View Full Version : A fool enough to ALMOST sing it?


soniclovenoize
07-28-2012, 06:48 PM
Can't believe this hasn't been posted here!

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Fucking hilarious.

amoergosum
07-28-2012, 06:49 PM
Can't believe this hasn't been posted here!



Of course it has >>>
http://forums.netphoria.org/showthread.php?t=175185&page=3

soniclovenoize
07-28-2012, 06:52 PM
AAAAAahhhhhhhh Then disregard this thread then. :D

bunny
07-28-2012, 06:52 PM
I can totally see james re-doing this song, modifying the melody and dynamics, making it his own.

but hearing the drums try to hit the exact same punches is really tiresome.

Shallowed
07-28-2012, 07:18 PM
Holy fuck, this deserves its own thread.

James is a hilariously weak singer. It reminds me of Idol rejects. Everything else is pretty good, especially the guitar solo. I like the sounds that Jazzmaster makes. Weird how the solo just dort of cut off.

It's quite a nice arrangement. I liked how it went quiet when it got to "I just want to be me" and the little feedback sounding thing at the end.

BlissedandGone2
07-28-2012, 07:31 PM
oh good god hes awful

BlissedandGone2
07-28-2012, 07:32 PM
it's also weird to me that the lead player played the same solo

SPLATTER
07-28-2012, 07:38 PM
weak

Shawn Osmond
07-28-2012, 08:14 PM
Now would be a good time for A Perfect Circle to get back to making an album. I don't think James wants to go down this path of covering SP songs for the rest of his life.

slippedonshoe
07-28-2012, 08:22 PM
Now he's just trying to piss Billy off.

pavementtune
07-28-2012, 08:30 PM
He wasn't "covering a SP song" - you can't cover a song you co-wrote in the first place.

I'm not sure, but I don't think Iha played any SP song in one of his shows before. Or has he?

RenewRevive
07-28-2012, 09:06 PM
pretty touching sincere effort actually.

and as pavementtune said: how exactly is it a cover?

soniclovenoize
07-28-2012, 09:36 PM
Yeah, it's not technically a cover. He legally wrote 50% of it (unless there's specific contractual arrangements made, but honestly I'd doubt it).

But still, I can see Blew Away, The Boy, Believe or even Go. But Mayoniase? It's pushin it.

Monet LSD
07-28-2012, 09:52 PM
Interesting. Wonder if BC will ignore it, or throw a shit fit about it.

Also wonder if he played this to piss BC off, or if he just did it for the hell of it.

BlissedandGone2
07-28-2012, 09:57 PM
http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m7wg1oiGq11qb2nwno1_500.png

Monet LSD
07-28-2012, 10:01 PM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/LGtHdPF-NFg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

BurtSampson
07-28-2012, 10:06 PM
Interesting. Wonder if BC will ignore it, or throw a shit fit about it.

Also wonder if he played this to piss BC off, or if he just did it for the hell of it.

I feel like he did it because the crowd gave less than two shits about the rest of the stuff he was playing.

BurtSampson
07-28-2012, 10:24 PM
Monte is all asshurt about it on the O-board.

Iha has seemed to stay away from talking about the Pumpkins. So the fact that he is playing and singing this song is really odd.

I think it's also ironic that he sings "can anybody hear me, i just want to be me"
He might as well sing "I just want to be---Bill-yyyyy"

I think playing Smashing Pumpkins songs he wrote would of made much more sense. But of all the Pumpkins songs this was one he got some credit. After all he wrote a couple of chords for it. And was voted a fan favorite on Rolling Stones.

"would of"

Monet LSD
07-28-2012, 10:42 PM
Monte is all asshurt about it on the O-board:

"...And was voted a fan favorite on Rolling Stones."



"...on Rolling Stones."

Jesus.

http://cdn.myfonts.net/s/ec/cc-200804/Rolling_Stone-logo.gif

Monte is all asshurt about it on the O-board:

"...I think it's also ironic that he sings "can anybody hear me, i just want to be me"
He might as well sing "I just want to be---Bill-yyyyy"



Good god, this is one of the most ignorant and childish things I've ever heard.

:erm:

reprise85
07-28-2012, 10:45 PM
corgan and monte belong together. it's destiny.

BurtSampson
07-28-2012, 10:46 PM
corgan and monte belong together. it's destiny.

pure lunacy. incalculable. insufferable.

meangreensp
07-28-2012, 11:39 PM
Iha looks like an asian grandmother.

Either way, this is a hilariously hypocritical and somewhat pathetic thing of Iha to do. Thought he wanted to separate himself from the Pumpkins? Bullshit. He'd go back in an instant if Corgan said he could come back. Tool.

reprise85
07-29-2012, 12:15 AM
he just played a song he co wrote. it's not pathetic and it's probably not a jab at anyone, jesus christ

duovamp
07-29-2012, 12:29 AM
So... does this mean we can't shit on Billy for playing old SP songs with new people?

paranoid
07-29-2012, 12:51 AM
Kinda awkward to hear iha sing corgan lyrics.

I'd like to see billy play take me down now. Or the boy. Yeah let's go with the boy.

BlissedandGone2
07-29-2012, 12:57 AM
Iha looks like an asian grandmother.

Either way, this is a hilariously hypocritical and somewhat pathetic thing of Iha to do. Thought he wanted to separate himself from the Pumpkins? Bullshit. He'd go back in an instant if Corgan said he could come back. Tool.

You're an ignorant, Corgan kissass. Iha has been completely respectful towards the history and legacy of the Pumpkins. Billy is the one who has said he wants to separate today's pumpkins from the past pumpkins.

Iha can play whatever the hell he wants. Whether or not that will sound like total shit is another question entirely.

Shallowed
07-29-2012, 03:00 AM
Exactly, why should history have anything to do with what songs you're "allowed" to play?

He or Billy could play Pavement songs if they wanted to.

DeusExMachina
07-29-2012, 03:05 AM
inb4ihagetssued

houseofglass11
07-29-2012, 04:01 AM
Billy and James will reunite within the next few years, guaranteed

great poster
07-29-2012, 05:26 AM
inb4ihagetssued

on what grounds?

brutechinasky
07-29-2012, 05:46 AM
it's just his passive-aggressive way to reply to the "worst human being i've ever met" quote

BlissedandGone2
07-29-2012, 05:59 AM
iha had enough in 99/00, dumbass. giving up ain't respectful.

Yes, I see your point, because D'arcy, Jimmy, and Billy all seemed super motivated, happy, and together during their last year as a band. Oh wait.....

And even though I think that you pointing out that Iha "had enough" in the year that the band broke up is moronic and nonsensical, for the record, I was talking about Iha's view of the band vs. Billy's view and actions post breakup.

Reyngel
07-29-2012, 06:02 AM
To be honest, James' vocals sound a million times better than Billy's right now.

I approve. Sounded good, too.

Billy isn't the only one who can represent The Smashing Pumpkins, and that includes their songs. The band was always more than just him, whether he wants to admit that or not.

Monet LSD
07-29-2012, 09:59 AM
on what grounds?

"billy would of sued"

Monet LSD
07-29-2012, 10:21 AM
Iha looks like an asian grandmother.

What the fuck does this even mean...? What is an "asian grandmother"? He looks great. I'm sure he looks way better than you.

Thought he wanted to separate himself from the Pumpkins? Bullshit. He'd go back in an instant if Corgan said he could come back. Tool.

When did James ever say that he wanted to separate himself from SP? He hasn't said shit. He's remained the more tasteful person & avoided the dramatic bullshit that Corgan has instigated.

Monet LSD
07-29-2012, 10:25 AM
Tool.

Lol @ you calling James a "tool" when him playing a simple hour-long show in Japan is way more than what you've probably accomplished in the last 6-12 months. Actually, more than you'll probably ever accomplish, period.

meangreensp
07-29-2012, 11:29 AM
Lol @ you calling James a "tool" when him playing a simple hour-long show in Japan is way more than what you've probably accomplished in the last 6-12 months. Actually, more than you'll probably ever accomplish, period.

No shit I'm not a famous musician. If I was, I wouldn't be on here, would I? What a childish and just overall stupid argument that is. It's like the people who are like "YOU CAN'T SAY NICKELBACK SUX YOU AREN'T A MUSICIAN".

I should've expected someone so obsessed with an autistic child that you named your name after him, put a picture of him as your avatar and made a reference to him in your location. So, nevermind, my bad.

Anyway, I really do think that at some point, whether it be in ten or twenty years the original Pumpkins will get back together. Once Schroeder, Fiorentino and Byrne all move on. Maybe without D'Arcy, but this just surprised me because Iha seemed to want to forget the Pumpkins ever happened.

reprise85
07-29-2012, 11:55 AM
Aggressive much?

GLOWer
07-29-2012, 12:34 PM
No shit I'm not a famous musician. If I was, I wouldn't be on here, would I? What a childish and just overall stupid argument that is. It's like the people who are like "YOU CAN'T SAY NICKELBACK SUX YOU AREN'T A MUSICIAN".

I should've expected someone so obsessed with an autistic child that you named your name after him, put a picture of him as your avatar and made a reference to him in your location. So, nevermind, my bad.

Anyway, I really do think that at some point, whether it be in ten or twenty years the original Pumpkins will get back together. Once Schroeder, Fiorentino and Byrne all move on. Maybe without D'Arcy, but this just surprised me because Iha seemed to want to forget the Pumpkins ever happened.

"named your name"

reprise85
07-29-2012, 12:37 PM
can i just again point out that redbreegull's cover shits on iha's

brutechinasky
07-29-2012, 12:52 PM
can we just point out again that iha's is not a cover



(just to be anal)

soniclovenoize
07-29-2012, 01:28 PM
can i just again point out that redbreegull's cover shits on iha's

Yeah I think my only criticism is that his (meaning Iha's) voice is just simply not suited for Corgan's idiosyncratic vocal style. That's one reason Corgan could pull of Landslide, because he's essentially a male Stevie Nicks.

Just because he could ("Hey I wrote 50% of this song, I'll sing it!") doesn't mean he should. Fuck, my shitty voice is better suited for a Corgan song than Iha. :/

samuel redman
07-29-2012, 01:36 PM
when was Iha's voice ever a factor in his songs or even seeing him live

slunken
07-29-2012, 02:20 PM
this all just means we're going to see mayonaise added to the sp setlist. snarky pre-song comments to follow.

Dogfighter28
07-29-2012, 02:39 PM
I thought it was pretty good. The subtle variations in the arrangement were really tasteful to suit Iha's style IMO.

brutechinasky
07-29-2012, 03:10 PM
I agree, only the singing is shitty

rottenugly
07-29-2012, 03:25 PM
can i just again point out that redbreegull's cover shits on ihop

.

soniclovenoize
07-29-2012, 04:10 PM
when was Iha's voice ever a factor in his songs or even seeing him live

Because this is vocal-based music. If it wasn't, then every Smashing Pumpkins song would be instrumental.

paranoid
07-29-2012, 04:59 PM
I has live voice has always sounded bad.. So why is everyone shocked by that? He ain't corgan, but shit his voice could suck live at times too. Other than that, I enjoyed this performance.

iPumpkin
07-29-2012, 07:23 PM
Iha should play an Oceania song, that would be hilarious!

Esty
07-29-2012, 08:37 PM
This is awesome.


Everyone complaining and bitching about him singing this song can go fuck themselves. He half wrote the song, he can sing it if he wants to.

reprise85
07-29-2012, 08:58 PM
he has a right to sing it, doesn't mean he doesn't sound like shit though

TuralyonW3
07-29-2012, 09:37 PM
I honestly sang this song better in my eight grade talent show

Cool he's playing though. He should play the boy

redbreegull
07-29-2012, 09:48 PM
Voice sounds pretty bad. It's not well suited to the song. It's not like Billy Corgan hasn't played a thousand shows where his voice sounded worse though

RenewRevive
07-29-2012, 10:14 PM
it doesn't matter whether he has writing credits or not. as an ex-member of SP, he's as entitled to play any songs recorded up to 2000 as billy is. and they wouldn't be "covers" either, as james was in the fucking band.

Monty: that is such a dick move. very poor form.

redbreegull
07-29-2012, 10:44 PM
I think it would be weird if he had played a song with his name not attached to it... Dave Grohl doesn't play Nirvana songs except for the one he wrote, for good reason. It would just seem odd

BlissedandGone2
07-29-2012, 10:49 PM
he's as entitled to play any songs recorded up to 2000 as billy is.

nah.

soniclovenoize
07-29-2012, 11:22 PM
I think it would be weird if he had played a song with his name not attached to it... Dave Grohl doesn't play Nirvana songs except for the one he wrote, for good reason. It would just seem odd

I actually thought it was odd when he did Marigold. :noway:

rottenugly
07-29-2012, 11:43 PM
I actually thought it was odd when he did Marigold. :noway:

I saw Foo Fighters play Marigold in March 2008 and I was like "WOAH this is some cool shit."

rottenugly
07-29-2012, 11:43 PM
It was nice seeing Pat and Dave on the same stage.

redbreegull
07-29-2012, 11:50 PM
The last time I bothered seeing them was in 2006 and I am pretty sure they played Marigold for the first time then. I thought it was cool, and since he wrote it, there's nothing wrong with him playing it. I mean, it's not weird that Paul McCartney can still play Hey Jude

pale_princess
07-30-2012, 12:36 AM
guys it really warmed my heart, okay?

reprise85
07-30-2012, 01:07 AM
anyone can cover anything, hell i say james should skip the bullshit and just try to rival XYU

rottenugly
07-30-2012, 01:27 AM
Bot deleted. Cannot believe I'm INB4 SLUNKEN :smoke:

soniclovenoize
07-30-2012, 02:29 AM
Here's the really weird thing: Nirvana allegedly soundchecked Alone + Easy Target in 1994.

Can you imagine Cobain singing it?

I can and it's wonderful.

Shallowed
07-30-2012, 02:47 AM
anyone can cover anything, hell i say james should skip the bullshit and just try to rival XYU

This makes me wonder, what is the most aggressive song that is written solely by James?

Ball and Chain, maybe; if he wrote it.

DeusExMachina
07-30-2012, 05:54 AM
on what grounds?

On the grounds that I don't know man it's just a joke about how insane Billy is.

Raskolnikov
07-30-2012, 10:43 AM
Here's the really weird thing: Nirvana allegedly soundchecked Alone + Easy Target in 1994.

Can you imagine Cobain singing it?

I can and it's wonderful.

Fascinating. One of the better songs off the s/t. Or maybe it was another one where they were planning on letting Dave sing?

To stay on the Mayonaise topic - I wonder if this trend of his will continue. That said, I think it would have been way more logical for him to play one of his songs, The Bells, The Boy - whatever - over this. It's just weird feeling. Performing a little bit more lightweight of an SP song could have been doable, but he went full throttle... the only thing that would have been comparably ballsy would have been Soma. Maybe that's next?

Slurpee
07-30-2012, 11:00 AM
Now I am DEFINITELY going to his solo show.

soniclovenoize
07-30-2012, 11:36 AM
Fascinating. One of the better songs off the s/t. Or maybe it was another one where they were planning on letting Dave sing?

I really don't know. I know Dave and Krist recorded demos of February Stars and Big Me at the You Know Your Right sessions, and the rumor specifically singled out Alone + Easy Target (I wanna say it was a soundcheck in Australia? Not sure). So it's clear that Dave had an albums's worth of good songs just in the can that fit Nirvana's vibe anyways, the band new some of them, and then the theory was that Cobain had writers block at that time anyways. So, well, you never know...

Slurpee
07-30-2012, 12:27 PM
To stay on the Mayonaise topic - I wonder if this trend of his will continue. That said, I think it would have been way more logical for him to play one of his songs, The Bells, The Boy - whatever - over this. It's just weird feeling. Performing a little bit more lightweight of an SP song could have been doable, but he went full throttle... the only thing that would have been comparably ballsy would have been Soma. Maybe that's next?

It is a bit strange that he picked Mayo. Makes it seem like it was done to prove a point. Or maybe the festival organizers asked that he play a "popular SP song" to get a good billing. I remember Billy complaining that they were asking Zwan to play SP songs in order to get higher on the marquee at big shows.

pale_princess
07-30-2012, 12:56 PM
he was probably just like "y'know. it's a really really good song. people will enjoy hearing it. why not play it?" i doubt there was any motive behind it.

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 01:01 PM
I really don't know. I know Dave and Krist recorded demos of February Stars and Big Me at the You Know Your Right sessions, and the rumor specifically singled out Alone + Easy Target (I wanna say it was a soundcheck in Australia? Not sure). So it's clear that Dave had an albums's worth of good songs just in the can that fit Nirvana's vibe anyways, the band new some of them, and then the theory was that Cobain had writers block at that time anyways. So, well, you never know...

Alone + Easy Target fucking rocks:rockon:

they probably would have let Dave sing it though. Interesting how Foo Fighters s/t is pretty stylistically similar to Nirvana

soniclovenoize
07-30-2012, 01:08 PM
Yeah it very much is!

I can really picture Cobain singing the chorus with his grovely voice though.

themadcaplaughs
07-30-2012, 01:19 PM
he was probably just like "y'know. it's a really really good song. people will enjoy hearing it. why not play it?" i doubt there was any motive behind it.


QFT

Slurpee
07-30-2012, 02:11 PM
he was probably just like "y'know. it's a really really good song. people will enjoy hearing it. why not play it?"

Yeah but even him saying that about one of their songs has a bit of motive behind it. You can't take it that much out of context, especially when Billy is still parading Mikey & Co. around playing the song as well.

I just bought tix to the Iha show at Mercury Lounge and I am going to yell SPITEFACE the entire time.

Woody
07-30-2012, 04:05 PM
Genuinely laughing out loud at the idea of Iha trolling Billy in this passive aggressive way. Iha should record a studio version and add it as a bonus track on the US Look To The Sky. :rofl:

pale_princess
07-30-2012, 04:28 PM
Yeah but even him saying that about one of their songs has a bit of motive behind it. You can't take it that much out of context, especially when Billy is still parading Mikey & Co. around playing the song as well.

I just bought tix to the Iha show at Mercury Lounge and I am going to yell SPITEFACE the entire time.

make that no ulterior motive ;)

jealous. can't make any of the us tour dates this time around :(

Cade McNown
07-30-2012, 04:32 PM
So let me get this straight, 3 randoms can play the instrument parts on all SP songs, but James can't sing a song he is co-credited in writing?

amoergosum
07-30-2012, 04:39 PM
http://i.qkme.me/3rjq.jpg

pale_princess
07-30-2012, 04:39 PM
So let me get this straight, 3 randoms can play the instrument parts on all SP songs, but James can't sing a song he is co-credited in writing?

:banging:

amoergosum
07-30-2012, 04:47 PM
When I say 'pitchy' you say 'dawg!'...
pitchy
dawg!
pitchy!
dawg!

>>>


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pYNAug4Kr2c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

BlissedandGone2
07-30-2012, 05:05 PM
want to reiterate that most people in here think James can do what he wants, but also that he sounds like a 5th grader.

Reyngel
07-30-2012, 05:11 PM
I think over the course of time, people have forgotten:


1. that James co-founded The Smashing Pumpkins

2. that James was in The Smashing Pumpkins for over 13 years

3. that James was the only member of the The Smashing Pumpkins to not get kicked out

4. that James wrote the riffs and melodies for Mayonaise and Soma for The Smashing Pumpkins

5. that James wrote, sang on and arranged other songs for The Smashing Pumpkins, too, like Blew Away, Take Me Down, ...Said Sadly, Go, The Boy and Summer

6. that Billy used to claim that "without James, there wouldn't be The Smashing Pumpkins."


So, not only is James allowed to perform Mayonaise, I think he's damn-well entitled to. He's never had anything but positive remarks when asked loaded questions about the past. He's stepped aside the trash-talking and literally explained that he prefers to remember what was good about The Smashing Pumpkins. He's the antithesis of drama. And if it weren't for Billy taking the opposite route these last 12 years by trashing James' name and reputation the way he's done to everyone else, no one would have any problems with him playing it now.

James has never said he wanted to distance himself from The Smashing Pumpkins, or its songs. The fact is, he's simply not said ANYTHING. So if he wants to play a song that belongs to him, who the fuck cares.

Reyngel
07-30-2012, 05:16 PM
When I say 'pitchy' you say 'dawg!'...
pitchy
dawg!
pitchy!
dawg!

>>>


<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/pYNAug4Kr2c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>



By the way, James clearly sings "I know you'll know... carry on." But Billy's "official" lyrics in the reissue have it as "I know you'll know... I'm yours."

Who wants to bet Billy had no idea what the lyrics were, and just copy-pasted incorrect lyrics from some site like SPFC or something?

soniclovenoize
07-30-2012, 07:00 PM
I think over the course of time, people have forgotten:


1. that James co-founded The Smashing Pumpkins

2. that James was in The Smashing Pumpkins for over 13 years

3. that James was the only member of the The Smashing Pumpkins to not get kicked out

4. that James wrote the riffs and melodies for Mayonaise and Soma for The Smashing Pumpkins

5. that James wrote, sang on and arranged other songs for The Smashing Pumpkins, too, like Blew Away, Take Me Down, ...Said Sadly, Go, The Boy and Summer

6. that Billy used to claim that "without James, there wouldn't be The Smashing Pumpkins."


So, not only is James allowed to perform Mayonaise, I think he's damn-well entitled to. He's never had anything but positive remarks when asked loaded questions about the past. He's stepped aside the trash-talking and literally explained that he prefers to remember what was good about The Smashing Pumpkins. He's the antithesis of drama. And if it weren't for Billy taking the opposite route these last 12 years by trashing James' name and reputation the way he's done to everyone else, no one would have any problems with him playing it now.

James has never said he wanted to distance himself from The Smashing Pumpkins, or its songs. The fact is, he's simply not said ANYTHING. So if he wants to play a song that belongs to him, who the fuck cares.

OK, would Dave Grohl be "allowed" to play Smells Like Teen Spirit at a Foo Fighters show? He was in the band for half their career and co-wrote the song.

pale_princess
07-30-2012, 09:21 PM
sure, why not?

myosis
07-30-2012, 09:28 PM
i don't understand how people can interpret this as a diss to billy...
he's pretty serious while singing it. can't it just be a tribute to their glorious past together?

soniclovenoize
07-30-2012, 09:41 PM
sure, why not?

I... I don't know. :think:

Monet LSD
07-30-2012, 10:46 PM
Who wants to bet Billy had no idea what the lyrics were, and just copy-pasted incorrect lyrics from some site like SPFC or something?

Haha :D

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 10:49 PM
OK, would Dave Grohl be "allowed" to play Smells Like Teen Spirit at a Foo Fighters show? He was in the band for half their career and co-wrote the song.

did Dave Grohl co-write Smells Like Teen Spirit? Jimmy laid down drum parts for the majority of SP songs but that does not equal a writing credit

rottenugly
07-30-2012, 10:51 PM
no you're thinking of scentless apprentice.

rottenugly
07-30-2012, 10:51 PM
i might be mistaken though.

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 10:52 PM
yeah Grohl wrote the guitar riff for Scentless Apprentice

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 10:53 PM
errr maybe it was serve the servants

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 10:53 PM
yes I think it was Serve the Servants, that one sounds much more Foo Fighters

BlissedandGone2
07-30-2012, 10:53 PM
did Dave Grohl co-write Smells Like Teen Spirit? Jimmy laid down drum parts for the majority of SP songs but that does not equal a writing credit

http://24.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_m80811nyOS1qb2nwno1_500.png

rottenugly
07-30-2012, 10:55 PM
chris wrote the bassline
dave wrote the drumline
kurt wrote everything else

redbreegull
07-30-2012, 10:59 PM
writing credits don't really mean anything I guess. Virtually every Beatles song is credited as Lennon/McCartney, but the two hardly collaborated at all. Some bands consider adding instrumental parts as worthy of a writing credit, and others don't consider this as having significantly added to the "writing" of the song

D.
07-30-2012, 11:00 PM
The Benzedrine Monks of Santo Domonica version of Teen Spirit is the penultimate one.

reprise85
07-30-2012, 11:48 PM
lol @ benzedrine monks of santa *******a

ping-ping
07-31-2012, 01:17 AM
I hope he plays this at his US shows.

It is a little strange to hear Billy's lyrics coming out of James's mouth, but I think most people can identify with at least one part of that song. It's not so far-fetched to believe that James has an emotional attachment to those words as well -- it's a great song with universal appeal, not some personal reclamation ("Haha! I'm singing your song! It's all mine now!") or jab at Billy. His voice is flat right up front which is unfortunate*, but overall I think it's a decent rendition and certainly the ending is very good. I'd love to hear him do a studio version but doubt he'd ever take on what's already on SD.

(*His vocals were quite good when I saw him in April in the States...I was pleasantly surprised because the first acoustic show in Japan sounded kinda awful and in general I'm used to his live vocals being underwhelming. Maybe he's super noivas or tired in Asia for whatever reason?)

Shallowed
07-31-2012, 02:21 AM
James never wrote songs with The Cure. He never recorded any parts on their albums. He was never even a member. Yet he had the audacity to do shit like THIS?:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tqFoTFMpD40" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

BurtSampson
07-31-2012, 03:00 AM
another Monte quote:

"You may have heard that James sung Smashing Pumpkins song Mayonaise. A song he was credited to write the intro part for. Since James departure from the Pumpkins he has made very little mention of the band.

Billy said James gave him a tape cassette player and he wrote the rest of the song."

A TAPE CASSETTE PLAYER?

pavementtune
07-31-2012, 03:01 AM
So? I don't see your point. Travis sang Britney Spears, Placebo Pixies, a bunch of peolpe play U2 and Pink Floyd without having written any of it.

rottenugly
07-31-2012, 03:03 AM
James never wrote songs with The Cure. He never recorded any parts on their albums. He was never even a member. Yet he had the audacity to do shit like THIS?:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tqFoTFMpD40" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Fucking D'arcy interrupting him. Cringe. Just let him do the fucking song.

rottenugly
07-31-2012, 03:16 AM
another Monte quote:

"You may have heard that James sung Smashing Pumpkins song Mayonaise. A song he was credited to write the intro part for. Since James departure from the Pumpkins he has made very little mention of the band.

Billy said James gave him a tape cassette player and he wrote the rest of the song."

A TAPE CASSETTE PLAYER?

http://i49.tinypic.com/2127als.jpg

rottenugly
07-31-2012, 03:17 AM
Also available on LASERDISC and VHS!

BurtSampson
07-31-2012, 03:39 AM
I'll buy it on Tape Cassette thank you.

Cool As Ice Cream
07-31-2012, 04:16 AM
monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Iha has seemed to stay away from talking about the Pumpkins. So the fact that he is playing and singing this song is really odd.

I think it's also ironic that he sings "can anybody hear me, i just want to be me"
He might as well sing "I just want to be---Bill-yyyyy"

I think playing Smashing Pumpkins songs he wrote would of made much more sense. But of all the Pumpkins songs this was one he got some credit. After all he wrote a couple of chords for it. And was voted a fan favorite on Rolling Stones (http://www.rollingstone.com/music/pictures/readers-poll-the-best-smashing-pumpkins-songs-20120613/1-mayonaise-0323162).


Some might say this was bad mouthing
http://www.starla.org/articles/atnj.htm

ATN: Do you feel like Smashing Pumpkins has been misunderstood by the media?

Iha: The main focus has been on Billy. Yeah, the music's been misunderstood and the band's been misunderstood but Billy caused a lot of those problems with those first slew of interviews he did. Basically the media just played to it and that was the angle on the whole last album. Yeah, I don't think people understand the band dynamic and I don't think people understand the music really well. You just get a dominant front person and you don't ever hear about the band or the records. It's like, what did people talk about Nirvana? They talked about Kurt, they talked about Courtney Love, heroin abuse and smashing guitars and punk rock. They never talked about how good the songs were, how good the lyrics were. Even on the second one. No one talked about how good the record was. So that's the same thing. They have the front person, they did their focus on the last album, that was it.


I think people are missing my point (and likely on purpose) about why I think this is in poor taste.

Here is a guy who played with the Pumpkins from 1987-2000 and since then hasn't said hardly a word about the Pumpkins and his time in it. And 12 years later out of the blue sky he plays a Pumpkin song. :scatch:

Its one thing to cover another band you never were in and something else when you go 12 years ignoring you pass (likely on purpose) to all of sudden play a Pumpkin song you didn't write on your own. He has a handful of songs of his own from his days he could of sung, Blew Away, Summer, Go, Take Me Down, The Boy, The Bells, ...Said Sadly, Bugg Superstar. If he had played one of these songs it would of been strange too but not as much as this.

meangreensp
07-31-2012, 04:21 AM
Can Monte write anything grammatically correct? He must have Asperger's Syndrome. Or just be fucking retarded.

amoergosum
07-31-2012, 04:22 AM
Latest blog post
>>>

Billy was interviewed on The Morning Show today and said about Oceania “fans see it has a touch of a past”. He also mentions his memoir that he is working on and he talked about being at Neil Young house and going into a genuine native american teepee on his property in Northern California. He went in it with Marilyn Manson, Lou Reed, and Neil, to which he said “you can just imagine that round-table”. Billy does mention that their are many people who he’d love to collaborate with when the host suggested Justin Bieber. To which Billy does jest about Justin Bieber has more dolls than he has.

Cool As Ice Cream
07-31-2012, 04:31 AM
fookin'ell.

can we all put in some money to have monty "put down"? how much would that cost? and what would be the cheapest option: vet or hitman?

brendo_91
07-31-2012, 04:47 AM
So let me get this straight

James can't sing

correct, sir

Monet LSD
07-31-2012, 04:57 AM
monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Originally Posted by MonteLDS
Some might say this was bad mouthing
http://www.starla.org/articles/atnj.htm

ATN: Do you feel like Smashing Pumpkins has been misunderstood by the media?

Iha: The main focus has been on Billy. Yeah, the music's been misunderstood and the band's been misunderstood but Billy caused a lot of those problems with those first slew of interviews he did. Basically the media just played to it and that was the angle on the whole last album. Yeah, I don't think people understand the band dynamic and I don't think people understand the music really well. You just get a dominant front person and you don't ever hear about the band or the records. It's like, what did people talk about Nirvana? They talked about Kurt, they talked about Courtney Love, heroin abuse and smashing guitars and punk rock. They never talked about how good the songs were, how good the lyrics were. Even on the second one. No one talked about how good the record was. So that's the same thing. They have the front person, they did their focus on the last album, that was it.



^ A logical, reasonable, and fairly eloquent statement like this is "badmouthing"? But calling someone "a piece of shit" and "one of the worst human beings I've ever met" isn't?

rottenugly
07-31-2012, 05:03 AM
Can Monte write anything grammatically correct? He must have Asperger's Syndrome.

If Monte is an Aspie, then he's an insult to other people with Asperger's Syndrome.

Monet LSD
07-31-2012, 05:03 AM
monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Originally Posted by MonteLDS

playing songs he wrote would of made much more sense

Jesus.

monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Originally Posted by MonteLDS

when you go 12 years ignoring you pass (likely on purpose) to all of sudden play a Pumpkin song



:erm:

monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Originally Posted by MonteLDS

he could of sung, Blew Away



:erm:

monty thinks it's in poor taste.

Originally Posted by MonteLDS

it would of been strange too but not as much as this.



:erm:

Shallowed
07-31-2012, 06:01 AM
PLAY BUGG SUPERSTAR!!

Shallowed
07-31-2012, 06:02 AM
You know, that fun little electro interlude ditty about your now dead beloved dog?

Slurpee
07-31-2012, 07:18 AM
writing credits don't really mean anything I guess. Virtually every Beatles song is credited as Lennon/McCartney, but the two hardly collaborated at all.

That is absolutely not true. Up until the White Album, Lennon & McCartney collaborated on virtually every song in the Beatles catalog. True, one of them would usually come up with the first ideas for a song, but they would then develop the idea together, and most of the songs can be very accurately labeled as co-written. When McCartney wrote "Yesterday" on his own, it was so out of the ordinary that the band and George Martin seriously discussed releasing it as a solo record.

Not to derail the thread, but if you're going to use historical examples you should at least have a vague idea what you're talking about.

amoergosum
07-31-2012, 07:53 AM
The Lennon–McCartney (also written Lennon/McCartney) songwriting partnership is one of the best-known and most successful musical collaborations in history. Between 1962 and 1969, the partnership published approximately 180 jointly credited songs, of which the vast majority were recorded by The Beatles and form the bulk of their catalogue.

Unlike many songwriting partnerships that comprise separate lyricist and composer, both John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote words and music. Sometimes, especially early on, they would collaborate extensively when writing songs, working "eyeball to eyeball". Later, it became more common for one of the two credited authors to write all or most of a song with limited input from the other. However, by an agreement made before The Beatles became famous, Lennon and McCartney agreed to share equal writing credit on songs that either one of them wrote while their partnership lasted.

Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lennon%E2%80%93McCartney

amoergosum
07-31-2012, 08:07 AM
Inside the Lennon/McCartney Connection >>>



It's supremely odd how history would play the collaboration between John Lennon and Paul McCartney. The result of one of the most intertwined partnerships in music history, their work would consistently be reduced to static roles. It's almost as if, faced with the bound pair, a culture obsessed with individualism found a way to cleave them in two.

Take, for example, the relentless focus on "John" songs versus *****" songs—or sections of songs, or single lines—as though that's the skeleton key to the Beatles' inner workings.

Actually, this tradition has an impeccable source: John and Paul themselves. The irony is that the way they came to tell their own story, after their split, may speak less to the way they separated and more to the way that they remained connected.

First, consider the usual take. "Now your songs were co-credited, you know, in the Beatles era," Terry Gross said to Paul in a 2001 interview. "My understanding is, correct me if I'm wrong, that many of the songs were written by one of you or the other, although the other would do some editing on the song, but that few of the songs were actually true collaborations."

"Is that right?" she asked. "Is that accurate?"

In response, Paul gave what has become a kind of official history: In the early days, he said, he and John were constantly in each other's presence, and "everything was co-written; we hardly ever wrote things separate."

Then, after a few years, as we got a bit of success with the Beatles and didn't actually live together or weren't just always on the road together sharing hotel rooms, then we had the luxury of writing things separately. So John would write something like "Nowhere Man," sort of separately in his house outside London, and I would write something like "Yesterday" quite separately on my own, and as you say we would come together and check 'em out against each other. Sometimes we would edit a line of each other's. More often, we'd just sort of say, "Yeah, that's great."

This bit—clear, ordered, and apparently airtight—is typical of McCartney. Lennon delivered basically the same message in a 1970 interview with Jann Wenner and, typical for him, he both far overstated the case and then doubled around to underscore its true ambiguity.

"When did your songwriting partnership with Paul end?" Wenner asked.

"That ended," Lennon jumped in quickly, and then he paused for several seconds. "I don't know, around 1962, or something." He laughed, and it sounds like a nervous laugh, or maybe he was announcing a joke: 1962 is when Paul and John first began laying their compositions down on studio tape for George Martin at EMI."I don't know," Lennon went on. "I mean, if you give me the albums I can tell you exactly who wrote what, you know, and which line. I mean, we sometimes wrote together and sometimes didn't but all our best work—apart from the early days, like 'I Want To Hold Your Hand' we wrote together and things like that—we wrote apart always, you know."

Then he returned to the question and contradicted himself. "We always wrote separately," he said, "but we wrote together because … because we enjoyed it a lot sometimes, and also because they'd say, 'Well, you're going to make an album?' We'd get together and knock off a few songs, you know, just like a job."

John's statement sounds like nonsense: "We always wrote separately but we wrote together." It's impossible to straighten into a literal meaning. But it actually captures the reality of their collaboration quite well.

Sometimes, it's true, songs tumbled out of their creators in whole. It's telling that McCartney seized the two clearest examples—"Yesterday" and "Nowhere Man"—when he described the collaboration to Terry Gross. On waking one morning, Paul sat down and practically transcribed the music for "Yesterday" on piano, using nonsense lyrics at first—"Scrambled egg … ." "Nowhere Man" has a parallel story. After five hours trying to write a song, and failing, John gave up in frustration. "Then," he told Playboy in 1980, " 'Nowhere Man' came, words and music, the whole damn thing as I lay down."

Neither experience was typical. For one thing, even when John and Paul were apart, they were constantly in touch, according to Cynthia Lennon's account of John's process. (She had a firsthand view through mid-1968). John had a studio in their attic and he went there at all odd times. "Then," Cynthia wrote, "there would be phone calls back and forth to Paul, as they played and sang to each other over the phone."

John and Paul also met frequently to work. In 1967, the journalist Hunter Davies sat in on several of those sessions. One priceless account shows the slow, ambling course of discovery on the way toward "A Little Help From My Friends."

They started around 2 p.m. in Paul's workroom, a narrow, rectangular space full of instruments and amps and modern art. The previous afternoon, they'd gotten the tune for the song. Now they were trying to polish the melody and write lyrics. John took up his guitar and Paul banged at the piano. "Each seemed to be in a trance," Davies wrote, "until the other came up with something good, then he would pluck it out of a mass of noises and try it himself."

"Are you afraid when you turn out the light?" John offered.

Paul repeated the line, agreeing it was good. John said they could begin each of the verses with a question. He offered another one. "Do you believe in love at first sight?" "No," he interrupted himself. "It hasn't got the right number of syllables." He tried singing the line breaking it in two between "believe" and "in love."

"How about 'Do you believe in a love at first sight?' " Paul offered. John sang that, and instantly added another line. "Yes I'm certain that it happens all the time." They repeated these three lines over and over again. It was now five o'clock. Some others came by, and as they bantered about, Paul started doodling on the piano before breaking out into "Can't Buy Me Love." John joined in, shouting and laughing. Then they both shouted out "Tequila."

"Remember in Germany?" John said. "We used to shout out everything." They did the song again, with John throwing in words in every pause—"Knickers" and "Duke of Edinburgh" and "Hitler."

"Then, as suddenly as it had started," Davies wrote, "they both went back to the work at hand."

John sang a slight modification of the line they'd agreed on. "What do you see when you turn out the light?" Then he answered the question: "I can't tell you, but I know it's mine." Paul said that would do and wrote the four lines on a piece of exercise paper propped up on the piano. Then they broke for cake.

Had Jann Wenner picked up Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, pointed to the second track, and took Lennon up on his offer to say "exactly who wrote what, you know, and which line," could Lennon have said honestly he had written that day's material? Sure. The only explicit edit of Paul's was the indefinite article "a."

Yet, looking for concrete divisions in their labor, though not irrelevant, can certainly seem myopic. It feels, from Davies' account, as though the two men were bound by a thousand invisible strings.

Davies looked on at the partners before Yoko, before The White Album— "the tension album" Paul said. But tension had always been key to their work. The strings connecting them hardly dissolved, even in the times when the collaboration was adversarial, the kind of exchange that Andre Agassi described when he said that, if he hadn't faced Pete Sampras, he'd have a better record, "but I'd be less." Picking up on that incisive line, Michael Kimmelman wrote in his review of Agassi's book Open that "rivalry … [is] the heart of sports, and, for athletes, no matter how bitter or fierce, something strangely akin to love: two vulnerable protagonists for a time lifted up not despite their differences but because of them."

But even in the hardest times, it's hardly true that John and Paul stopped working together. In what was, ostensibly, the nadir of their partnership in January 1969, their concert on the Apple rooftop shows the two men in profound sympathy. At one point, John forgot a verse to "Don't Let Me Down." He and Paul proceeded in perfect sync as John sang nonsense lyrics, then returned to the top of the verse as if nothing had happened. You can see on the film how John shoots Paul a look of pure boyish glee. Several months later, when John wrote "The Ballad of John and Yoko," he rushed to Paul's doorstep. With George and Ringo out of town, he insisted they go straight to the studio. They cut the song in one long day, John taking the guitars and lead vocal, Paul on bass, drums, piano, maracas—and coming in with breathtaking harmonies.

We typically look back on a broken partnership and assume it suffered from distance and alienation. But as Arthur and Elaine Aron have shown, relationships can suffer just as much from too much closeness and the consequent loss of control or identity. People describing these kinds of relationships use words like suffocating, smothering, overwhelming. They've lost too much of their individual distinction into a shared whole.

There's good reason to believe this happened with John and Paul. To understand why, we need to consider the reality of the early 1970s. Today, with Wikipedia and mountains of Beatles books, we have fantastic detail on the minutiae of their individual contributions. But when they worked together, and when they split, they were, as writers, just as they appeared in their credits: Lennon/McCartney. When John took tea at the Plaza Hotel in the 1970s, the pianist would serenade him with "Yesterday." On a TV show, the band played "Michelle" during a break. "At least I wrote the middle eight on that one," John said.

It was as though the partners had deposited every asset of reputation and identity into a joint bank account. After their split, they stood in line, day after day, to take the maximum withdrawal. Of course, there were literal bank accounts—immense financial and practical complications of their divorce. But what's interesting here is their self-conception—their desperate need to individuate. One of their most common words after the split was me. From Paul's self-questionnaire in April 1970:

Q: Did you enjoy working as a solo?

PAUL: Very much. I only had me to ask for a decision, and I generally agreed with me.

The next year, John told Jann Wenner that his first solo album was the "best thing I've ever done." "Now I wrote all about me and that's why I like it," he said. "It's me! And nobody else. That's why I like it." Paul got to the identity question even more directly in an interview with Life magazine. "It's like there was me, then the Beatles phase, and now I'm me again."

As they gave their history, John and Paul became relentless in dissecting their own work. This formed the bedrock of the history of their collaboration. Asked about the songs, they often used the possessive: "That's John's," Paul would say, or "That's mine." John would do the same. It's telling that two men with notoriously poor memories—neither knew how many times they'd been to Hamburg, for example—left in doubt the authorship of only a single melody in a single song ("In My Life").

Of course, they did make many distinct and identifiable contributions. But with the ferocity of their claims for singular ownership, did they protest too much?

Even their bitterness after the split speaks to connection. After Paul's press release, and his public shot at his ex-partner's exhibitions ("too many people preaching practices"), Lennon wrote a song called "How Do You Sleep" with the lines "Those freaks was right when they said you was dead" and "The only thing you done was Yesterday" and "The sound you make is Muzak to my ears."

This is nasty stuff. But the opposite of intimacy isn't conflict. It's indifference. The relationship between Paul and John had always been a tug of war—and that hardly stopped when they ceased to collaborate directly. Asked what he thought Paul would make of his first solo album, Lennon said, "I think it'll probably scare him into doing something decent, and then he'll scare me into doing something decent, like that."

Predictably, Paul took a mostly sunny air in interviews after the breakup—and he returned to an admiring view of John that would grow over the years. He even thanked his ex-partner for ushering in a new and vital phase of life. "I sort of picked up on his lead," Paul said in 1971. "John had said, 'Look, I don't want to be that anymore. I'm going to be this.' And I thought, 'That's great.' I liked the fact he'd done it, and so I'll do it with my thing. He's given the okay."

With John, the basic ambiguity came through—his loving Paul, and needing to stay separate. On The Mike Douglas Show in 1972, a young man in the audience asked John if "How Do You Sleep" was "vicious." John at first denied it, saying he had just had dinner with Paul who was laughing and smiling. "If I can't have a fight with my best friend," he said, "I don't know who I can have a fight with."

Douglas was just moderating, but it seems he couldn't resist this striking declaration. He turned to Lennon. "Is he your best friend, Paul?"

"I guess in the male sex he," John stammered, "— he was. I don't know about now, because I don't see much of him, you know."

Two years later, John would mix up his tenses when describing Paul in an even more revealing way. It was Thanksgiving night in 1974, when he joined Elton John at a sold-out show at Madison Square Garden.

Lennon wore a black silk shirt, a black jacket, and a necklace that dangled a flower over his chest. He had on his usual "granny" glasses with dark lenses. His thin, brown hair fell down past his shoulders. After storming through "Whatever Gets You Through the Night" and "Lucy in the Sky With Diamonds," Lennon came to the microphone to round out the set.

"I'd like to thank Elton and the boys for having me on tonight," he said. "We tried to think of a number to finish off with so I can get out of here and be sick, and we thought we'd do a number of an old, estranged fiance of mine, called Paul. This is one I never sang. It's an old Beatle number and we just about know it."

The song was "I Saw Her Standing There."

Though he lived another six years, John Lennon never took the stage for a major show again. His strange words have a peculiar and lasting echo. By then, Paul and John had been the most famous exes in the world for four years. But somehow, they were still "fiances"—prospective spouses. As much as had passed, the energy between them was always in front of them—always, somehow, in the future.


Source:
http://www.slate.com/articles/life/creative_pairs/features/2010/two_of_us/inside_the_lennonmccartney_connection_part_3.html

amoergosum
07-31-2012, 08:11 AM
writing credits don't really mean anything I guess. Virtually every Beatles song is credited as Lennon/McCartney, but the two hardly collaborated at all. Some bands consider adding instrumental parts as worthy of a writing credit, and others don't consider this as having significantly added to the "writing" of the song

How about doing some research before writing such nonsense?
>>>


Lennon-McCartney: Who Wrote What?

Hit Parader
April 1972

It's common knowledge that Paul composed some songs alone and John composed some alone. The royalties might have be shared, but sometimes not the workload on a particular piece.

To find out how much was written by who -- and even who wrote what -- early in 1972 Hit Parader magazine sat John Lennon down and went over the whole list of Lennon-McCartney material, that rich vein that changed the face of rock music almost overnight, going back to the first days of the Merseyliverpool Sound, up through Beatlemania to Sgt. Pepper and the break up.

Paul McCartney saw the list and came up with one correction. He said that John didn't write the music to "In My Life," just the words. Paul contends he worked out the melody on a mellotron in John's house.

LOVE ME DO: Paul wrote the main structure of this when he was about 16, or even earlier. I think I had something to do with the middle.

PS I LOVE YOU: Paul. But I think we helped him a bit. It was meant to be a Shirelles kind of song.

PLEASE PLEASE ME: I wrote all of this one--I was trying to do a Roy Orbison.

FROM ME TO YOU: Paul and me--we wrote this together in a van.

THANK YOU GIRL: Paul and me. This was just a silly song we knocked off.

SHE LOVES YOU: Both of us. We wrote it together on tour.

MISERY: Both of us. This was mainly mine though, I think.

DO YOU WANT TO KNOW A SECRET? Me. I wrote this for George.

I CALL YOUR NAME: Me. I started it when I was 15 and finished the middle eight years later, around "Help" or "Hard Day's Night" time.

I'LL BE ON MY WAY: Paul. This was early Paul.

BAD TO ME: Me. I wrote it for Billy J. Kramer.

IT WON'T BE LONG: Me. I wrote this on the second album. It was the song with the so-called Aeolian cadences, the same as in the Mahler symphony, at the end. I don't know what the hell it was about.

ALL MY LOVING: Paul. This was one of his first biggies.

LITTLE CHILD: Both of us. This was a knock-off between Paul and me for Ringo.

HOLD ME TIGHT: Both of us, but mainly Paul.

I WANNA BE YOUR MAN: Both of us, but mainly Paul.

I'LL KEEP YOU SATISFIED: Paul. This was for Billy J. Kramer.

LOVE OF THE LOVED: Paul. One of his very early songs, but I think he changed the words later for Cilla.

I'M IN LOVE: Me. I wrote it for the Fourmost.

HELLO LITTLE GIRL: Me. This was another very early song of mine recorded by the Fourmost.

CAN'T BUY ME LOVE: John and Paul, but mainly Paul.

FROM A WINDOW: Paul...must be Paul's. I can't really remember it.

LIKE DREAMERS DO: A very early one of Paul's.

AND I LOVE HER: Both of us. The first half was Paul's and the middle eight is mine.

I'LL BE BACK: Me. A nice tune though the middle is a bit tatty.

WORLD WITHOUT LOVE: Paul. An early one he wrote when he was about 16 or 17. I think he changed the words later for the record by Peter and Garfunkel or something.

ONE AND ONE IS TWO: Paul. That was a terrible one.

I FEEL FINE: Me. This was the first time feedback was used on a record. It's right at the beginning.

SHE'S A WOMAN: Paul. Though I helped with the middle, I think.

NO REPLY: Me. I remember Dick James coming to me after we did this one and saying, "You're getting much better now -- that was a complete story." Apparently before that he thought my songs tended to sort of, wander off.

I'LL FOLLOW THE SUN: Paul. A nice one--one of his early compositions.

EIGHT DAYS A WEEK: Both of us. I think we wrote this when we were trying to write the title song for Help! because there was at one time the thought of calling the film, Eight Arms To Hold You or something. I think that's the story, I'm not sure.

IT'S ONLY LOVE: Me. That's one song I really hate of mine. Terrible lyric.

YESTERDAY: Paul. Wow, that was a good 'un.

DAY TRIPPER: Me. But I think Paul helped with the verse.

WE CAN WORK IT OUT: Paul but the middle was mine.

NORWEIGAN WOOD: Me but Paul helped me on the lyric.

MICHELLE: Both of us. I wrote the middle with him.

WHAT GOES ON: Me. A very early song of mine. Ringo and Paul wrote a new middle eight together when we recorded it.

IN MY LIFE: Me. I think I was trying to write about "Penny Lane" when I wrote it. It was about places I remembered. A nice song. Jose Feleciano did a nice version of it.

RUN FOR YOUR LIFE: Me. Another one I never liked.

PAPERBACK WRITER: Paul. I think I might have helped with some of the lyrics. Yes, I did. But it was mainly Paul's tune.

ELEANOR RIGBY: Both of us. I wrote a good lot of the lyrics, about 70 percent. Ray Charles did a great version of this. Fantastic.

HERE THERE AND EVERYWHERE: Paul. This was a great one of his.

YELLOW SUBMARINE: Both of us. Paul wrote the catchy chorus. I helped with the blunderbuss bit.

SHE SAID, SHE SAID: I wrote it after meeting Peter Fonda who said he knew what it was like to be dead.

GOOD DAY SUNSHINE: Paul. But I think maybe I helped him with some of the lyric.

FOR NO ONE: Paul. Another of his I really liked.

AND YOUR BIRD CAN SING: Me. Another horror.

DR. ROBERT: Me. I think Paul helped with the middle.

GOT TO GET YOU INTO MY LIFE: Paul. I think George and I helped with some of the lyric, I'm not sure.

TOMORROW NEVER KNOWS: Me. This was my first psychedelic song.

PENNY LANE: Paul. I helped him with the lyric.

WITH A LITTLE HELP FROM MY FRIENDS: Paul. It was Paul's idea. I think I helped with some of the words. In fact, I did. Hunter Davies was there when we did it and mentioned it in the book. "What do you see when you turn out the light, I can't tell you but I know it's mine." That was mine.

LUCY IN THE SKY WITH DIAMONDS: Me. And once again, folks, this was Julian's title. It was nothing to do with LSD. I think Paul helped with the last verse.

GETTING BETTER: Paul. I think I helped with some of the words in the middle.

SHE'S LEAVING HOME: Both of us. Paul had the basic theme. But all those lines like "We sacrificed most of our life...We gave her everything money could buy...Never a thought for ourselves"...Those were the things (Aunt) Mimi used to say. It was easy to write.

BEING FOR THE BENEFIT OF MR. KITE: Me. I got some of the words off an old circus poster. I have it in the billiard room. The story that Henry the Horse meant heroin was rubbish.

WHEN I'M SIXTY FOUR: Paul. I think I helped Paul with some of the words, like "Vera, Chuck and Dave" and "Doing the garden, digging the weeds."

GOOD MORNING, GOOD MORNING: Me. A bit of a gobbledegook one, but nice words.

A DAY IN THE LIFE: Both of us. I wrote the bit up to "woke up fell out of bed" and I think Paul wrote "I'd love to turn you on." I got the idea from a news item in the British Daily Mail about 4000 holes in Blackburn.

BABY YOU'RE A RICH MAN: Both of us. In fact we just stuck two songs together for this one -- same as "A Day In The Life."

I AM THE WALRUS: Me -- I like that one. That was the time when I was putting Hare Krishna and all that down I hadn't taken it up then.

MAGICAL MYSTERY TOUR: Paul. I helped with some of the lyric.

HEY JUDE: Paul. That's his best song. It started off as a song about my son Julian because Paul was going to see him. Then he turned it into "Hey Jude." I always thought it was about me and Yoko but he said it was about him and his.

REVOLUTION: Me. I should never have put that in about Chairman Mao. I was just finishing off in the studio when I did that.

BACK IN THE U.S.S.R.: Paul. Maybe I helped a bit, but I don't think so.

HAPPINESS IS A WARM GUN: Me. That's another one I like. They all said it was about drugs but it was more about rock and roll than drugs. It's sort of a history of rock and roll. The title came from an American gun magazine. I don't know why people said it was about the needle in heroin. I've only seen somebody do something with a needle once and I don't like to see it at all.

ROCKY RACCOON: Paul. I might have helped with some of the words, I'm not sure.

WHY DON'T WE DO IT IN THE ROAD: Paul -- one of his best.

JULIA: Me. Yoko helped me with this one.

BIRTHDAY: Both of us. We wrote it in the studio.

EVERYBODY'S GOT SOMETHING TO HIDE EXCEPT MY AND MY MONKEY: Me. Fats Domino did a great version of this one.

SEXIE SADIE: Me. That was about the Maharishi.

BECAUSE: Me. This is a terrible arrangement. A bit like Beethoven's Fifth backwards.

ACROSS THE UNIVERSE: Me. One of my best songs. Not one of the best recordings but I like the lyrics.

A list of songs, according to Lennon, written by himself, about which he had no comment:

There's A Place; This Boy; All I've Got To Do; Not A Second Time; You Can't Do That; A Hard Day's Night; I Should Have Known Better; If I Fell; I'm Happy Just To Dance With You; Tell Me Why; Any Time At All; I'll Cry Instead; When I Get Home; I'm A Loser; I Don't Want To Spoil The Party; Ticket To Ride; Yes It Is; Help!; You've Got To Hide Your Love Away; You're Going To Lose That Girl; Nowhere Man; Girl; Rain; I'm Only Sleeping; Strawberry Fields Forever; Dear Prudence; Glass Onion; Bungalow Bill; I'm So Tired; Yer Blues; Cry Baby Cry; Goodnight; The Ballad Of John and Yoko; Come Together; I Want You (She's So Heavy); Mean Mr. Mustard; Polythene Pam; One After 909; Hey Bulldog; Don't Let Me Down; You Know My Name (Look Up The Number); Sun King; Dig A Pony; Dig It.

Songs which Lennon attributed directly to Paul McCartney, again offered with no comment:

I Saw Her Standing There; Tip Of My Tongue; I'll Keep You Satisfied; Nobody I Know; Things We Said Today; Don't Want To See You Again; I'm Down; The Night Before; Another Girl; Tell Me What You See; I've Just Seen A Face; That Means A Lot; You Won't See Me; I'm Looking Through You; Woman; Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band; Fixing A Hole; Lovely Rita; Hello Goodbye; Your Mother Should Know; Fool On The Hill; Step Inside Love; Oo Bla Di; Martha My Dear; Blackbird; I Will; Mother Nature's Son; Helter Skelter; Honey Pie; Lady Madonna; All Together Now; Get Back; Let It Be; Maxwell's Silver Hammer; Oh Darling; You Never Give Me Your Money; She Came In Through The Bathroom Window; Golden Slumbers; Carry That Weight; The End; Her Majesty; Two Of Us; The Long and Winding Road.

Songs attributed jointly to McCartney and himself by Lennon and offered again with no comment.

I'll Get You; I Want To Hold Your Hand; Baby's In Black; Every Little Thing; What You're Doing; Drive My Car; The Word; I've Got A Feeling.


Source:
http://www.beatlefan.net/b208394-lennon-mccartney-who-wrote-what.html

Slurpee
07-31-2012, 09:36 AM
LOL somebody a little sensitive today?

Unfortunately nothing of what you posted defends your initial comment, which is that "the two hardly collaborated at all." Obviously the truth is, there were two strong songwriters who were constantly collaborating, even if you can clearly attribute one song to one or the other. That thread shows up constantly in what you posted, and I wonder if you even read the sources that you are cutting and pasting here.

Slurpee
07-31-2012, 09:41 AM
Source:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lennon%E2%80%93McCartney

This one in particular supports what I'm saying. Through Sgt. Pepper's they had input in each other's songs; see "A Day in the Life" for the clearest example. It's weird that you think you're defending your point that there was "virtually no collaboration" with articles that discuss significant collaboration.

They certainly collaborated far more than Iha & Corgan, to get back on topic. Probably not even a relevant comparison.

Let's get into Roger Waters and David Gilmore next!

amoergosum
07-31-2012, 09:47 AM
LOL somebody a little sensitive today?

Unfortunately nothing of what you posted defends your initial comment, which is that "the two hardly collaborated at all."

LOL...I guess you didn't pay attention. I (amoergosum) posted the quotes of those
articles in order to underline that they did collaborate a lot.

Redbreegull posted this nonsense>>>

writing credits don't really mean anything I guess. Virtually every Beatles song is credited as Lennon/McCartney, but the two hardly collaborated at all. Some bands consider adding instrumental parts as worthy of a writing credit, and others don't consider this as having significantly added to the "writing" of the song

pale_princess
07-31-2012, 09:48 AM
wtf is with all this lennon/mccartney garbage, it was established long ago that james is the george harrison of sp!

myosis
07-31-2012, 10:46 AM
is it surprising that Monte has no reading comprehension?

+ james sings a song the he and billy both worked on. i'd say that's pretty positive. i don't see any passive-agressive statement in that. just because he can't sing very good doesn't mean he's mocking the song or the memory of it.

i bet it's an emotional moment for him. i guess thinking back he probably thinks he has been acting foolish at times.

Trotskilicious
07-31-2012, 11:04 AM
Can Monte write anything grammatically correct? He must have Asperger's Syndrome. Or just be fucking retarded.

don't compliment him by saying he's an aspie

amoergosum
08-03-2012, 12:42 PM
"Till Next Tuesday" >>>

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/7CgsWl6G2IQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>


Again >>>

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/WsSouJ0SAoc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

opera de nuit
08-03-2012, 12:47 PM
let's have a picnic, go see james iha.

Araneae
08-03-2012, 04:34 PM
No comment from Billy? I guess he didn't want to cater to anyone's expectations.

Shallowed
08-03-2012, 05:46 PM
wtf is with all this lennon/mccartney garbage, it was established long ago that james is the george harrison of sp!

I know you love James' songs but let's be honest, songwriting-wise he's the Ringo of SP. I wish he was the George.

Catherine Wheel
08-03-2012, 07:56 PM
James was more important to SP than Ringo was to the Beatles. Like George he is a competent even above average at times songwriter but he more often played a secondary / supporting role in the band. And like George his own personal style is quite different from the leader of the band.

pale_princess
08-03-2012, 08:14 PM
yeah man when i think of george i think of all those things. and also i think of 'something,' which is along the lovey love song lines of james' stuff.

plus james is my fave sp and george was my mom's fave beatle :cool:

rottenugly
08-03-2012, 08:29 PM
my grandmother saw the beatles in 1964 at maple leaf gardens.

Shallowed
08-03-2012, 09:02 PM
Something is my favourite Beatles song, but I like it for the music, not the lyrics.

rottenugly
08-03-2012, 09:43 PM
Here's the really weird thing: Nirvana allegedly soundchecked Alone + Easy Target in 1994.

Can you imagine Cobain singing it?

I can and it's wonderful.

I just wish Kurdt lived a few more months or even years.

Monet LSD
08-03-2012, 10:43 PM
http://a.yfrog.com/img875/5940/4oguv.jpg

ping-ping
08-04-2012, 11:03 PM
Where'd you find dem pix?

BlissedandGone2
08-05-2012, 12:59 AM
James was more important to SP than Ringo was to the Beatles. Like George he is a competent even above average at times songwriter but he more often played a secondary / supporting role in the band. And like George his own personal style is quite different from the leader of the band.

you've proven you know nothing about ringo, george, james, the beatles, the pumpkins, songwriting, and music in general.

s0ss
08-05-2012, 01:55 AM
I could never stand James Iha's singing.

BECAUSE HE CAN'T FUCKING SING.

Seriously. Take some lessons you FUCKING HACK.

It's not even the fact that he sounds like a retarded 13 year old Monte, he can't even sing to a fucking simple 4/4 beat.

There are spots where he just fucking stutters for a whole beat and I can only think he's having a brain aneurysm on stage.

MustardLies
08-05-2012, 02:13 AM
Octopus's Garden is an excellent song

Catherine Wheel
08-05-2012, 04:51 AM
you've proven you know nothing about ringo, george, james, the beatles, the pumpkins, songwriting, and music in general.

How was I wrong about this? Aside from being familiar with George's output in the Beatles I've also seen the documentary about him that was done recently and that is a pretty accurate description of what he did in the band. And James mirrors this in a lot of ways.

Monet LSD
08-05-2012, 07:11 AM
Where'd you find dem pix?

Hi,

https://twitter.com/Robinjskim/status/228789255244247042

Monet LSD
08-05-2012, 07:11 AM
http://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-snc7/582768_10150670146848284_698693838_n.jpg

ping-ping
08-05-2012, 08:03 AM
If only I could read Korean. One day they'll have a brain implant for that. Thanks!

Monet LSD
08-05-2012, 09:41 AM
:)

RenewRevive
08-05-2012, 10:24 AM
james is looking pretty good, looks like he's dropped some weight.

redbreegull
08-05-2012, 01:37 PM
amoerogosum and slurpee, you guys are both dumb. First of all, Slurpee can't even tell who is posting what.

I guarantee you I have listened to more Beatles in my life than either of you. Some parents instill God in their children, but in my house it was just the Beatles. It wasn't strictly accurate for me to say they hardly collaborated at all in a literal sense, but compared with most other songwriting partnerships, this is reasonably true, especially of the material once it moved beyond being silly, derivative rockabilly. John and Paul would bounce specific instrumentation ideas or lines of lyrics off each other, but when John says, "I wrote such and such song and Paul helped with the lyrics," Paul's contribution was likely a word here or there, and certainly far less than Iha's input on Mayonaise. Compared with the number of songs attributed to the duo, the percentage of ones they actually significantly collaborated on is really small. But this all goes back to my original original point, which is that the meaning of a shared writing credit is not clear cut. There are bands who consider adding instrumental parts to a song to be worthy of a writing credit, and there are bands who credit all their songs to a single writer, despite the fact that the songwriter almost certainly did not write and record every single part. There are partnerships where one writer works only on lyrics and the other on music. There's no way to tell how much collaboration occurred just because two names are attached to a song.

amoergosum
08-07-2012, 06:48 AM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lm0W6eqDeOI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Slurpee
08-07-2012, 10:10 AM
First of all, Slurpee can't even tell who is posting what.

In my defense, you all look like the same seething mass of rage to me.

Trotskilicious
08-07-2012, 11:16 AM
song writing credits are douchey, i love the idea of trying to quantify a motherfucker's contribution

soniclovenoize
08-07-2012, 01:01 PM
song writing credits are douchey, i love the idea of trying to quantify a motherfucker's contribution

It's important to some songwriters. Even to the point that mutual contracts are signed to specify what percent of the songs are written by whom. Otherwise, if there are no contracts made between songwriters, it will legally default to 50/50 (if two songwriters, and so forth).

Relating that to this thread, unless there was a contract written up between Corgan and Iha at the time, then the song is in fact 50% Corgan and 50% Iha, regardless of how miniscule Iha's contributions were.

Saih
08-07-2012, 05:24 PM
<iframe width="420" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lm0W6eqDeOI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

thanks for this!

brutechinasky
08-08-2012, 08:37 AM
I've always been curious about the writing credits of Farewell and Goodnight (Corgan/Iha on the record, only Iha for the BMI)
I've always felt it was some kind of compensation billy gave to james for all the little stuff he did in other songs (the solo in Zero etc.)
probably not a bargain for james

myosis
08-08-2012, 12:17 PM
i've always felt that billy was only credited for farewell&goodnight because of the piano part that the song ends with.

edit: they may have collaborated on the lyrics as well

myosis
08-08-2012, 12:23 PM
writing a pop song is basically writing a chord progression, a melody and some lyrics. you can add a solo on top of that or some texture here and there, but that doesn't warrant a songwriting credit.

if james got a credit for mayonaise it's probably because he deserved it, however much billy or others want to put it down.

subzero
08-08-2012, 02:10 PM
james used to make fun of alternative bands for being lame back in the day, and thats exactly what he is now

reprise85
08-08-2012, 02:43 PM
i've always felt that billy was only credited for farewell&goodnight because of the piano part that the song ends with.

edit: they may have collaborated on the lyrics as well

"the sun shines, but i don't" is surely a corgan lyric

soniclovenoize
08-08-2012, 03:07 PM
There was an interview where Corgan clarified the songwriting credits of that song.

Of course I don't remember what it was, or where it was.

reprise85
08-08-2012, 06:55 PM
is that the same one where he talked about all the TAFH songs? and talked about where the wah-wah sound in 1979 came from?

soniclovenoize
08-08-2012, 10:09 PM
is that the same one where he talked about all the TAFH songs? and talked about where the wah-wah sound in 1979 came from?

No, that's the Guitar World interview from 1996, and it wouldn't be that one because he talked about each song on the set, and F&G is not on the set! Unless he mentioned it in passing, but I don't believe he did.

reprise85
08-09-2012, 01:14 AM
oh ok