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-   -   can you cook? (http://forums.netphoria.org/showthread.php?t=164916)

slunken 05-17-2014 07:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charmbag (Post 4061467)
it's really boring to cook for one person so I don't really bother to try anything interesting

this right here

mxzombie 05-17-2014 09:31 PM

i never cook much for myself, except fried eggs for breakfast. i cook a lot with ******.

I've been the same weight +/-10 lb. for the last ten years

Lucky Day Spa 05-17-2014 10:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061466)
Living to a ripe old age and maintaining a editable quality of life at a ripe old age are two different things. In my opinion optimal human nourishment includes regular consumption of animal flesh.

that's not a matter of opinion, though. the best we can say is we have a vague picture of what 'optimal' human nourishment resembles, but it's fuzzy and not the same for everyone anyway. there is a growing consensus that vegetarian diets lead to better long term health outcomes.

for most people, therefore, the 'quality of life' factors are aesthetic/sensory rather than health-related; meat is a nutritionally-convenient source of protein, iron, vitamin b12 etc., but hardly the only option. it just tastes better than the alternatives, so people are understandably reluctant to give it up even if they feel bad about animal deaths being an unavoidable part of the process. i get that. my point was simply that a preference is not in the same category of ethical justification as survival.

(i agree with you that this is a continuum rather than a binary, but i'm defining 'survival' as something along the lines 'you get sick and die without it' or 'you have no other sources of food' – i.e., it is preference-agnostic.)

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061466)
Whether or not instransitive gratitude is misplaced, I still feel it. You claimed I couldn't feel gratitude in that instance. I disagree, I think intransitive gratitude is a fairly widespread phenomenon. It doesn't require the consent of an object because it's not directed at one. It could be part of a survival mechanism that allowed us to form and emotional connection to our environment, which motivated us to take better care of it, this enhance our chances of survival. Many subsistence/environmentally sustainable traditional cultures have thanksgiving rituals where the thanks they have for their harvest, spoils of hunt/ agriculture are given thanks for and I don't see a reason to suspect the gratitude is not real.

i never said you didn't feel it. i said the feeling was misplaced and suggested that it was potentially destructive.

to give you another example, consider the gratitude routinely expressed by political leaders for the 'sacrifices' soldiers make by dying in combat.

now, those soldiers and their families deserve respect, absolutely, but is gratitude really the right reaction? i mean, the situations in which those deaths occur arguably arise from the interaction of a multitude of inordinately complicated systems: the military-industrial complex, nation-building political narratives motivated by xenophobia and energy security, an uncritical or complicit media that regurgitates propaganda to a working class systematically kneecapped by a laissez-faire capitalist economy that increasingly accrues wealth to the wealthy, etc. etc.

i don't offer that as an analogy, just as an example of misplaced 'intransitive' gratitude. if it encourages complacency when further action would otherwise be deemed necessary, it's easy to see how it's a bad thing, right? it makes it easier to explain away problematic processes that happen to benefit us, and uncritically preserve the status quo.

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061466)
As for the non sequitur, the validity of that is tied up with the question of nutrition. If I didn't need to eat meat to maintain optimal condition I would consider giving it up because of the regret I feel. That isn't the case for me. I continue to eat meat because I think it is good for me and I am self interested - at the same time, I'm compassionate enough to feel regret about my own fairly un changeable nature.

i don't know how to read this. you're resistant to change so you'd rather not bother with self-reflection?

Trotskilicious 05-17-2014 11:37 PM

i think that sums it up nicely

Lucky Day Spa 05-18-2014 04:38 AM

made this tonight, with steamed broccolini: http://cuisine.co.nz/cuisine.nsf/rec...in-crazy-water

you can't go wrong with a dish called "fish in crazy water" imho

vixnix 05-18-2014 05:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucky Day Spa (Post 4061213)

gratitude for something taken without being given isn't gratitude

I read this as you saying you don't think I could be feeling gratitude of any kind, misguided or not, because gratitude requires an object.

vixnix 05-18-2014 05:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucky Day Spa (Post 4061492)
i don't know how to read this. you're resistant to change so you'd rather not bother with self-reflection?

I'm of Polynesian descent, the traditional diet includes regular intakes animal protein. Polynesians have consumed that diet for thousands of years and over that period I think it's likely that the survivors are the ones who were best adapted to it.

The wikipedia article you linked to lists a number of boutique grain products that have not been successfully commercially cultivated outside of their native environments, which is why places like Peru now grow huge amounts of a grain that was previously a staple, for export - they can barely afford to buy it, themselves. They eat imported junk. Rice is the same - the widespread cultivation of rice is a contributor to deforestation and has similar implications as it does for the Peruvians, for those who grow it as a cash crop.

Humans are mostly omnivores - and we've adapted to be omnivores because most environments it is the most sensible and sustainable diet, IMO. It doesn't make it the nicest diet, in terms of how we interact with our environment - but in terms of surviving as a group - I think it is the most sensible and sustainable diet.

Lucky Day Spa 05-18-2014 06:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061508)
I'm of Polynesian descent, the traditional diet includes regular intakes animal protein. Polynesians have consumed that diet for thousands of years and over that period I think it's likely that the survivors are the ones who were best adapted to it.

APPEAL TO TRADITION; CITATION NEEDED

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061508)
The wikipedia article you linked to lists a number of boutique grain products that have not been successfully commercially cultivated outside of their native environments, which is why places like Peru now grow huge amounts of a grain that was previously a staple, for export - they can barely afford to buy it, themselves. They eat imported junk. Rice is the same - the widespread cultivation of rice is a contributor to deforestation and has similar implications as it does for the Peruvians, for those who grow it as a cash crop.

NON SEQUITUR

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061508)
Humans are mostly omnivores - and we've adapted to be omnivores because most environments it is the most sensible and sustainable diet, IMO. It doesn't make it the nicest diet, in terms of how we interact with our environment - but in terms of surviving as a group - I think it is the most sensible and sustainable diet.

APPEAL TO TRADITION; CITATION NEEDED

Lucky Day Spa 05-18-2014 06:07 AM

oh, that's not a constructive method of conversation? SORRY

vixnix 05-18-2014 07:50 AM

If we're talking about a diet that enables survival, sustainability is part of that conversation. Claiming that we don't need to eat meat to stay alive because we can rely on plains of quinoa and rice to sustain us instead, is problematic if your bottom line is survival...climate change and peak oil are both going to affect a diet dependent on protein rich crops.

There are no studies that I'm aware of - Polynesians are a small group of humans, population-wise. That, and their long period of isolation from other human cultures means that interest in their traditions and diet is limited.

The main source for Samoans that I know is An Account of Samoan History up to 1918 by Teo Tuvale.

In it he writes:

For one meal: 1 pound of baked taro, one or two breadfruit averaging three quarters of a pound in weight, half a pound of fish, 3 papasami [sic], half a pound of pork and in addition anything else that can be procured or is prepared. This is usually followed by the juice of a cocoanut [sic]. If available the above foods and amounts will be consumed twice a day as the Samoan's digestive capacity seems to be limited only by his ability to procure the food or have it procured for him. The above foods and quantities have been checked several times from personal observation and should the amount consumed at a feast be mentioned one would be liable to be put down as a liar.

There are theories that to sail from one island to another, the convoy was often out at sea for long periods of time - so natural selection favoured those who were able to eat everything that was available, when it was made available, and store it preceding a long stretch of low calorie and fluid intake.

vixnix 05-18-2014 07:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061505)
I read this as you saying you don't think I could be feeling gratitude of any kind, misguided or not, because gratitude requires an object.

also you didn't really address this...

Bread Regal 05-18-2014 10:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lucky Day Spa (Post 4061510)
APPEAL TO TRADITION; CITATION NEEDED


NON SEQUITUR


APPEAL TO TRADITION; CITATION NEEDED

really i should have just had this approach from the beginning.

The exploding boy 05-18-2014 11:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by vixnix (Post 4061512)
If we're talking about a diet that enables survival, sustainability is part of that conversation. Claiming that we don't need to eat meat to stay alive because we can rely on plains of quinoa and rice to sustain us instead, is problematic if your bottom line is survival...climate change and peak oil are both going to affect a diet dependent on protein rich crops.



not sure how meat production is sustainable when it's about 20% responsible for greenhouse gas emissions.....

vixnix 05-18-2014 06:35 PM

Not all meat - mainly beef from what I understand.

null123 05-19-2014 02:43 AM

eating a vegan diet takes me to the brink of sanity, personally
and that's only fun for so long

slunken 05-19-2014 09:49 PM

Really happy with my red curry recipe as of tonight

slunken 05-19-2014 09:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Charmbag (Post 4061633)
eating a vegan diet takes me to the brink of sanity, personally
and that's only fun for so long

I go out for 16oz prime rib every other Saturday , personally

slunken 05-19-2014 09:51 PM

That's my new "big splurge" lol

hnibos 05-19-2014 10:01 PM

nice

The exploding boy 05-19-2014 10:09 PM

I'm really hungry right now. Third diet day. Please somebody tell me all the things i could be eating but am not.

mxzombie 05-19-2014 10:53 PM

rocks, uncooked rice, dirt, metal shavings

mxzombie 05-19-2014 10:54 PM

it's a blessing we all don't have to eat such things.

Trotskilicious 05-19-2014 11:51 PM

i figure i'm going to die soon

Order 66 05-20-2014 12:14 AM

RIP in peas

The exploding boy 05-20-2014 04:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mxzombie (Post 4061824)
rocks, uncooked rice, dirt, metal shavings

mmm...uncooked rice. That sweet taste of nothing at all as it breaks all my teeth weakened by cavities. It sounds really good to me right now.

sppunk 05-20-2014 10:37 AM

Made a smoothie this morning that contains avocado, spinach, banana, nonfat milk, cinnamon and vanilla.

It's green and tastes like a cookie. My mind is blown.

kelsome 05-20-2014 06:26 PM

I want to do smoothies, but whenever I start to get the stuff for it, I feel like it's more trouble than it's worth. I'm probably just lazy and cheap.


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