, not wave the pop flag and get along. Thatís why the bandís still here.

I want to talk about the upcoming tour. What can you tell us about what the fans can expect and see, and are either of you very hands-on in terms of stage production, or is that left to someone else?

Billy Corgan:
No. Weíre very involved in the stage production. Itís the most ambitious show weíve ever mounted. Itís a crazy amount of production, lights, and video. Weíve been shooting stuff on sound stages out here in L.A. for the show. The show tells a story which is very interesting, I think, and weíll see how people take to it. But no, the show itself is a real celebration of the bandís 30 years, and itís gonna be quite interesting and exciting, because weíve never been able to mount Ö and now the technology thatís available these days, compared to, say, the technology that was available 20 years ago about how you put on a show, itís unbelievable the technology. So itíll be full lasers, as we like to say.

I know youíre a huge metalhead, Billy, and the community recently suffered a huge loss with the passing of Pantera drummer Vinnie Paul. Did that band have any influence on you? Did you know Paul?

Billy Corgan:
Yeah, I knew Pantera quite well. I used to go see the band all the time, hung with them, drank with them. Dimebag gave me a guitar, gave James a guitar too. They had an influence on our record, Mellon Collie and the Infinite Sadness. [They were] one of the greatest bands ever. The fact that both Abbott brothers are gone ó Vinnie was an incredible, sweet guy. He loved music. And obviously, the tragedy of his brotherís death and what he went through that day, that night, itís something that I think all musicians [understand]. if you knew Vinnie, you loved Vinnie, you also couldnít help but understand what he was going through, because weíve all been in that position where youíre looking out in the crowd, and you donít know whatís out there.

So the tragedy of the Abbott brothers and what Vinnie went through, I donít know. I canít even find the words, because itís so sad. And obviously, we still have the music, but there was something special with those Abbott brothers that is very, very, very, very rare in rock íní roll. They brought a lot of love and passion to fans. Itís just so sad.

Thanks to Smashing Pumpkins for the interview. The bandís ďBright and Oh So ShinyĒ tour kicks off July 12 in Glendale, Ariz. and you can see all of the dates here. Take a listen to their new single ďSolaraĒ in the player below. ĎLoudwire Nightsí airs on radio stations across the country and to find out where you can hear host Toni Gonzalez on the program, check here.

Last edited by Oklahoma Sexual : 07-04-2018 at 02:49 PM.

 
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Old 07-04-2018, 02:23 PM   #2
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Quote:
You have any memory, Jeff?

Jeff Schroeder: Yeah, actually, I do.




 
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Old 07-04-2018, 03:12 PM   #3
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Corgan always trying to wave the punk flag and the business flag simultaneously

one moment it's the band is "anarchic, not wave the pop flag and get on" and the next it's crying about hipsters and some corporate jargon about the scarcity principle

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 02:30 AM   #4
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Quote:
Billy, can you speak of it, too, how this song came together and the meaning behind it?

Billy Corgan: I usually don’t talk about song meanings anymore, because somehow in the Internet age that turns into, like, a religion. So I hate to be vague, but I’ve learned my lesson on that. As far as the song’s roots, it actually has roots in the last Smashing Pumpkins album. It was demoed during the Monuments album; Jeff and I were the only people in the band at that time and we just couldn’t find the magic. We always thought the song was strong, but we couldn’t find the magic in it. So when we came in in this situation, the minute we put it in Jimmy Chamberlin’s hands, it’s like, “Oh, there’s the magic.” So it got a lot easier after that.

What makes you most excited about the new songs?

Billy Corgan: For me, I think it’s the fact that, like Jeff said, we don’t have to intellectualize anything.
How convenient that he's above explaining the lyrics to Solara considering that he probably wrote them in a couple of minutes just to have something to sing and they never meant anything in the first place. It's a struggle to find any BC songs post Zwan that read like he actually put the work in as a lyricist. It takes a special type of person to assume that his lazy stream-of-consciousness drivel should be heard by everyone.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 02:43 AM   #5
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"We recorded 8 songs and hope to put them out this year..."

Pretty much means you're just getting Solara.

And no way in bloody hell did he drink with Pantera.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 02:45 AM   #6
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it actually has roots in the last Smashing Pumpkins album
no shit

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 03:36 AM   #7
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Billy's insecurities:

"I’m almost 30 years in as a quote/unquote “professional musician.” "

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 04:52 AM   #8
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this article puzzled me

seriously - why is anybody there under the impression people are interested in jeff's words?

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:11 AM   #9
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It's nice to hear from Jeff and lovely to see Billy encouraging and allowing someone else to speak...but ..

Quote:
People in the industry that work for you tend to be shocked that you actually care about how your guitar sounds
Maybe they're just chocked that you want to sound like..that

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 05:20 AM   #10
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Jeff Schroeder (PhD in comparative literature):
I never really thought about it in that way of, “Oh, I should do some extra.” I just think that what I learned from joining the band 12 years ago is that there’s kind of a high demand for putting out quality work or a quality show. So it’s just kind of looking around and looking at what needs to be done, I guess different than other bands, which Billy and I to this day shouldn’t be shocked at that. People in the industry that work for you tend to be shocked that you actually care about how your guitar sounds or what you look like or what the video looks like, what the lights look like, what the sound is like. And so I think it’s just across the — I think you would find that all of us care that much. It’s not just me, it’s that we all care.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 06:44 AM   #11
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Especially Jeff always takes care for a continuing good look of himself.

Like..with his guitar playing









Well, with few exceptions...


 
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:09 AM   #12
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:20 AM   #13
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His guitar playing is fine, great. I think he'd be top notch if he had someone with a strong artistic vision to work with who could push him in the right direction and buy him like a.. peavey 5150 and a copy of Van Halen 1.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:25 AM   #14
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Gd Corgan is such a pos. You forget a little until you actually read something he said.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 07:42 AM   #15
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Like their 1997 tour the Infintie Melon Tour

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:34 AM   #16
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How many F’ing times can they say Jeff “12 years” Schriardor in 1 F’ing interview

It’s almost as if they think they need to explain/apologize for why we’re getting a jeff who’s jeff? instead of an actual reunion

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:45 AM   #17
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lol james has to play with an iha clone

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:45 AM   #18
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What makes you most excited about the new songs?

Billy Corgan: For me, I think it’s the fact that, like Jeff said, we don’t have to intellectualize anything. You have the principal people in the room who made the albums that people are familiar with. And like Jeff said, when everybody does what they do and they do it well, it comes out sounding like Smashing Pumpkins without having to try, where having been in other situations, and obviously Jeff was involved in many of those situations, at times we would sit around and say, “We know what people want.” It’s not really, “Should we try to shave an edge here and there?” And honestly, as a musician, that’s probably the worst thing you can do. Frank Zappa had an album called Shut Up n’ Play Yer Guitar, and I think there’s something to that. There’s a point where you’re better off as a musician just playing whatever you feel.

I don’t blame anybody for this, but I think when I was in the band called Smashing Pumpkins, and Jeff and I are the only guys in the band, by calling it Smashing Pumpkins, people are gonna have an expectation, whether you want them to or not, and if you try to combat that expectation, you’re gonna be frustrated. If you try to go along with it, you’re really probably not being in the moment, as far as making the music that’s in your heart. So you get kind of caught in cross-purposes. So it just feels really good now to not have to think about any of that anymore, and we just make our music, and if people like it, great.


This is the most important part of the interview. He literally doesn't care what anyone here thinks.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:46 AM   #19
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oh i thought he figuratively doesn't care what anyone here thinks.

thanks for clearing that up.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 08:53 AM   #20
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If SOLARA is him shuttin up, playin his guitar and doing whatever he feels then I think he'd be better off using surveys, spreadsheets and focus groups to write songs

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 09:07 AM   #21
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Corgan at least cares about record sales.

That's why he changed his artist name back to "Billy Corgan"...


D'arcy:

"Billy is a very insecure person.

Billy told James and me on may occasions over the years that he is jealous of us and why he was jealous.

he is not threatened by James anymore for a lot of reasons,
but he called me a year ago depressed and saying that no one cares about the original members of the band and that the fans only want me back.

That is not true.

I tried to tell him that it wasn't true.

I tried for over an hour to talk some sense into him.

I failed.

That's why i'm not in the band."

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 09:21 AM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Corgan's Bluff View Post
Jeff Schroeder (PhD in comparative literature):
I never really thought about it in that way of, ďOh, I should do some extra.Ē I just think that what I learned from joining the band 12 years ago is that thereís kind of a high demand for putting out quality work or a quality show. So itís just kind of looking around and looking at what needs to be done, I guess different than other bands, which Billy and I to this day shouldnít be shocked at that. People in the industry that work for you tend to be shocked that you actually care about how your guitar sounds or what you look like or what the video looks like, what the lights look like, what the sound is like. And so I think itís just across the ó I think you would find that all of us care that much. Itís not just me, itís that we all care.
just because he talks like that doesn't mean he writes like shit. we all speak differently than we write

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 09:42 AM   #23
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So obviously we Will NOT get any ep soon. Shame on billys announements.

The 8 songs will be in the shape of solara. Almost all written in the monuments era- so you can expect some billy vocals up front with metallic guitars and some metal drumming.

I have almost no hope that the eps will be good.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:02 AM   #24
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"So people forget that the band’s roots really are anachronistic and anarchic, not wave the pop flag and get along. That’s why the band’s still here."

Why does he keep saying this dumb shit over and over? Cue up 'Today' for christ's sake. Cue up 'Disarm,' or 'Bullet with Butterfly Wings.'

Didn't he also say early on that they wanted to 'sell out' as soon as possible?

All this "no one understands what we're doing because the band has always been contrarian to everything" is such bullshit.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:40 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by slayed23 View Post
What makes you most excited about the new songs?

Billy Corgan: For me, I think itís the fact that, like Jeff said, we donít have to intellectualize anything. You have the principal people in the room who made the albums that people are familiar with. And like Jeff said, when everybody does what they do and they do it well, it comes out sounding like Smashing Pumpkins without having to try, where having been in other situations, and obviously Jeff was involved in many of those situations, at times we would sit around and say, ďWe know what people want.Ē Itís not really, ďShould we try to shave an edge here and there?Ē And honestly, as a musician, thatís probably the worst thing you can do. Frank Zappa had an album called Shut Up ní Play Yer Guitar, and I think thereís something to that. Thereís a point where youíre better off as a musician just playing whatever you feel.

I donít blame anybody for this, but I think when I was in the band called Smashing Pumpkins, and Jeff and I are the only guys in the band, by calling it Smashing Pumpkins, people are gonna have an expectation, whether you want them to or not, and if you try to combat that expectation, youíre gonna be frustrated. If you try to go along with it, youíre really probably not being in the moment, as far as making the music thatís in your heart. So you get kind of caught in cross-purposes. So it just feels really good now to not have to think about any of that anymore, and we just make our music, and if people like it, great.


This is the most important part of the interview. He literally doesn't care what anyone here thinks.
was there ever a point where he cared what other people thought? yes, his entire LIFE. has he ever admitted that? as an artist, no, because he's insecure about it. what he does is claim and espouse how much he doesn't care over and over until you finally realize how much he's been lying to himself and his fans and friends for 30 years. BC would be an empty vessel if it weren't for all the bullshit inside.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:44 AM   #26
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Corgan:
"ďWe know what people want.Ē Itís not really, ďShould we try to shave an edge here and there?Ē And honestly, as a musician, thatís probably the worst thing you can do. Frank Zappa had an album called Shut Up ní Play Yer Guitar, and I think thereís something to that. Thereís a point where youíre better off as a musician just playing whatever you feel."

LOL
Did Corgan ever hear Zappa's "Shut Up ní Play Yer Guitar" recordings?
It's an album with instrumental outtakes/live improvisations of several years he put together. The title is just ironicly describing it.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 10:51 AM   #27
eviltimeban
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He always wanted to be a girl.

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 11:24 AM   #28
SPLATTER
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I like the part where he admits Solara was just a piece of junk from Monuments that they got Jimmy to overplay on so it would be interesting

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 11:58 AM   #29
incubator
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Originally Posted by SPLATTER View Post
I like the part where he admits Solara was just a piece of junk from Monuments that they got Jimmy to overplay on so it would be interesting
I just wanna know WHY. Monuments / D4N was years ago. Anyone else would've wrote tonnes more songs by now and forgotten all about Solara. He's got some weird fixation with it. His brain is broke. All those Monuments recording updates where he's like "We tried Solara again today, this time in a blah blah style for I believe its blah blah. Howard shakes his head though 'it's still a crap song Billy sorry'. Tomorrow we shall try again with more rocking".

 
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Old 07-05-2018, 12:42 PM   #30
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It was demoed during the Monuments album; Jeff and I were the only people in the band at that time and we just couldn’t find the magic. We always thought the song was strong, but we couldn’t find the magic in it.
Yeah well neither can we, Billy.

 
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