View Full Version : California cuts water to farmers by 85%


bardy
10-30-2008, 04:01 PM
STOP TAKING OUR WATER, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA!!!!!!!!!

http://www.news10.net/news/local/story.aspx?storyid=49889&catid=2


SACRAMENTO, CA - Farmers and cities that rely on the state for their supplies will get much less than they need next year, according to the Department of Water Resources, and that could prompt water rationing and less planting.

DWR on Thursday announced it will deliver just 15 percent of the amount that local water agencies throughout California request every year. (Read the news release and see the data when you click here.) That marks the second lowest projection since the first State Water Project deliveries were made in 1962.

The cutbacks could force farmers in the Central Valley to fallow fields and cities from the San Francisco Bay area to San Diego to impose mandatory water rationing. The state's reservoirs are low after two years of dry weather and court-ordered restrictions on water pumping out of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

The State Water Project delivers water to more than 25 million residents and 750,000 acres of farmland.

News10 is investigating this development and will have more this afternoon on News10 and news10.net. You can see previous News10 stories about drought conditions in California when you click here.

T&T
10-30-2008, 04:48 PM
don't you guys have an "ocean"?

maoi
10-30-2008, 04:56 PM
this states infrastructure is falling apart at the seams and our resources are dwindling like crazy. thank god the mormons are doing their job to help by stopping some guy from marrying another man

bardy
10-30-2008, 05:12 PM
don't you guys have an "ocean"?

Are you going to volunteer to drink and water your crops in salt water?

bardy
10-30-2008, 05:14 PM
well at least it's going to rain this weekend...............

bardy
10-30-2008, 05:16 PM
2009 Initial Water Allocation Announcement
Fact Sheet
10-30-08


 Earlier this year Governor Schwarzenegger issued a Drought Executive Order directing the Department of Water Resources (DWR) to help local water districts and agencies proactively address the effects of the drought.

 On or just prior to December 1st each year, DWR makes an initial announcement about how much water the State Water Project contractors will receive for the following year. This year, DWR is announcing the initial allocation early to help local agencies prepare for what could be another critically dry year.

 At this time, we expect the state to only be able to provide 15 percent of what the State Water Project (SWP) contractors have requested. This will be the second lowest initial allocation ever.

 The initial allocation is a conservative projection, because of the uncertainty about how much winter precipitation we will receive. The lowest initial allocation was made in 1993 which was just 10 percent of SWP Contractor’s requests. Last year, the initial allocation was 25 percent. Over the winter it was increased to 35 percent.

 In preparing the initial allocation, DWR considers a number of factors: conservative precipitation and hydrology estimates; carryover storage from 2008; SWP operating constraints, including additional 2009 Delta export restrictions to protect Delta Smelt and other endangered fish; and the 2009 contractor requests.

 It is still too early to accurately predict what type of winter California will have, but given the previous considerably dry two years, we must plan for the worst. Because the state’s total water storage is the lowest we’ve seen in 14 years, it would likely take an exceptionally wet year to get us out of the drought.

 Recently the National Weather Service revised its fall forecast for California indicating the possibility of a wet fall, with warm wet storms possible in November and December. While any rainfall will help the water supply picture, warm storms will not provide needed snowpack and can create high risks for California’s extensive fire damaged areas.

 Under different winter weather conditions the initial allocation of 15 percent could change. The following is a description of different “drought scenarios” and what the consequences for the SWP could be:


If the upcoming winter is dry:
The final SWP allocation would be very low – potentially one of the lowest in the history of the SWP. There would be no surplus water available for delivery to the state water contractors. Oroville Reservoir storage would remain critically low going into the irrigation season, and could end the water year even lower than we are now. San Luis Reservoir storage would also end the water year well below the historical average, very much like the current storage.

If the upcoming winter is average:
There would be a moderate final SWP allocation but no surplus water available for delivery to the contractors. Oroville Reservoir storage would start the irrigation season slightly below the historical average, but above the meager level attained this last May. Oroville Reservoir storage would end the water year below the historical average but above the current storage. San Luis Reservoir storage would end the water year with as little as half of the typical September storage.

If the upcoming winter is wet:
There would be a moderately high final SWP allocation, however a full allocation is very unlikely but the possibility of surplus water for delivery would exist. This would allow for the refilling and recharging of depleted surface and groundwater storage. Oroville Reservoir storage would be well positioned going into the irrigation season with a healthy above average May storage. Oroville Reservoir storage would end the water year above the typical September storage and augment the available supply for the following year. San Luis Reservoir storage would likely end the water year with about the average September storage, however under extremely wet conditions San Luis Reservoir storage could exceed the typical September storage.

bardy
10-30-2008, 05:17 PM
I drove by the San Luis res. the other day and it was absolutely depressing.

Nimrod's Son
10-30-2008, 05:40 PM
this states infrastructure is falling apart at the seams and our resources are dwindling like crazy. thank god the mormons are doing their job to help by stopping some guy from marrying another man

Also the state legislature has done such a terrible job of mismanaging money, creating wasteful spending and all in the name of the special interests. It's really sad.

bardy
10-30-2008, 05:42 PM
I wish they would spend some money fixing the terrible roads here

Nimrod's Son
10-30-2008, 06:28 PM
I wish they would spend some money fixing the terrible roads here
Roads only encourage driving and lead to global warming.

bardy
10-30-2008, 09:28 PM
they waste less gas than flying?

sppunk
10-30-2008, 11:01 PM
Fuck farmers. They don't turn profit and destroy the land and environment worse than pretty much any other industry.

bardy
10-30-2008, 11:03 PM
sppunk do you eat rocks

becuase if it isn't grown, it is mined

RopeyLopey
10-31-2008, 12:40 AM
I think CA farmers think 'fuck all those people moving to California'.

It would be interesting to see some comparison of numbers over the years of how much water goes to farming and how much of it goes to urban population.

Fattening Ass
10-31-2008, 01:00 AM
:rolleyes: to boody

Nimrod's Son
10-31-2008, 02:24 PM
they waste less gas than flying?
The reason the project to widen Interstate 5 and alleviate the huge traffic mess we have here was denied by the state with those exact words. Driving = bad!