Netphoria Message Board


Go Back   Netphoria Message Board > General Boards > Music News and Discussion
Register Netphoria's Amazon.com Link Members List Photo Album Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-08-2016, 04:08 PM   #121
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

an early review

http://www.independent.ie/entertainm...-34696357.html

Radiohead have spent their careers not caring what anyone thinks so it would be an overstatement to describe the Oxfordshire five-piece as a band in crisis following the tepid reception afforded 2011's The King of Limbs album.

Nonetheless, it is tempting to conclude that they have taken stock after that record's bleary mash-up of dubstep, rock and ambient piano left even hardcore fans nonplussed. Released just after 7pm Sunday A Moon Shaped Pool, their much- awaited ninth long player, feels like a conscious exercise in course correction, with concessions to old-fashioned songwriting detectible amid the traditional Radiohead haze of free-floating electronica and fragmented angst.

The tone is set by Burn The Witch, the surprise single with which the group trailered the project. The track unspools in a fever dream of sad yodelling by singer Thom Yorke and yammering strings from guitarist Jonny Greenwood. Musically and tonally, it is A Moon Shaped Pool in microcosm. Throughout, the overwhelming mood is a pent-up weariness, with Yorke surveying the world and despairing (those who have read Burn The Witch as commentary on the demonising of migrants will no doubt see further political subtext in the frontman's endless pivoting from pathos to paranoia).

Occasionally, it is true, the tempo moves up or down a gear. Ful Stop erupts into an electro-percussive frenzy; Identikit's urgent groove serve as backdrop to one of those swoonful choruses Radiohead have been able to dash out in their sleep since The Bends (hopefully our ears deceive us and Yorke isn't actually singing "move your arse/make it rain").

There are longueurs, too, and A Moon Shaped Pool carries on the tradition of Radiohead albums that, two thirds the way in, appear to lose interest in being a Radiohead album. Here the culprits are The Numbers, a listless, piano-fuelled whinge that spends five and a half minutes circling the drain, and Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor Rich Man Poor Man Begger Man Thief, which is as vexing and pretentious as the mouthful title would suggest.

Still, all is redeemed as the death as the group, again working with producer Nigel Godrich, debut an overhauled version of long-standing live favourite True Love Waits. The song tilts and shudders, threatening constantly to collapse under the weight of its own ennui. It's delicate and gossamer gauzy, a wispy fade out to a deft, measured record sure to find favour with Radiohead fanboys and passings admirers alike.

Rating: 4/5

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 04:41 PM   #122
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

The Guardian's (rather lengthy) review

http://www.theguardian.com/global/20...ed-pool-review



Last Tuesday, the world was treated to the improbable spectacle of tastemaking US music website Pitchfork earnestly trying to explain Trumpton to its American readers. Their London-based contributing editor was drafted in, the better to elucidate the importance of Pugh, Pugh and Barney McGrew, as was the son-in-law of the show’s 96-year-old creator, although the latter’s solitary quote – “I’m not aware of anything” – winningly suggested a man quite keen to get the bloke from Pitchfork off the phone. Elsewhere, parallels were drawn between Trumpton and what might become of America were Donald Trump to become president, which feels like rather a harsh judgement on the seemingly benign regime of the Mayor and Mr Troop the town clerk.

This all happened because Radiohead had premiered a video based on Trumpton’s stop-frame animation for a compelling mesh of chattering high-maintenance strings and ominous bass and drum thunder called Burn The Witch, the first track to be released from their ninth studio album A Moon Shaped Pool.

You could possibly accuse the Pitchfork piece of over-thinking things a bit – it may well be that the band and director Chris Hopewell chose to depict Trumpton-ites immolating a bowler-hatted outsider in a wicker man as “a pointed critique of nativism-embracing leaders across the UK and Europe”, but there’s also the chance they just thought it was funny – but the fact that it exists at all tells you something about the unique position Radiohead continue to hold.

Artistically at least, these are supposed to be thin times for rock music, particularly rock of the stadium-filling variety. The really important, epochal, provocative stuff – the music that, to use a ghastly phrase, carries the conversation – is clearly happening in hip hop and R&B. With one exception: alone among their commercial peers, Radiohead are held to not just release albums, but make grand artistic statements, worth dissecting and poring over in the same way as the output of Kendrick Lamar or Beyonce: certainly, no one’s falling over themselves to decode the politics of Coldplay’s releases.
Advertisement

Listening to A Moon Shaped Pool, you can see why. However much their style bears certain hallmarks – Thom Yorke’s keening vocal shiver and what you might charitably describe as a fairly glum bearing among them - Radiohead have always sounded like a band in constant motion: every album has seemed like an agitated shift from the last, as if they were too neurotic to rest on their laurels even if they wanted to.

Certainly, A Moon Shaped Pool is noticeably different to its predecessor, 2011’s patchy King Of Limbs. You’d hesitate to call it more poppy – this is still an album on which standard verse-chorus structures are very much subject to subsidence, and on which the instruments buried deep in the mix frequently seem to be playing an entirely different song to those in the foreground – but it’s certainly sharper and more focused.

There’s nothing as slippery and unclear as King Of Limbs’ Bloom or Feral. They seem as fascinated by sonic textures as they do by actual songwriting – the weirdly uplifting moment towards the end of Ful Stop (sic), when the song’s muffled sound suddenly becomes bright and trebly, as if a DJ has turned the eq knob on his mixer to the right – but it’s not an album that feels lost in experimentation. The abundance of sonic intrigue is matched by the quantity of beautiful tunes: the fact that True Love Waits, a track that dates back to the less knotty era of their 1995 album The Bends, fits perfectly in the line-up of songs tells you something about their unabashed melodic richness.

There’s something pretty dazzling about the way Tinker Tailor Soldier Sailor combines two of what you might call Radiohead’s extracurricular interests, Jonny Greenwood’s soundtrack work and the electronica Thom Yorke plays when DJing – soft explosions of white noise and a distorted keyboard line are slowly overwhelmed by a luscious string arrangement – but there’s something equally dazzling about the plaintively lovely tune that floats over folky acoustic guitar picking and a vaguely Latin shuffle beat on Present Tense.
Advertisement

The simple prettiness of the piano figure that runs through Daydreaming battles it out with unsettling scrapes of backwards vocal that sometimes sound like oblique harmonies, but more often like someone struggling for breath. Identikit meanwhile, wrongfoots the listener entirely: it initially sounds like a studio jam session that made it on to the album through some kind of clerical error – snatches of vocal and scrabbling guitar, drums treated with dub reggae effects – before suddenly pulling into focus: a hook that immediately brands itself on to your brain, an agitated, thrilling guitar solo.

It is tempting to say that all this fidgety invention comes as a welcome distraction from the suffocating gloom of the lyrics, cursed as the latter are with a worldview that frequently sees any kind of personal happiness as merely the result of ignorance, wilful or otherwise: “dreamers they never learn”, “we are helpless to resist”, “I’ll drown my beliefs to your babies”, “we are happy just to serve”, “there’s nothing left inside that we all can love… I don’t want to know”.

That said, you do find yourself wondering if Radiohead’s collective tongue might not occasionally be wedged in their collective cheek, if, as with the video for Burn The Witch, they might not sometimes be parodying their austere image as rock’s premiere harbingers of doom.

“Don’t get heavy, keep it light,” offers Present Tense. The introduction to Glass Eyes is a thing of beauty and unalloyed pleasure, played on a piano treated with digital effects until it sounds like it’s been submerged beneath rippling water, at least until Yorke slopes into view, his face like the proverbial slapped arse. “Hey, it’s me,” he mournfully intones and immediately you think: uh-oh, here we go. And so it proves: “a frightening place, faces are concrete grey… panic is coming on strong”.

If the thought of Radiohead occasionally playing it for LOLs is too mind-blowing to bear, you’ll have to content yourself with the occasional chinks of light amid the murk.

There’s Desert Island Disk with its suggestion that “different types of love are possible” and The Numbers, which is also that rarest of things, a Radiohead track that doesn’t just vaguely resemble another artist’s work (anyone still intent on depicting Radiohead as a latterday Pink Floyd might feel their ears prick up at Decks Dark’s burst of Atom Heart Mother-ish choral vocals) but actually seems to be a direct and obvious homage to something else, or possibly two things: the resemblance of the tumbling piano parts to those on John Martyn’s 1971 instrumental Glistening Glynebourne might be purely coincidental, but the similarity of the intense orchestration, circling bassline and loose-limbed funk rhythm to Melody, the opening track of Serge Gainsbourg’s 1970 Historie De Melody Nelson, definitely is not. They’re certainly not the first people to mine that song’s arrangement for inspiration, but it says something about Radiohead’s inventiveness that they can warp music already plundered by everyone from Beck to Belle And Sebastian into something that sounds entirely their own.

Moreover, the high-drama swells of strings fit the lyrical message. Radiohead’s previous attempts at creating a rousing call to arms have been hobbled by their innate pessimism, as exemplified by 2001’s You And Whose Army?, on which Thom Yorke somehow contrived to sound utterly deflated while offering Tony Blair out for a punch-up in time-honoured “come on then” style. Here, however, the stuff about how the future is inside us and people have the power sounds authentically stirring. It also sounds like Radiohead achieving something they’ve never achieved before, a quarter of a century into their career: long may their neuroses keep them in constant motion.



Last edited by Elijah Moon : 05-09-2016 at 09:27 AM.

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 04:42 PM   #123
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

Has anyone here heard it in its entirety yet? Thoughts?

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 09:15 PM   #124
ciGarski
is thinking of you
 
ciGarski's Avatar
 
Location: I can't control my shakes, how the hell did I get here?
Posts: 14,448
Default

so do they like it?

 
ciGarski is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 09:27 PM   #125
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

downloading now

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 09:50 PM   #126
Disco King
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Disco King's Avatar
 
Location: "The worst poster on this board by far." -- The worst poster on this board by far
Posts: 4,244
Default

Kind of wonder why the physical copies don't come with instant downloads. The CD doesn't even come with a download at all.

Like, I like having physical copies, but I have to wait over a month to get it, and would only be able to listen to it in the meantime if I bought the digital copy in addition. And why would I buy the same album twice?

I dunno, didn't their last one add in an instant digital copy if you purchased the physical media? Isn't that how most bands that release stuff like this do it nowadays?

Eh I shouldn't really complain, they released their music and they aren't forcing me to buy or not to buy anything, so what more do I want? But actually yeah, more I do want. MORE.

 
Disco King is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-08-2016, 11:31 PM   #127
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

i'm only thinking out loud here, and as i said, my impression may very well change over time -

but upon listening to the first half of the record, it all sounds very underwhelming and uninspired to me. it doesn't sound like it has that special interweaving collaboration that these guys are known for. it just continues to sound like thom yorke mumbling new songs on his piano and pimping phil selway into programming drum loops behind it.
songs ruminate and don't really go anywhere, don't feel very thought out, it don't sound like there's any excitement behind them. this is what bored musicians sound like.

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 12:35 AM   #128
butthurt
Apocalyptic Poster
 
butthurt's Avatar
 
Location: on the internet
Posts: 1,051
Default

Haven't listened yet, but I give it 3/10.

 
butthurt is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 01:10 AM   #129
Sonic Johnny
Through Silver In Buds
 
Sonic Johnny's Avatar
 
Location: Centralia
Posts: 16,063
Default

If it was just the studio version of True Love Waits it would still be an A+ album.

Also: people who don't like King Of Limbs are uncultured swine.

 
Sonic Johnny is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:26 AM   #130
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by ciGarski View Post
so do they like it?
oh they gave it 4/5 too

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:29 AM   #131
ninsp
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Location: lol wut
Posts: 1,129
Default

It's a beautiful album. Glad it is less electronic.

It's extremely slow and mellow, so, if you dig that...

Much more jazzy and live instrument based, which is refreshing for a Radiohead album.

 
ninsp is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 01:05 PM   #132
Elphenor
Socialphobic
 
Elphenor's Avatar
 
Location: Lizzy Mercier Descloux
Posts: 13,139
Default

This is really beautiful stuff so far lovin it

 
Elphenor is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 01:46 PM   #133
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

I bought it about an hour ago. On first, cursory listen sounds pretty gorgeous and, to me, like a subdued mix of some of the best parts of every post OKC album. Not all of it grabs me instantly, but I'll give it a better listen tonight

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 02:39 PM   #134
redbreegull
Immortal
 
redbreegull's Avatar
 
Location: we are the new age of whatever
Posts: 25,619
Default

First impression:

some very beautiful stuff that takes the band in a slightly altered direction while mostly holding onto the minimalist ooooooaaaaahhh bleep bleep bloop that has characterized the second half of their career. I like it but I'm not sure it makes the kind of commanding statement I was hoping for like IR. I don't think it sounds uninspired, but it almost feels like the band feels they have nothing left to prove. I wouldn't say I am disappointed, and because it's Radiohead it's really difficult to make a judgement based on one listen, but I wish there were a little more energy on the album. Like a lot of their newer stuff, it's hard for me to shake the perception that Thom Yorke is doing 75% of the work

 
redbreegull is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 02:42 PM   #135
Elijah Moon
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Elijah Moon's Avatar
 
Location: In a sack opposite a broken toilet.
Posts: 1,896
Default

~Apparently Johnny Greenwood had a lot of input, writing the string parts, etc.

I don't like the snoring sounds at the end of 'Daydreaming'.

 
Elijah Moon is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 03:36 PM   #136
Disco King
Apocalyptic Poster
 
Disco King's Avatar
 
Location: "The worst poster on this board by far." -- The worst poster on this board by far
Posts: 4,244
Default

Downloading it now

Don't have to feel bad because I already bought the CD, I'm just waiting for it. So, I'm not really pirating any more than I would be if I just ripped the CD

I don't know why I'm justifying this as some exceptional case when most of the music I have on my harddrive is pirated anyway

 
Disco King is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 03:45 PM   #137
Elphenor
Socialphobic
 
Elphenor's Avatar
 
Location: Lizzy Mercier Descloux
Posts: 13,139
Default

Ful Stop is amazing goddamn Radiohead really hasn't missed a step

 
Elphenor is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 03:47 PM   #138
Elphenor
Socialphobic
 
Elphenor's Avatar
 
Location: Lizzy Mercier Descloux
Posts: 13,139
Default

It's so much like Faust which has to be one of their biggest influences

All of this stuff does what I think Radiohead did best with Kid A this Krautrock with a singer with an ear for pop hooks

Last edited by Elphenor : 05-09-2016 at 03:52 PM.

 
Elphenor is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 04:10 PM   #139
Elphenor
Socialphobic
 
Elphenor's Avatar
 
Location: Lizzy Mercier Descloux
Posts: 13,139
Default

i wonder if they'll be a live from the basement for this one

 
Elphenor is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 06:42 PM   #140
vixnix
Socialphobic
 
vixnix's Avatar
 
Location: That God you believe in must have had his head right up his arse if he took Luke and not you instead
Posts: 10,242
Default

It just sounds like more radiohead, to me.

 
vixnix is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 07:54 PM   #141
toase
Apocalyptic Poster
 
toase's Avatar
 
Location: AA meetings
Posts: 3,169
Default

I like it more than TKOL
the strings are a hit or miss for me, but I'm glad they went that direction, it is like the opposite from York's solo stuff

 
toase is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 08:40 PM   #142
redbreegull
Immortal
 
redbreegull's Avatar
 
Location: we are the new age of whatever
Posts: 25,619
Default

does anyone else think ending with True Love Waits is a really weird choice? how many of these songs are old?

 
redbreegull is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 08:43 PM   #143
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Arrow

usually artists start digging up old songs from the past when they are uninspired...

just sayin'.

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 08:52 PM   #144
Elphenor
Socialphobic
 
Elphenor's Avatar
 
Location: Lizzy Mercier Descloux
Posts: 13,139
Default

Idk how Ful Stop is anything but grade A Radiohead but that's just me

When the guitar really kicks in I'm full Yorker seizure dancing

 
Elphenor is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 08:57 PM   #145
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

tbh it's sounding a lot better to me today. coming around on it.
some of it still sounds oddly non engaging though. i'll listen to it a few more times before i'll really have an opinion.

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:13 PM   #146
redbreegull
Immortal
 
redbreegull's Avatar
 
Location: we are the new age of whatever
Posts: 25,619
Default

I'm about to get stupid high and lie on the floor listening to this, will check in later.

If i'm not back by morning assume the worst

 
redbreegull is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:21 PM   #147
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

wear a sweater honey and don't forget to put out the hellatrees in an ashtray before closing your eyes

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-09-2016, 09:22 PM   #148
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

i actually got some weed from some guy on the street the other day and it's the shittiest fucking weed i've ever bought. i don't even think it's got THC in it. so no listening party for me.

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 01:43 AM   #149
Cool As Ice Cream
Immortal
 
Cool As Ice Cream's Avatar
 
Location: František! How's the foot of your turtle?
Posts: 29,088
Default

was it oregano?

 
Cool As Ice Cream is offline
Reply With Quote
Old 05-10-2016, 01:50 AM   #150
teh b0lly!!1
Socialphobic
 
teh b0lly!!1's Avatar
 
Location: Your soul
Posts: 14,329
Default

IT DOES KINDA TASTE LIKE PIZZA LOL

 
teh b0lly!!1 is offline
Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On
Google


Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
bystarlight.org - am i doing something wrong? slunken Pumpkins Archive 326 05-16-2013 10:40 PM
So I listened to MACHINA 7 times today... EyesOfAJackal Pumpkins Archive 32 09-21-2012 09:59 PM
50,000. Nimrod's Son General Chat Archive 37 05-24-2007 03:05 PM
2007 Pisces Iscariot Reference Virex19 Pumpkins Archive 80 04-29-2007 04:01 AM
Cymbal Rush is NOT a new Radiohead song.... davin Music Board Archive 10 05-16-2006 04:13 AM


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 06:22 PM.



Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Smashing Pumpkins, Alternative Music
& General Discussion Message Board and Forums
www.netphoria.org - Copyright © 1998-2014